17 February 1831

Vocal and Instrumental Music Concert

Wakefield: Music Saloon

 

Programme

Principal Vocalists: Mrs. P. Atkinson
Principal Instrumentalists: Mr. Moscheles

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Advertisements

Leeds Intelligencer (February 17, 1831): 2.

MUSIC SALOON, WAKEFIELD.—Messrs. WHITE and PHILLIPS have Pleasure in announcing to the Inhabitants of Wakefield and its Vicinity, that they have succeeded engaging Mrs. P. ATKINSON, (late Miss Goodall,) and Mr. MOSCHELES, the celebrated PIANIST, for THURSDAY EVENING February 17th, when they purpose giving a CONCERT of Vocal and Instrumental Music.

Further Arrangements will be announced in the Bills.

AFTER THE CONCERT BALL.

The Leeds Intelligencer (February 17, 1831): 3.

We are happy to inform our readers in Wakefield and its vicinity, that a great treat will be afforded them, in hearing the splendid talents of the above-named performers this evening, at the Music Saloon. We are persuaded that they will not lose so favourable an opportunity.

16 June 1823

Ignaz Moscheles’ Benefit Concert

London: New Argyll Rooms

Time: Evening

Tickets: 10s. 6d.

 

Programme

Part I  
Overture, Lodoiska Cherubini
AriaSignora CamporeseMozart  
From Otello: Duet, ‘Amor! possente nume’Mme Caradori, Signor GarciaRossini
Piano Concerto No.4 in E major
(composed expressly for this occasion)
Mr. Moscheles  Moscheles
Duet Buffo, ‘Nella casa devi avere’Signora de Begnis, Signor de BegnisGenerali
Glee, ‘The Banks of Allan Water’Miss Paton, Messrs. Hawes, Terrail, WelshHawes  
From Così fan Tutte: QuintetSignora Camporese, Signora de Begnis,
Signors de Begnis, Garcia
Mozart
Part II  
Overture, Zaira Winter
Glee, ‘The rainy night’Miss Goodall, Master Wesley, Mr. WelshWelsh
Free Piano FantasiaMr. Moscheles 
From The Beggar’s Opera: Song, ‘Cease your funning’Miss PatonPepusch
Fantasia Concertante on a Romance of
Blangini for Voice, Piano, Flute, Harp   
Mme Caradori, Messrs. Dizi, Moscheles, NicholsonMoscheles
From Twelfth Night: Song, ‘Bid me discourse’ Miss GoodallBishop
Instrumental Finale Haydn
Principal Vocalists: Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, Mme Caradori, Signora Camporese, Signora de Begnis; Master Wesley, Messrs. Hawes, Terrail, Welsh, Signors Begrez, de Begnis, Garcia
Principal Instrumentalists:  Messrs. Dizi, Moscheles, Nicholson
   Leader: Mr. Franz Cramer; Conductor. Mr. Johann Baptist Cramer

———————————

Advertisements

The Morning Chronicle (May 9, 1823): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS, REGENT-STREET.— Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms, on Monday, June 16. 

The Morning Post (May 26, 1823): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his concert will take place MONDAY, June 16. 1823, at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers—Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Caradori; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Sig. Garcia, Sig. Begrez, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Dizi, on the Harp; Mr. Nicholson, on the Flute; Mr. Moscheles, on the Pianoforte, who will perform a new MS. Concerto and Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, Half a Guinea each, to be had of Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street.

The Morning Chronicle (May 30, 1823): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that his CONCERT will take place MONDAY, June 16, at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers.—Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Caradori; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Signor Garcia, Signor Begrez, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Dizi, on the Harp; Mr. Nicholson, Flute; Mr. Moscheles, on the Piano-forte, who will perform a New MS. Concerto, and a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (June 1823): 88.

Mr. Moscheles has announced a concert, to be given at the Argyll Rooms on Monday, June 16th.

The Morning Chronicle (June 7, 1823).

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that his CONCERT will take place Monday, the 16th inst., at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Caradori; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Signor Garcia, Signor Begrez, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers—M. Dizi, on the Harp; Mr. Nicholson, Flute; Mr. Moscheles, on the Piano-forte, who will perform a New MS. Concerto, and Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street.

John Bull (June 8, 1823): 177.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place on MONDAY, JUNE 16, at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Caradori: Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Signor Garcia, Signor Begrez, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers, Mr. Dizi, Mr. Nicholson, and Mr. Moscheles, on the Piano forte, who will perform a new Concerto, a Fantasia extempore, and, by particular desire, the Fantasia Concertante on Blangini’s favourite romance, for Piano forte, Voice, Flute, and Harp. Leader of the band, Mr. F. Cramer. Conductor Mr. J. B. Cramer. —Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, No. 343, Oxford-street, and the principal musicshops. 

The Observer (June 8, 1823): 3.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place on MONDAY, June 16, at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Carradore [sic]: Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Signor Garcia, Signor Begrez, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers: Mr. Dizi on the Harp, Mr. Nicholson on the Flute; Mr. Moscheles, on the Piano forte, who will perform a new MS. Concerto, a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, Half-a-Guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moschelles, No. 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street. 

The Morning Chronicle (June 12, 1823): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that his CONCERT will take place Monday, the 16th inst., at the above Rooms. Principal Vocal Performers, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Signora Caradori; Signor Garcia, Signor Begrez, Mr. Welsh, Mr. Hawes, Mr. Terrail, Master Wesley, and Signor de Begnis. Principal Instrumental Performers, M. Dizi, Mr. Nicholson, and Mr. Moscheles, who will perform a New Concerto (composed expressly for this occasion; a Fantasia extempore; and (by particular desire) the Fantasia Concertante on a favourite Romance of Blangini, for Voice, Piano-forte, Flute, and Harp. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor. Mr. J. B. Cramer. Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street; and at the principal Music-shops.

John Bull (June 15, 1823): 185.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place TO-MORROW, MONDAY, JUNE 16th, at the above Rooms.—Part I. Overture (Lodoiska); Cherubini—Aria, Madame Camporese; Mozart-Duetto, Signora Caradori and Signor Garcia, “Amor possent nume;” Rossini—Concerto, Piano Forte, (composed expressly for this occasion) in the last movement of which is introduced the English Grenadier’s March, Mr. Moscheles; Moscheles—Duetto Buffo “Nella casa devi avere,” Madame Ronzi de Begnis and Signor de Begnis; Generali—Glee, “The Banks of Allan Water,” Miss Paton, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Hawes, and Mr. Welsh: Hawes—Quintetto, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi De Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Garcia, and Signor De Begnis (Cosi fan Tutte); Mozart.

Part II. Overture (Zaira); Winter—Glee, “The rainy night,” Miss Goodall, Master Wesley, and Mr. Welsh; Welsh—Fantasia extempore, on the Grand Piano forte, Mr. Moscheles—Song, Miss Paton, “Cease your funning,” (from the Beggar’s Opera)—By particular desire, the Fantasia Concertante on a favourite Romance of Blangini, for Voice, Piano-forte, Flute, and Harp, Signora Caradori, Messrs. Moscheles, Nicholson, and Dizi; Moscheles—Song, Miss Goodall. “Bid me discourse.” (Twelfth Night); Bishop—Instrumental Finale; Haydn.— —Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor. Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, No. 343, Oxford-street, and at the principal Music-shops.

The Morning Chronicle (June 16, 1823): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that his CONCERT will take place THIS EVENING, at the above Rooms. Part 1. Overture (Lodoiska); Cherubini—Aria, Madame Camporese; Mozart—Duetto, Signora Caradori and Signor Garcia, “Amor possente nume,” Rossini—Concerto, Piano Forte, (composed expressly for this occasion). In the last Movement of which is introduced the English Grenadier’s March, Mr. Moscheles; Moscheles—Duetto Buffo, “Nella casa devi avere,” Madame Ronzi de Begnis and Signor de Begnis; Generali—Glee, “The Banks of Allan Water,” Miss Paton, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Hawes, and Mr. Welsh: Hawes—Quintetto, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Garcia, and Signor De Begnis (Cosi fan Tutte); Mozart. Part II. Overture (Zaira); Winter—Glee, “The rainy night,” Miss Goodall, Master Wesley, and Mr. Welsh; Welsh—Fantasia extempore, on the Grand Piano forte, Mr. Moscheles—Song, Miss Paton, “Cease your funning,” (from the Beggar’s Opera)—(by particular desire), the Fantasia Concertante on a favourite Romance of Blangini, for Voice, Piano-forte, Flute, and Harp, Signora Caradori, Messrs. Moscheles, Nicholson, and Dizi; Moscheles—Song, Miss Goodall. “Bid me discourse.” (Twelfth Night); Bishop—Instrumental Finale; Haydn.—Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor. Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, half-a-guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, No. 343, Oxford-street, and at the principal Music-shops.

The Morning Post (June 16, 1823): [1].

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place THIS EVENING, at the above Rooms.—Part I. Overture (Lodoiska), Cherubini; Aria, Madame Camporese. Mozart; Duetto, Signora Caradori and Signor Garcia, “Amor possente nume;” Rossini; Concerto. Piano-forte (composed expressly for this occasion), in the last Movement of which is introduced the English Grenadier’s March. Mr. Moscheles, Moscheles; Duetto Buffo. “Nella casa devi avere,” Madame Ronzi De Begnis and Signor de Begnis; Generali; Glee, “The Banks of Allan Water,” Miss Paton, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Hawes, and Mr. Welsh. Hawes; Quintetto, Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi De Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Garcia, and Signor De Begnis (Cosi fan Tutte); Mozart.—Part II. Overture (Zaira), Winter; Glee, “The rainy night,” Miss Goodall, Master Wesley, and Mr. Welsh, Welsh; Fantasia extempore, on the Grand Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles; Song, Miss Paton, “Cease your funning,” (from the Beggar’s Opera); by particular desire, the Fantasia Concertante on a favourite Romance of Blangini, for Voice, Piano-forte, Flute, and Harp, Signora Caradori, Messrs. Moscheles, Nicholson, and Dizi, Moscheles; Song, Miss Goodall, “Bid me discourse.” (Twelfth Night), Bishop; Instrumental Finale; Haydn. Leader of the Band. Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer. Tickets, Half a Guinea each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, No. 343, Oxford-street, and at the principal Music Shops.

Reviews

The Harmonicon, vol. I (July 1823): 103.

MR. MOSCHELES’S CONCERT.

The Concert of M. Moscheles took place at the Argyll Rooms on Monday the 16th of June. Mr. F. Cramer led the band, and Mr. Cramer sat at the piano-forte as conductor. A strong vocal phalanx assisted on this occasion, amongst whom were Mesdames Camporese, and Ronzi de Begnis; Madlles. Caradori, Paton and Goodall, Signors Begrez, De Begnis, Mr. Welsh, &c. The rooms were all full, and the performance was excellent. M. Moscheles played a new concerto, in which deep musical knowledge and fancy were happily blended; in his finale he introduced the well-known English tune, the Grenadier’s March, and put every head, and almost as many hearts, into motion. In the second part he performed a fantasia, extempore, and excited as much astonishment by the readiness of his invention, as by the indescribable rapidity of his execution, and power of hand. The two principal airs, of which this piece consisted, were the romance from La Donna del Lago, given in our Third Number, and the Scottish air inserted in the present. The applause he gained was almost tumultuous, and it was really deserved.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (September 10, 1823): 597-599.

London. Concert des Hrn. J. Moscheles am 16tenJuni. Es ist schwer, von Hrn. Moscheles und seinem Concert ohne grosse Ausführlichkeit nach Gebühr zu sprechen; denn es war unleugbar eins der allervorzüglichsten, die diesen Sommer öffentlich Statt gehabt haben. Ueber sein Spiel haben sich die Kunstrichter in Lobeserhebungen erschöpft, und sie begnügen sich, nunmehrseine Leistungen auf dem Pianoforte als Muster, wenn auch unerreichbare, aufzustellen. Man kann sich kaum denken, wie es möglich ist, auf den Zuhörer stärker, fast möchte man sagen, heftiger zu wirken, als Hr. Moscheles es thut. Offenbar liegt der Grund davon in der Allgewalt, welche er über sein Instrument hat, welche alle Stufen vom Leichten zum Schweren verschwinden macht. Sey es, dass wir bey diesem Concert den freywilligen Beystand so vieler berühmten Künstler oder die zahlreiche, glänzende Gesellschaft, welche den ganzen Saal und alle Nebenzimmer füllte, erwägen; immer bleibt es ein ehrenvoller Beweiss von der Achtung, in welcher Hr. M. hier zu Lande steht. Wenn gleich Mad. Salmon und Dem. Stevens, die prime donne des englischen Gesanges, nicht mitwirkten, so bildeten dagegen die andern englischen und die italienischen Sänger ein Personale, so schön wir es selten im Philharmonischen Concerte gesehen. Es ist hinreichend, die Namen Camporese, Goodall, Caradori, Paton, Ronzi de Begnis nebst ihrem Gemahl, Welsh, Begrez u. s. w. anzuführen. Es war erfreulich, Hrn. J. B. Cramer seinem jüngern Kunstfreunde in der Anordnung und Leitung des Ganzen so zur Hand gehen zu sehen. Unter den vorkommenden Musikstücken machte am meisten Aufsehen ein ganz neues Pianoforte-Concert E dur von Hrn. M. Man könnte es mit Recht die Krone seiner Werke nennen, durch Neuheit und Eigenthümlichkeit der Ideen nicht weniger als durch ihre gelehrte und kunstreiche Behandlung. Im letzten Satze halte er den bekannten englischen Grenadiermarsch zum Thema gewählt, wodurch er den Engländern ein reichlich zinsendes Compliment machte. Die Ausführung war in jeder Hinsicht der Vortrefflichkeit des Werks entsprechend. In der zweyten Abtheilung trat Hr. Moscheles noch zweymal auf: mit der hier so beliebten Phantasie auf eine Romanze Blangini’s von ihm für die Stimme, Pianoforte, Flöte und Harfe gesetzt, und einer Phantasie extempore, welche über alle Beschreibung ist. Die freye Phantasie ist hier eine ganz neue Gattung des Spiels, und eine vor Hrn. Moscheles noch nicht betretene Bahn zum Ruhm. Sie ist ganz eigentlich sein Feld, weil sich nur so das Feuer seines schöpferischen Geistes in ungehemmten Strömen ergiessen kann. Die hiesigen Zeitungen sprechen darüber also: „Seine freye Phantasie erregte eben so viel Erstaunen durch die Leichtigkeit der Erfindung, als durch die unbeschreibliche Fertigkeit und Kraft seiner Finger. Der Beyfall, welchen er einerntete, war tumultuarisch, und er war wirklich verdient“. Harmonikon No. 7. Und andere Blätter. Wohl mag Deutschland auf einen solchen Mann stolz seyn. Und wie dankbar würden seine Landsleute es erkennen, wenn sie wüssten, was für Dienste er seinem Vaterlande erweiset, dadurch dass er bey jeder guten Gelegenheit den hohen Werth der grössten deutschen Genien ins rechte Licht stellt, dass er unermüdet ihre besten Werke durch Wort und That zu verbreiten sucht, dass er immer mit der grössten Verehrung von dem unvergleichlichen Mozart spricht.

24 June 1822

Ignaz Moscheles’ Benefit Concert

London: New Argyll Rooms

Time: Evening

Tickets: 10s. 6d.

 

Programme

Fantasia Concertante on a Romance of
Blangini for Voice, Piano, Violin, Harp      
Mlle Cinti; Messrs. Moscheles, Kiesewetter, DiziMoscheles
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘Auld Lang Syne’Mr. Moscheles 
Grand Piano Variations on a Military March with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations)Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Concerto No.3 in G minor (MS)Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Principal Vocalists:  Miss Stephens, Mlle Cinti, Mme. Caradori, Mrs. Salmon, Signora Camporese; Messrs. Begrez, J. B. Sale, Sapio, Vaughan, W. Knyvett; Signor Zuchelli  
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Dizi, Kiesewetter, Moscheles
Leader: Mr. Franz Cramer; Conductor: Mr. Johann Baptist Cramer

———————————

Encore: Fantasia Concertante on a Romance ofBlangini for Voice, Piano, Violin, Harp—Mlle Cinti; Messrs. Moscheles, Kiesewetter, Dizi—Moscheles


Charlotte: Moscheles played his G minor concerto, which he had lately reconstructed, first at the Philharmonic, and afterwards at his own concert, with much applause. On the last occasion he was supported by the charming Cinti, Kiesewetter, and Dizi, the excellent harp-player. Everything went well and effectively together. [RMM, 44-45.]

Moscheles: We have, however… rehearsed here quite in a different manner from what people usually do, for, generally speaking, there is no rehearsal at all, often one half of the band runs once through the music. And what do the singers do? They sing incessantly the few things which the orchestra know, and which the public is never weary of hearing. [RMM, 45.]

Advertisements

The Morning Chronicle (May 17, 1822): 1.

MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, that his CONCERT, under the patronage of his Serene Highness Prince Esterhazy, will take place at the NEW ARGYLL ROOMS, on Friday, June 14.[1]

[1] Moscheles did not perform on June 14. The advertisement was either a typographical error or the date of the concert was firstly set to June 14 and was changed later to June 24. Nonetheless, if that was the case there is not an advertisement to refer to the change of the concert date. It is more likely that the date was a misprint, especially since another error is found in The Morning Chronicle on June 17. 

The Morning Post (June 6, 1822): 1.

MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, that his CONCERT, under the patronage of his Serene Highness Prince Esterhazy, will take place at the New Argyll Rooms, on MONDAY, the 24th instant.

John Bull (June 9, 1822): 617.

MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, that his CONCERT under the patronage of his Serene Highness Prince ESTERHAZY, will take place at the NEW ARGYLL ROOMS, on MONDAY, the 24th inst.

John Bull (June 16, 1822): 625.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.

MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms, on MONDAY, the 24th of JUNE. Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese, Signora Caradori, and Signora Cinti, Mr. Vaughan, Signor Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi and Mr. Moscheles, who will perform, on the Grand Piano Forte, a New Concerto, the Fall of Paris, with Variations (by desire) and a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer: Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer—Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, and at the principal Music Warehouses.

The Observer (June 16, 1822): 3.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms, MONDAY, June 24, 1822. Principal Vocal Performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese; Signora Caradori and Signora Cinti, Mr. Vaughan, Signor Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi, Mr. Moscheles, who will perform on the Grand Piano Forte a new Concerto, the “Fall of Paris,” with Variations (by desire), and a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer. Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street (opposite Portland-street), and at the principal Music Warehouses.

The Morning Post (June 17, 1822): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms on MONDAY, June 24, 1822. Principal Vocal performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese; Signora Caradori and Signora Cinti; Mr. Vaughan, Signor Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal instrumental performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi, Mr. Moscheles, who will perform on the Grand Piano Forte a new Concerto, “The fall of Paris,” with variations (by desire), and a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer. Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer. Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street. Opposite Portland-street, and at the principal Music Warehouses.

The Morning Chronicle (June 17, 1822): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms on MONDAY next.—Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese; Sig. Caradori and Signora Cinti; Mr. Vaughan, Sig. Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi, Mr. Moscheles, who will perform on the Grand Pianoforte a New Concerto, “The fall of Paris,” with Variations, by desire, and a Fantasia extempore.—Leader of the Band, Mr. J. B. Cramer,[2] Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street. Opposite Portland-street, and at the principal Music Warehouses.

[2] Typographical error.

The Morning Chronicle (June 19, 1822): 1.

[The advertisement from June 17 was published again with the same typographical error]

John Bull (June 23, 1822): 634.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.

MR. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms, on MONDAY, the 24th of JUNE. Principal Vocal Performers–Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese, Signora Caradori, and Signora Cinti, Mr. Vaughan, Signor Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi and Mr. Moscheles, who will perform, on the Grand Piano Forte, a New Concerto, the Fall of Paris, with Variations (by desire) and a Fantasia extempore. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer: Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer—Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had of Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, and at the principal Music Warehouses.

The Morning Chronicle (June 24, 1822): 1.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms THIS EVENING.—Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese; Sig. Caradori and Signora Cinti; Mr. Vaughan, Sig. Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental Performers—Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi, Mr. Moscheles, who will perform on the Grand Pianoforte a New Concerto, “The fall of Paris,” with Variations, by desire, and a Fantasia extempore.—Leader of the Band, Mr. J. B. Cramer,[3] Conductor, Mr. J. B. Cramer.—Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street. Opposite Portland-street, and at the principal Music Warehouses.

[3] Typographical error repeated for the 3rd time.

The Times (June 24, 1822): 2.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—Mr. MOSCHELES has the honour to announce that his CONCERT will take place at the above Rooms THIS EVENING, June 24. Principal Vocal performers, Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens, Madame Camporese, Signora Caradori, and Signora Cinti, Mr. Vaughan, Sig. Begrez, Mr. Sapio, Mr. W. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Signor Zuchelli. Principal Instrumental performers. Mr. Kiesewetter, Mr. Dizi, and Mr. Moscheles, who will perform on the grand pianoforte a New Concerto, ‘the fall of Paris,’ with variations (by desire,) and a fantasia extempore. Leader of the band Mr. F Cramer.  Conductor Mr. J. B. Cramer. Tickets, 10s. 6d. each, to be had at Mr. Moscheles, 343, Oxford-street, opposite Portland-street, and at the principal music warehouses.

Reviews

The Morning Post (June 26, 1822): 3.

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS.—The various talent and surprising powers of MOSCHELLES were displayed at his Concert on Monday night with an effect which called forth the most enthusiastic applause, and added fresh honours to those he had already so universally obtained. We have spoken on a former occasion of his Concerto, which he again performed with increased eclat. His variations on the “Fall of Paris” were the ne plus ultra of brilliancy and fine execution. The Fantasia Concertante for voice, piano-forte, violin and harp, so enraptured the audience, that it was unanimously encored. His last performance was an extemporaneous fantasia, which combined the most profound science with all that grace, imagination, taste, and genius could bring to its aid. The execution of four pieces in one concert, and all with such undiminished perfection and fire, was certainly one of the most extraordinary efforts we have ever witnessed.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (August 3, 1822): 493-494.

London.

Herr Moscheles von Wien, einer der berühmtesten Fortepianospieler unserer Zeit, gab am 24. Juny unter der Protection Sr. Durchl. des Herrn Fürsten Esterhazy, in den Argyll – Sälen ein Concert, welches von einem gewählten und sehr zahl reichen Publicum besucht, und worin demselben mit vielen Beyfallsbezeigungen die öffentliche Achtung vor seinem schönen Spiele eclatant zu erkennen gegeben wurde.

Was diesen Abend nur aufgeführt wurde, zeichzete sich durch eine grosse Präcision und Rundung im Vortrag aus, und in der That strengte jeder der Instrumentalisten sowohl, als der Sänger seine höchste Kraft und Kunst an, um diesen Abend zu einer Unterhaltung im Kunstgebiethe vom ersten Range zu machen.

Herr Moscheles spielte ein Concert und Variationen von seiner eigenen Composition in einem so meisterlichen Style, dass der allgemeine und enthusiastische Beyfall wirklich seinen Ruf als Tonkünstler sehr vermehrte. Hierauf folgte eine Concertante Phantasie für Gesang, Pianoforte, Violin und Harfe, welche von der Sgra. Cinti, Herrn Moscheles, Herrn Dizzi und den unübertrefflichen Violinisten Herrn Kiesewetter vorgetragen und zwar mit solcher Vollendung executirt wurde, dass man stürmisch ihre Wiederhohlung verlangte. Der Fall von Paris und sein letztes Stück eine extemporirte Phantasie, vereinigten Kunst, Grazie, Einbildungskraft, und waren Producte genialer Schöpferkraft.

Anmerkung. Von welchem Meister die Phantasie war, davon wird in dem Berichte nichts gemeldet.

D. R.

The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. IV (1822): 295-298.

TO THE EDITOR.

         SIR,

It is unquestionably true that without a disposition, irresistibly impelled by nature and cultivated by unremitted industry, nothing of striking excellence can be produced in the fine arts; but it is equally true that without the energy which is excited by emulation, some of the finest efforts of human ability would never have been made. It is a sufficient gratification to ambition for the most part to have gained an ascendancy over the obstacles within the immediate sphere of its own action, and when that point is attained, a diminution of vigour too often follows, which is barely capable of maintaining an even line of progression. There is some danger too lest the satisfaction arising from imagined strength should lower exertion by imperceptible degrees, until it reach that point where the attraction of indolence becomes too powerful for the spirit ever more to make a successful struggle against it. But, on the other hand, let a man, whilst his faculties are yet strong, be placed in competition with others of equal talent with himself, and he at once feels a stimulus which not only enables him to maintain the eminence he has acquired, but gives a wing to his imagination that produces a bolder flight than his unopposed daring would ever have taken. I have been led into these remarks by observations scattered over the surface of several papers in your Review, and by the exemplification of their truth in the effect produced by the second visit of MR. MOSCHELES to this country. His own talent has been manifestly improved from his having come amongst us, and in addition to the delight which the novelty, beauty, and excellence of his performance have produced, I am persuaded that an impetus has been given to the great talent resident amongst us, which has not only already called forth abilities which might otherwise have lain quiescent, but put such powers into activity as promise excellences of still greater importance. You have already noticed this, and I have no doubt you will have the gratifying task of still continuing to do so in the progress of the musical art during succeeding seasons. The pleasure which resulted to the public from the joint performances of MR. CRAMER and MR. MOSCHELES cannot easily be forgotten, and the astonishing powers displayed by MR. KALKBRENNER at the concert of SPAGNOLETTI filled all who had the advantage of hearing him with admiration. This brilliant performance without doubt operated upon the aspiring mind of MR. MOSCHELES, and called forth the full display of his talents at his own benefit concert. In the course of the evening he executed four pieces equally admirable, as they were different in character (one of which was universally encored) and all with unabated vigour, vivacity of feeling, and splendour of effect. It is thus that a generous conflict of talent elicits the noblest efforts of art, and I cannot but commiserate the confined views of those who, under a false notion that national genius is injured and depressed by the patronage of foreigners, would deprive their country and their art of the great advantages to be derived from the acquisition of continental excellence. It is from comparison alone that a just conception can be formed of whatever is true in taste and sound in judgment, and whoever would deprive himself of the opportunity of obtaining so desirable a means of improvement, shews himself destitute of that feeling and clearness of perception which is capable of rendering him a lasting ornament to his profession. Never let it be believed that national worth will ever want its proper appreciation, for wherever a preponderance of talent exists, public opinion will give it its due influence; and a strong proof that this country contains a fund of good taste and correct judgment for the purpose, is, the confession of the most able foreigners, that there is no city in Europe where an artist is so soon placed in the situation to which his talents entitle him, as in London. False glitter may for a moment confound our opinion, but it is quickly stripped of its deception, and the public infallibly returns to solid ability with renewed and increased homage. Insulated as we are, we need the presence of foreign skill to make us conscious of our national prejudices, and it would be folly to deny the immense profit we have derived from it. The inhabitants of the continent come to us to learn large and comprehensive views of political freedom, to which the mind of the country has been almost exclusively directed; but it must be confessed, that we are indebted to the continent for having disencumbered our faculties of the circumscribed views with which we were long accustomed to contemplate the arts. Whenever men have started up amongst us, capable of honourably contending with our instructors, their progress has been marked with as great fame abroad as in their own country; and at this moment, when there is so great a competition in that department of music to which these remarks more immediately relate, I may point out our country man FIELD, who holds a reputation throughout the continent, of such high distinction, as to set national comparisons at defiance. We have others in different branches of the arts as well as in this, who might make the boldest claims on fame were their abilities displayed on a more extensive stage; and it is only by frequent encounters with foreign excellence that we shall ultimately shake off the restraint not unjustly attributed to us, and shew the world that we are capable of as great prowess in all the arts as we have proved ourselves to be in science and in arms. To these observations I shall simply subjoin the pieces which MR. MOSCHELES played at his concert, for it is impossible for me to convey an adequate idea of the impression made upon my mind and apparently on that of the whole audience, by the wonderful and fanciful execution, exquisite delicacy, taste, boldness, and originality of style with which this inimitable master performed them.

         A new Manuscript Concerto.

         The Fall of Paris, with Variations.

         A new Fantasia, on a favourite Romance of Blangini, for Voice,

     &c. &c. This Fantasia was encored.

         A Fantasia extempore.

Do not imagine, Sir, that I am the partial advocate of individuals—I contend only for principles, and I hold it palpably absurd to maintain that foreigners have risen to the station they enjoy, not by their merits, but by favouritism. I quite agree with your correspondent VETUS,* in the practicability there appears of English professors rising to equal eminence with those of foreign growth, and I admit his instances; but at the same time who does not see the acknowledged excellence of foreign performers in almost every branch of the profession? Take those I have named, and add KEISEWETTER, DRAGONETTI, PUZZI, BOCHSA, and numberless others, whose talents have raised them to the first rank, and why should not they enjoy their deserts? Can we produce four such artists as those I have just named? Is then our general knowledge and estimation of proficiency in art to be stooped to a prejudice?— certainly not. Are our orchestras to be lowered in order to give unqualified natives an unearned precedence? Is the public to shew less deference and respect to such abilities because they happen to belong to a German, an Italian, or a Frenchman? Liberality and good sense forbid! I am for no restrictive duties—but for the fairest competition. Quality and cheapness are what a nation ought alone to regard, and these properties are only to be obtained by the most open competition. All other principles are alike foolish and fallacious. Stimulate our countrymen to try their powers—but, for the sake of all the acquisitions to which perseverance and ability aspire, do not encourage indolence by any exclusive privileges indulged to birth-place. “Genius is of no country.”

                                                                                             I am, Sir, your’s, &c.

FAIR PLAY.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung mit besonderer Rücksicht auf den österreichischen Kaiserstaat (August 3, 1822): 493-494.

London.

Herr Moscheles von Wien, einer der berühmtesten Fortepianospieler unserer Zeit, gab am 24. Juny unter der Protection Sr. Durchl. des Herrn Fürsten Esterhazy, in den Argyll-Sälen ein Concert, welches von einem gewählten und sehr zahl reicher Publicum besucht, und worin demselben mit vielen Beyfallsbezeigungen die öffentliche Achtung vor seinem schönen Spiele eclatant zu erkennen gegeben wurde.

Was diesen Abend nur aufgeführt wurde, zeichnete sich durch eine grosse Präcision und Rundung im Vortrag aus, und in der That strengte jeder der Instrumentalisten sowohl, als der Sänger seine höchste Kraft und Kunst an, um diesen Abend zu einer Unterhaltung im Kunstgebiethe vom ersten Range zu machen.

Herr Moscheles spielte ein Concert und Variationen von seiner eigenen Composition in einem so meisterlichen Style, dass der allgemeine und enthusiastische Beyfall wirklich seinen Ruf als Tonkünstler sehr vermehrte. Hierauf folgte eine Concertante Phantasie für Gesang, Pianoforte, Violin und Harfe, welche von der Sgra. Cinti, Herrn Moscheles, Herrn Dizzi und den unübertrefflichen Violinisten Herrn Kiesewetter vorgetragen und zwar mit solcher Vollendung executirt wurde, dass man stürmisch ihre Wiederholung verlangte. Der Fall von Paris und sein letztes Stück eine extemporirte Phantasie, vereinigten Kunst, Grazie, Einbildungskraft, und waren Producte genialer Schöpferkraft.

Anmerkung. Von welchem Meister die Phantasie war, davon wird in dem Berichte nichts gemeldet.

D. R.

The London Magazine, vol. 6, (August 1822): 183-184.

Since our last there have been three Concerts of the first class, one for the benefit of Mr. Moschelles, the second for Mr. Lafont, and the third given by Madame Catalani for the distressed Irish, the relief of persons confined for small debts, and some other charitable institution. Mr. Moschelles is already well known to our readers as a pianoforte player of the very finest accomplishments—he combines, in a very eminent degree, brilliancy with expression, and is surpassed by no existing performer in force and effect. On this occasion he played three pieces in one of which The Fall of Paris was the subject, and an extempore Fantasia, in which he introduced the air of Auld Lang Syne. These compositions were popular as well as scientific, and displayed his great qualities in their most attractive attire, his concerto, which was more scientific, seemed rather designed for the professor than for a general audience, and was not therefore so effective as the others.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (September 18, 1822): 623-624.

[London, 19 July] Hr. Moscheles spielte im letzten philharmonischen Concerte ein noch ungedrucktes Concert von seiner eigenen Composition mit vielem Beyfall und liess sich auch in… seinem eigenen Benefice Concerte…mit gleichem Erfolg hören.