23 November 1845

Royal Soiree Musicale

 

Saint-Cloud: Château de Saint-Cloud

Programme

Grande Sonate Symphonique No.2,
for Piano Four-Hands
Miss E. Moscheles, Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano SoloMiss. E. Moscheles 
Free Piano FantasiaMr. Moscheles 
Principal Instrumentalists: Miss E. Moscheles, Moscheles

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Charlotte: Aus dem Badischen geht es nach Paris, wo Moscheles seine Sonate symphonique componirt und sie dann mit Hallé, später mit seiner Tochter in befreundeten künstlerischen Kreisen zu Gehör bringt. Tags vor seiner Abreise wird er nach St. Cloud befohlen, wo man die auch in der Oeffentlichkeit besprochene neue Composition hören will. [AML II, 146.]

Moscheles: Am 23. November…mit E. [Emily Moscheles] nach St. Cloud, von der königlichen Familie freundlichst empfangen. Die Königin, Mme. Adelaide, die Herzogin von Orleans mit ihren Damen und Cavalieren beim Thee, der König kam aus einer anstossenden Galerie, um die Sonate zu hören, die E. sehr brav spielte; sie musste auch Solo spielen; ich phantasirte à la Gretry, des Königs Lieblingsgenre. Alles machte den besten Eindruck. [AML II, 146.]

Reviews

Journal des débats politiques et littéraires (November 27, 1845): 3.

—Le célèbre pianiste et compositeur Moschelès a eu l’honneur d’être appelé avec sa Bile dimanche soir au château de Saint-Cloud, pour exécuter devant LL. MM. et la famille royale une nouvelle grande sonate à quatre mains, composée par Moschelès, et dont la dédicace a été agréée par le Roi.

LL. MM. ont paru très satisfaites de cette belle et large composition. Mlle Emilie Moschelès, tout en voulant rester éloignée de la carrière musicale, suit avec éclat les traces de son père, et tous deux ont été dignement appréciés par l’illustre auditoire.

M. Moschelès est reparti lundi pour Londres.

The Morning Post (November 29, 1845): 5.

Moscheles, the pianist, and his daughter, had the honour of performing on Sunday evening, before the Royal Family, at St. Cloud, a new grand sonata four hands, which the King has permitted to be dedicated to him.

La France Musicale (November 30, 1845): 382.

*** M. Moschelès, avant son départ pour Londres, a eu l’honneur d’étre admis au palais de Saint-Cloud, et il a exécuté avec sa jeune fille Emilie, sa belle son te inédite à quatre mains, devant le roi et la famille royale. Le célèbre compositeur a été complimenté avec effusion par S. M. et toute a cour.

Revue et Gazette Musicale de Paris (November 30, 1845): 391.

Moschelès a eu l’honneur d’être appelé avec sa fille, dimanche soir, au château de Saint-Cloud, pour exécuter devant LL. MM. et la famille royale la nouvelle grande sonate à quatre mains qu’il vient de terminer à Paris, et dont la dédicace a été agréée par le roi. LL. MM. ont paru très satisfaites de cette belle et large composition, supérieurement rendue par l’auteur et par sa fille, qui, sans vouloir embrasser la carrière d’artiste, suit avec éclat les traces de son père. Moschelès est reparti lundi dernier pour Londres.

The Musical World, a Weekly Record of Musical Science, Literature, and Intelligence, vol. XX (December 4, 1845): 585.

MOSCHELES.—This distinguished pianist and composer has returned to London with his family. He has been lately sojourning in Paris, where he has produced a great sensation by a new composition, in the form of a symphony for two performers on the pianoforte. This was executed by the author and Charles Hallé, before nearly all the celebrated artists in Paris—and subsequently at the court, before their Majesties the King and Queen of the French, by Mr. Moscheles and his clever daughter, Miss Julia Moscheles. The illustrious auditors expressed their august satisfaction in the most flattering terms.

The Era (December 7, 1845): 5.

The celebrated pianist and composer, Moscheles, executed on Sunday last, at the Chateau of St. Cloud, before the royal family, his new grande Sonata à quatre mains, which the King had allowed to be dedicated to him. Their Majesties appeared well satisfied with this fine and masterly composition. Mdlle. Emilie, Moscheles, the daughter of the composer, though not intending to cultivate music professionally, is following with distinction the traces of her father.

Der Humorist (December 10, 1845): 1180. Moscheles ist in Paris, und hat kürzlich mit seiner Tochter Emile eine vierhändig Sonate vor der königlichen Familie ausgeführt, deren Widmung Se. Maj. der König Ludwig Philipp angenommen hat.

29 October 1839

Royal Soiree Musicale

 

Saint-Cloud: Château de Saint-Cloud

Programme

Melanges of Etudes and NocturnesMr. ChopinChopin
EtudesMr. MoschelesMoscheles
Grande Sonate in E Flat Major
for Piano Four-Hands (Op.47)
Messrs. Chopin, MoschelesMoscheles
Piano SoloMr. Chopin 
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. themes
from Grisar’s La folle
Mr. Chopin 
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. the opening
from Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte and
themes from Don Giovanni
Mr. Moscheles 
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Chopin, Moscheles

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Programme notes: The piano brand was Pleyel owned by Friedrich Kalkbrenner

Encore: Grande Sonate in E Flat Major for Piano Four-Hands (Op.47): II. Andantino quasi allegretto—Messrs. Chopin, Moscheles—Moscheles


Moscheles: Today I got a note from Count Perthuis, Adjutant to King Louis Philippe. The Count has often heard Chopin and myself play my E flat major Sonata. I expect he has talked a good deal about it at Court, for, he writes, “the Royal Family wish to have the great treat I lately enjoyed”. [RMM, 260.]

Charlotte: Chopin and Moscheles were both commanded to go to St. Cloud. [RMM, 260.]

Moscheles: On the day when Kalkbrenner called I said, “Today I shall play on a piano of yours at St. Cloud”. He jumped up from his chair and declared that not a moment was to be lost; he must see if the instrument was in the best order. He also told me that the Duchess of Orleans, having taken lessons from him in playing and composition, knew perfectly well how to appreciate good music. At nine o’clock Chopin and I were called for by P. [Perthuis] and his charming wife. We all four went off in a pelting storm of rain, and felt more comfortable when we entered the warm and brilliantly lighted palace. We passed through some splendid apartments, to a ‘salon carré’, where only the Royal Family was assembled; the Queen at a round table, with an elegant work-basket before her (I wonder whether she was knitting a purse for me?). Next to her was Madame Adélaïde, the Duchess of Orleans, and the ladies of the Court. They one and all treated us kindly, as if we were old acquaintances. The Queen as well as Madame Adélaïde, declared that they still remembered with gratitude the delight I gave them at the Tuileries. The King came up to me to say the same thing, adding, he supposed an interval of between fifteen and sixteen years had elapsed since that time. I said he was quite correct, but thought all the while of the poor Count d’Artois, who had then been present. The Queen then asked if the instrument—a Pleyel—was placed as we liked it; was the lighting what we wanted? if the chairs were the right height, etc.; and was as anxious for our comfort as a Citizen Queen might well be. First of all, Chopin played a mélange of Nocturnos and Etudes, and was extolled and admired as an old Court favourite. I followed with some old and new Studies, and was honoured with similar applause. We then sat down together at the instrument, he again playing the bass, a thing he always insists on. The small audience now listened intently to my E flat major Sonata, which was interrupted by such exclamations as “divin! Délicieux!”. After the andante the Queen whispered to one of her suite: “Ne serait-il pas indiscret de le leur redemander?” which was tantamount to a command; so we played it again with increased abandon, and in the Finale gave ourselves up to a musical delirium.

Chopin’s enthusiasm throughout the whole performance of the piece must, I think, have kindled that of his hearers, who overwhelmed us both with compliments equally divided. Chopin played another solo as charmingly as before, and met with the same reception. I then improvised on some of Mozart’s sweetest airs, and finally dashed away at the Zauberflöte overture. Better than all the words of praise which flow so glibly from the lips of princes, was the king’s close attention during the entire evening. Chopin and I reveled like brothers in the triumph achieved by the individual talent of each, there was no tinge of jealousy on either side. At last, after being allowed to enjoy some refreshments, we left the palace at 11.30, this time only under a shower of compliments, for the rain had ceased, and we had a clear night. [RMM, 260-261.]

Charlotte: Naturally after this time Chopin and Moscheles were called upon almost daily in musical circles to repeat the Sonata, which came at last to be called and only known by the name of La Sonate. Shortly after this Moscheles is asked privately whether the legion d’honneur or any other mark of royal favor, would be valued as a reward for his playing at St. Cloud. He prefers something else to the order so lavishly bestowed, and receives a valuable dressing-case, on which are engraved the words “Donné par le Roi Louis-Philippe”. [RMM, 261.]

Reviews

L’Indépendant (December 16, 1835): 339.

***Le roi a fait inviter, mardi dernier, MM. Moscheles et Chopin à se rendre à Saint-Cloud, et ces deux grands artistes ont joué devant la cour réunie. Dans ce petit comité royal, ils ont exécuté les délicieuses études composées récemment par eux. La grande sonate à quatre mains de Moscheles a produit un effet tel que la reine a désiré en entendre une seconde fois l’andante. Chopin a ensuite improvisé sur la Folle de Grisar, et Moscheles sur divers motifs de Mozart, notamment l’ouverture de la Flûte enchantée (Zauber-floete), dont il a tiré un parti tout-à-fait digne de son double talent de pianiste et de compositeur. Ces deux grands artistes ont fixé l’attention et partagé l’enthousiasme de la cour pendant toute la soirée.

The Morning Post (November 5, 1839): 3.

CHOPIN AND MOSCHELES.—These distinguished pianists played at St. Cloud on Tuesday last, at a Royal soirée musicale, at which their French Majesties, Princess Adelaide, and the Duchess of Orleans were present. The soirée lasted till midnight. The two performers played alternately pieces of their composition, and afterwards gave a sonata for four hands, composed by M. Moscheles, the andantino of which was encored by the Queen. MM. Chopin and Moscheles terminated by two improvisations, the former taking for theme La Folle, and the latter several subjects from Mozart’s Don Juan.

Revue et Gazette Musicale de Paris (November 7, 1839): 454.

***Le roi vient de faire remettre par son aide-de-camp, à M. Moscheles, un magnifique nécessaire de voyage, et à M. Chopin une belle coupe en vermeil, pour prouver à ces grands artistes la satisfaction et le plaisir qu’ils ont procuré à Saint-Cloud à la famille royale.

Saunders’s News-Letter, and Daily Advertiser (November 7, 1839): 1.

[Same as issued in The Morning Post on November 5]

The Musical World, a Weekly Record of Musical Science, Literature, and Intelligence, vol. XII, (November 7, 1839): 439.

PARIS….The distinguished pianists Chopin and Moscheles, played at St. Cloud, on Tuesday week, at a soiree musicale, their Majesties, the Princess Adelaide and the Duchess of Orleans were present. They played, alternately, pieces of their own composition, and afterwards gave a sonata for four hands, composed by Moscheles, the andantino of which was encored by the Queen. Their performance terminated with two extemporaneous pieces. Moscheles took several subjects from Mozart’s opera of Don Juan; and Chopin the theme La Folie.

The Freeman’s Journal, and Daily Commercial Advertiser (November 9, 1839): 714.

MOSCHELES.—“On Tuesday last,” says the Gazette Musicale, “M. Moscheles and M. Chopin were invited to St. Cloud by order of  the King, wren these two great artists performed before the Royal family and the Court. They played the beautiful studies recently composed by them. Moscheles’s grand Sonato [sic] for four hands produced a great impression, and the Queen desired to hear the Andante a second time. Chopin then extemporised upon Grisar’s La Folle, and Moscheles upon several themes of Mozart, particularly the overture to the Zauberflote, from which he produces effects worthy of his double talent as a composer and pianist. They engaged tie attention and excited the admiration of the assembly during the whole evening.

The Athenæum (November 9, 1839): 847.

It is difficult to keep pace with the musical and dramatic life of Paris….M. Moscheles, at a soirée at St. Cloud, where his pianoforte-playing and compositions, alternately with those of M. Chopin, were highly relished and applauded.

The Atlas (November 9, 1839): 714.

The celebrated pianists, Chopin and Moscheles, at St. Cloud on Tuesday last, at a royal soirée musicale, at which their French Majesties, Princess Adelaide, and the Duchess of Orleans were present. The soirée lasted till midnight. The two performers played alternately pieces of their composition, and afterwards gave a sonata for four hands, composed by M. Moscheles, the andantino of which was encored by the Queen. MM. Chopin and Moscheles terminated by two improvisations, the former taking for theme La Folle, and the latter several subjects from Mozart’s Don Juan.

The Musical World, a Weekly Record of Musical Science, Literature, and Intelligence, vol. XII, (November 14, 1839): 445.

A French Journal alludes to the performance of M. Moscheles at St. Cloud, in the following terms:—

“M. Moscheles is in Paris. This illustrious pianist, so continually extolled by the English press, has vouchsafed, with a peculiar complaisance, to come and exhibit his powers among us. Before having heard M. Moscheles, we expected to have found him one of those eccentric geniuses that move and transport us by an execution by turns graceful or electrifying. Having heard him, our faith in the English press is considerably modified. M. Moscheles is a third-rate pianist; neither more nor less. His heavy banging of the keys must have singularly astonished her Majesty the Queen of the French. Age may possibly have enfeebled the intelligence of this too much vaunted artist—we can, however, make this assertion, that there are in Paris at the present day five hundred pianists, one and all quite as capable as M. Moscheles of executing Fantasias, Studies, Capriccios, Divertisements, Sonatos, or Concertos.”

Neu Zeitschrift für Musik (November 15, 1839): 160.

***Die Gazette musicale berichtet in der Nummer vom 31. Oct.: „Der Kònig hat vorigen Dienstag die H H. Moscheles und Chopin nach St. Cloud einladen lassen, wo diese beiden großen Künstler vor dem versammelten Hof spielten. Sie trugen vor diesem hohen Auditorium von ihren neben köstlichen Etuden vor. Die große vierhándige Sonate von Moscheles brachte eine solche Wirkung vor, daß die Kónigin noch einmal um Wiederholung des Andante hat. Chopin improvisirte heirauf úber Themas úber „La Folle“ v. Grifar, und Moscheles úber virschiedene von Mozart. Den ganzen Abend bewies der Hof den beiden Kúnstlern die gróßste Aufmerksamkeit.”

Der Humorist (November 17, 1839): 923.

(Moscheles und Chopin in Paris,) Die Gazette musicale berichtet in der Nummer vom 31. Okt.: »Der König hat vorigen Dienstag die HH. Moscheles und Chopin nach St. Cloud einladen lassen, wo diese beiden großen Künstler vor dem versammelten Hof spielten. Sie trugen vor diesem hohen Auditorium von ihren neuen köstlichen Etüden vor. Die große, vier händige Sonate von Moscheles brachte eine solche Wirkung vor, daß die Königin noch einmal die Wiederholung des Andante verlangt. Chopin improvisirte hieraus über Themas über »La Folle« von Grisar, und Moscheles über verschiedene von Mozart. Den ganzen Abend bewies der Hof den beiden Künstlern die größte Aufmerksamkeit. Sie haben vom Könige, Ersterer ein sehr prachtvolles Reisenecessaire und Letzterer einen schönen Becher, als Beweis des Vergnügens, welches sie der königlichen Familie verschafft haben, erhalten.

Neu Zeitschrift für Musik (November 19, 1839): 164.

Paris.—Der Kónig hat Hrn. Moscheles ein kostbares Reisenecessair, wie Hrn. Chopin einen silbernen Potal durch seinen Adjutanten für ihr Spiel in St. Cloud über sendet.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (November 20, 1839): 932.

Paris. Im Palais von St. Cloud, wo der König der Franzosen am 31. Oktober ankam, hat eine musikalische Soirée Statt gefunden, wobei die Herren Chopin und Moscheles sich vor der königlichen Familie hören liessen, welche so viel Vergnügen an den glänzenden Talenten dieser Herren gefunden hat, dass alle höchste und hohe Anwesenden bis Mitternacht zuhörten. Erst trugen beide Künstler jeder seine eigenen Komposizionen vor, dann spielten sie zusammen die vierhändige Sonate von Moscheles, deren Andantinodie Königinnoch einmal verlangte. Zuletzt improvisirten beideVirtuosen, Chopin auf ein Thema aus la Ä Moscheles über mehrere Motive aus Don Juan. Der König, die Königin, die Prinzessin Adelaide, der Herzog von Orleans haben ihnen mehrmals lebhaften Beifall gespendet. (Journal des Debats. 3. November)

Jahrbücher des deutschen National-Vereins für Musik und ihre Wissenschaft (December 19, 1839): 304.

Kürzlich bestanden Moscheles und Chopin am Königlichen Hofe zu Paris einen ganz eigenen Kampf; beide mußten sich dort zu gleicher Zeit hören lassen ; Moscheles fantasirte über Themen von Mozart ; Chopin spielte hauptsächlich Etuden. Reiche Geschenke lohnte ihre Leistungen