n.d. January 1828

Breakfast at Sir Walter Scott

Edinburgh: Sir Walter Scott’s Residence, 6 Shandwick Place

Time: Morning, Ten o’Clock: Assembly Rooms

 

✗Programme

Song, ‘Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu’  
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu’Mr. Moscheles 
Principal Instrumentalists: Mr. Moscheles

———————————

Notes: The concert took place between 18-24 January.


Charlotte: To the delight of Moscheles, Sir Walter sent an immediate answer to his letter of recommendation, saying that, being confined to his house with an attack of gout, he hoped Moscheles and his wife would come to breakfast, instead of waiting for him to visit them.

Next morning, at 10 am., they called at No. 6, Shandwick Place, where the illustrious man was staying for the winter, with his second, and unmarried, daughter. [RMM, 135-136.]

Moscheles: He opened the door himself…and welcomed us heartily: he was suffering from gout, and walked with a stick. Before we had taken off our things we felt completely at home, and my wife’s anticipated awe of the great man had entirely vanished. We sat down to breakfast forthwith, and a genuine good Scotch breakfast we had, served on handsome silver plate, by two servants in powder and livery. Scott’s conversation was extremely animated and delightful: he understands German, and is thoroughly versed in our literature, and an enthusiastic worshipper of Goethe.  He told us many anecdotes, but when he asked me, “How do you like my cousin the piper?—you know, we Scotch are all cousins”—I am afraid my answer must have done violence to his sense of music, which by nature, was very limited. It was impossible for me to pretend to any enthusiasm for the bagpipes. Sir Walter had expected as much, but expatiated on the wonderful effect the national music has on the native Highlanders, arguing that a wandering piper would attract crowds in the streets of Edinburgh; also, that in battle the sound of bagpipes would inspire Scotch soldiers with a desperate valour. “You should hear my cousin the piper play and sing ‘The Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,’ but with the Gaelic words”, said he; “those words are the only appropriate ones to convey spirit and animation, but the melody itself carries one away”.  He began to hum the tune, and beat time on the carpet with his stick, which was always by his side; “but,” added he, “the whole thing is wrong; I sing so badly: my cousin, who has just come in, must play the tune for us upstairs in the drawing-room”. Accordingly, we went upstairs; the cousin played me the subject; I extemporized upon it, and completely won the heart of our ever-youthful-minded and genial host. This was the prelude to my playing several Scotch airs, which I had to vary and interweave in all manner of ways. At last we parted, after a delightful visit, ever memorable to us; the amiability and sweetness of Scott’s manner are never to be forgotten. Kindness, indeed, is written in every feature, and speaks in every word. that falls from him. He treated my wife like a pet daughter, kissed her on the cheek when we went away, and promised he would come and see the children, and bring them a book. This he did, and his gift was the Tales of a Grandfather. He had written in the title page, “To Adolphus and Emily Moscheles, from the Grandfather” . [RMM, 136-137.]

Reviews

The Edinburgh Observer (January 25, 1828): 2.

Mr. MOSCHELES.

——

We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers.

Mr and Mrs Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropt [sic]. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano-forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle-field. In short the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.

When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real ossian, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.

Caledonian Mercury (January 26, 1828): 3.

MR. MOSCHELES.

We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers.

Mr and Mrs Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropt. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle-field. In short the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.

When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real bard-like spirit, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.—Observer.

The Morning Post (January 29, 1828): 3.

Mr. MOSCHELES.

(FROM THE EDINBURGH OBSERVER.)

We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers.

Mr. and Mrs. Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir WALTER SCOTT a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir WALTER quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir WALTER’S Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropped. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes, to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle-field. In short, the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with OSSIAN, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.

The Times (January 29, 1828): 3.

MR. MOSCHELES.

[line]

We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers.

Mr. and Mrs. Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropt [sic]. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano-forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle-field. In short the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.

When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr. Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real bard-like spirit, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.—Edinburgh paper.

The Morning Chronicle (January 30, 1828): 4.

Mr. MOSCHELLES, the celebrated performer on the piano-forte, is on a tour in Scotland. A few days since he visited Sir WALTER SCOTT, who introduced the subject of the music of the Highlands to his visitor, and particularly alluded to the find old gathering “Pibroch o’Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class. Mr. MOSCHELLES was very anxious to hear it, and a friend of Sir WALTER’S present though not a singer, gave the melody in a manner sufficiently expressive for the Professor to understand its full intended effect. Shortly after Mr. MOSCHELLES sat down to the piano forte, and, after a short extemporaneous introduction, Sir WALTER and his company were astonished and delighted by his bursting forth with the celebrated Highland Melody, in all its wild force and fury. The Musician, who had never heard the melody but once and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the Highland melody throughout all its various beauties, as if he had learnt the harp with OSSIAN.

The Inverness Courier (January 30, 1828): 2.

When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real ossian, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.

Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle (February 3, 1828): 3.

Mr. MOSCHELLES, the celebrated performer on the piano-forte, is on a tour in Scotland. A few days since he visited Sir WALTER SCOTT, who introduced the subject of the music of the Highlands to his visitor, and particularly alluded to the find old gathering “Pibroch o’Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class. Mr. MOSCHELLES was very anxious to hear it, and a friend of Sir WALTER’S present though not a singer, gave the melody in a manner sufficiently expressive for the Professor to understand its full intended effect. Shortly after Mr. MOSCHELLES sat down to the piano forte, and, after a short extemporaneous introduction, Sir WALTER and his company were astonished and delighted by his bursting forth with the celebrated Highland Melody, in all its wild force and fury. The Musician, who had never heard the melody but once and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the Highland melody throughout all its various beauties, as if he had learnt the harp with OSSIAN.

The Kaleidoscope: or, Literary and scientific mirror, vol. 6 (February 5, 1828): 262.

MR. MOSCHELES.

We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers.

Mr. and Mrs. Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropt. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano-forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle field. In short, the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.

When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real ossian, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.

The Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser (February 6, 1828): 8.

MR MOSCHELES.—We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers. Mr and Mrs. Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’ Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropped. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano-forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle field. In short, the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill. When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud, amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real bard-like spirit, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.—Edinburgh Paper.

Hull Packet (February 12, 1828): 2.

MR MOSCHELES.—We are enabled, by the attention of a correspondent, to give some instances of the extraordinary talents of this great musician as an improvisatore in his art, which we think may be interesting to our readers. Mr and Mrs. Moscheles were breakfasting with Sir Walter Scott a few days ago, when the conversation turned upon the music of the Highlands. Sir Walter quoted the fine old gathering, “Pibroch o’Donald Dhu,” as being one of the boldest and most spirited of its martial class, and requested a gentleman present to endeavour to sing it. His guest complied as he best could, though no doubt a little embarrassed at being summoned so suddenly to exhibit as a vocalist before one of the first musicians in Europe. However, he contrived to sing the air, with Sir Walter’s Tyrtæan verses, in such a manner as to make the great pianist understand and relish it; and, after repeating it once or twice at his request, the subject was dropped. On adjourning to the drawing-room, the musician sat down to the piano forte; and, after a few prefatory movements, the company were astonished and delighted when the soul-stirring Highland melody burst forth in all its wild force and fury! It was, perhaps, never played at the head of a clan before battle, with more passionate energy. The mode of treating it was unspeakably fine. Now, the full roar of hostile conflict pealing forth—anon, wild wailings arose, significant of woe and death—then the rapid mustering of friends and foes, to the rescue—now, kindred airs, though different, indicated the approach of other clans to the battle-field. In short, the musician, who had never heard the melody but once, and who was previously almost a stranger to the very existence of the bold race whose energies it spoke, exhibited the whole soul of Highland melody, throughout all its varying struggles and emotions, as if he had learned from infancy to sweep the harp with Ossian, and burnt and wept all his life with the children of the mist and desert. It was quite clear the great harmonist felt in whose presence he was performing; and it may well be said, that he never before exerted himself with more devoted skill.—When this exquisite display was over, Sir Walter chanced to allude to the effects of the various martial sounds which reached his ears, when the evening watch was set of Allied troops in Paris, after the battle of Waterloo. Seated on the summit of a small eminence near the village of St. Cloud. amidst the calm of a French summer’s night, he described the mingling sounds, in the distance, of the instruments of almost all the nations in the worlds, rising in strange and wild harmony around, as producing an effect upon him such as he should never forget. This led to a disquisition upon military music in general, and that to a request from Sir Walter that Mr Moscheles would indulge the company with some of the martial airs of the Continent. He immediately assented, modestly saying, that he knew very many of them, as he had been often employed in their composition by the Emperor of Austria. He sat down again, accordingly, to his instrument, and produced the most admirable melange of every sort of military music that can be conceived. Several of the airs his auditors knew, many they heard for the first time; but the wonderful facility and grace with which he arranged and combined them—passing through more than imaginable variety of keys and measures, yet ever maintaining one uniform tone of high martial feeling—excited the profoundest admiration. They all agreed, that though they had often heard before what were termed extempore fantasias, yet the real bard-like spirit, which alone gives value to such efforts of improvisation, they then listened to for the first time.—Edinburgh paper

Laibacher Zeitung (March 6, 1828): 80.

Herr Moscheles, der sich gegenwärtig in Schottland befindet, frühstückte neulich bei Sir Walter Scott. Auf die Bitte des Leßtern sang einer der Anwesenden ein altgälisches Lied: Piobrach au Donuil dhu xc. Hr. Moscheles began sich in eine Nebenstube, seßte sich an ein Fortepiano, und improvisirte in wenigen Augenblicken daß Lied des hochländischen Clans in aller seiner kunstvollen Eigenthümlichkeit und Kraft, zur Freude und Bewunderung aller Anwesenden.

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (1828): 55.

EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF A DILETTANTE

….

[January] 29th. I am glad to learn, though by no means surprised at the circumstance, that M. Moscheles has been so hospitably received at Abbotsford, by Sir Walter Scott. This most talented writer knows what is due to talent, and never neglects to give practical proofs of his knowledge. The host and his visitor were equally pleased with each other.

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (February 1828): 58.

Mr. Moscheles gave three concerts. The first happened on the night of the Italian opera, which deprived him of the aid of many orchestral performers, and produced a very unsatisfactory audience, in relation to profit, but a most satisfactory one so far as the taste and intelligence of the auditors were concerned. The report made by his select company, spread his reputation with great rapidity, and his second concert exhibited the large Assembly Room very nearly filled with an audience of the first rank in Edinburgh. His performance on this occasion excited so much admiration, and became so much the subject of conversation amongst the lovers of music, that his third concert was full to overflowing. This progressive attraction of public attention was certainly in the highest degree complimentary to Moscheles’ talents; and the effect which he subsequently produced on a visit to Sir Walter Scott, when he treated extemporaneously some national music suggested to him on the occasion, so raised him in the estimation of this northern metropolis, that he is now considered as the most eminent pianist who has ever appeared amongst them. Miss Eliza Paton sang with great effect in all the three concerts, and not unfrequently reminded the audience of the Madame Pasta, whose style she makes her model. Mr. Dewar distinguished himself as a leader of much judgment and ability.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (April 30, 1828): 300.

Moscheles und Walter Scott.

Hr. Moscheles halte vor Kurzem eine Kunstreise nach Edinburg unternommen; er gab dort Concert: es war nur wenig besucht. Sein Spiel hatte jedoch den Anwesenden so sehr gefallen, dass der Künstler sich veranlasst sah, ein zweytes zu veranstalten, das schon weit besuchter, als das erste war. Ein drittes Concert wurde vor einer höchst zahlreichen und so entzückten Versammlung gegeben, dass ihn diese nördliche Hauptstadt für den ersten Pianisten erklärt, der je erschienen ist. Bey dieser Gelegenheit besuchte Hr. Moscheles auch den gewesenen grossen Unbekannten in Abbotsford, und wurde von ihm, wie das zu er warten stand, sehr freundlich empfangen. Die Rede kam natürlich bald auf schottische Volkslieder und man sang dem Gaste mehre solche, ihm noch ganz unbekannte Bardengesänge vor. Sogleich setzte sich der Componist an das Instrument und phantasirte über diese Volksgesänge so, dass der vielgewandle Dichter in Bewunderung ausbrach. Kurz Beyde fanden gegenseitig, was sie geh o fit hatten und schieden gleich befriedigt von einander.

26 January 1828

Ignaz Moscheles’ Morning Concert

Edinburgh: Assembly Rooms

Time: Morning, One o’Clock

Tickets: 5s

 

Programme

Part I  
Overture Mozart
Piano Concerto No.2 in E flat majorMr. MoschelesMoscheles
From Tancredi  
Recit., ‘Tu che accendi questo core’
Aria, ‘Di tanti palpiti’
Miss E. PatonRossini
A selection of published and unpublished StudiesMr. MoschelesMoscheles
Cavatina, ‘I’ve been roaming’Miss E. PatonC. Horn
Fantasia Concertante on a Romance of Blangini for Voice, Piano, Flute, HarpMiss E. Paton, Mr. Moscheles, Miss Yaniewicz, Mr. PlattMoscheles
Part II  
Overture Beethoven
Aria, ‘Il braccio mio conquise’Miss E. PatonNiccolini
Grand Piano Variations on a Military March with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations)Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Song, ‘Gloomy Winter’s now awa’ ’ (by desire)Miss E. Paton 
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘Pibroch of Donald Dhu’Mr. Moscheles 
Principal Vocalists: Miss E. Paton
Principal Instrumentalists: Miss Yaniewicz; Messrs. Moscheles, Platt
Leader: Mr. James Dewar; Conductor:  Mr. Hargitt, jun.

———————————

Charlotte: …the two next [the previous concert on January 8, and this concert] concerts were filled to overflowing. [RMM, 135.]

Moscheles: After our visit, Sir Walter was unfortunately confined to his bed with a fresh attack of gout; he got better, however, and on the occasion of my third concert, which was a matinee, to the surprise of a crowded and fashionable audience, Sir Walter stepped into the room before the music began. My wife…sat as usual in a remote corner of the room; Scott, however, found her out instantly, and sat down by her side, drawing upon her the envious eyes of many a fair beholder. His hearty bravos and cheers, when I played, stimulated the audience to redouble their applause, which reached a climax when I gave them the Scotch airs. Between the parts he asked my wife if she knew Bürger’s poem ‘Der Dichter liebt den guten Wein’, and, on her answering in the affirmative, he told her how he delighted in this poem, which he had translated into English, adding, “Would you like to have it? I shall send it you”. She begged him to recite the song in the original; this, to my wife’s great delight, he willingly assented to, while all around listened eagerly. [RMM, 137.]

Advertisements

Caledonian Mercury (January 21, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

———

MR MOSCHELES

HAS the honour to announce, that having been requested by several Families of distinction, to perform once more before leaving Edinburgh, he will give a

MORNING CONCERT,

On SATURDAY next, the 26th inst.

The particulars of which will be specified in the bills.

Tickets 5s, each, bot be had at the principal Music Warehouses.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 21, 1828): 3.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES

HAS the honour to announce, that having been requested by several families of distinction, to perform once more before leaving Edinburgh, he will give a

MORNING CONCERT,

On Saturday next, the 26th inst., the particulars of which will be specified in the bills.

Tickets 5s, each, bot be had at the principal Music Warehouses.

The Scotsman (January 23, 1828): 4.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES has the honour to announce, that, having been requested by several Families of distinction, to perform once more before leaving Edinburgh, he will give a

MORNING CONCERT,

On Saturday next, the 26h inst. at One o’clock,

When he will perform

1st. CONCERTO (E major) in which is introduced

the British Grenadier’s March.

2d. A Selection of his published and unpublished

Studies in various Styles.

3d. (By particular desire) the VARIATIONS on

the FALL of PARIS.

4th. EXTEMPORANEOUS PERFORMANCE

on the Grand Piano-forte.

MISS E. PATON

Will sing several of her next favourite Songs.

Leader, Mr J. Dewar.

Conductor, Mr. Hargitt, Jun.

Tickets, 5s. each, to be had at the principal Music

Warehouses.

Caledonian Mercury (January 24, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

———

MR MOSCHELES,

(PROFESSOR OF THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC,)

HAS the honour to announce, that, having been requested by several Families of distinction, to perform once more before leaving Edinburgh, he will give a

MORNING CONCERT,

On SATURDAY next, the 26th inst. at one o’clock P.M.

———

ACT FIRST.

Overture—Mozart.

Concerto (E major) in which is introduced the British Gre-

nadiers’ March, Grand Piano Forte, Mr MOSCHELES—

Moscheles.

Recitativo ed Aria, Miss E. PATON, “Di tanti palpiti”—

Rossini.

A Selection of published and unpublished STUDIES, in va-

rious Styles, Grand Piano Forte, Mr MOSCHELES—

Moscheles.

Song, Miss E. Paton, “I’ve been roaming”—Horn.

Concertante, for Voice, Piano Forte, Harp, and Flute,

founded on a favourite Romance of Blangini, Miss E.

PATON, Mr MOSCHELES, Miss PAULINE YANIEWICZ, and

Mr PLATT—Moscheles.

ACT SECOND.

Overture—Beethoven.

Aria, Miss E. Paton, “Il braccio mio”—Niccolini.

(By particular desire) the Variations on “The Fall of Paris,”

Grand Piano Forte, Mr MOSCHELES—Moscheles.

Song, Miss E. PATON, “Gloomy Winter,” (by desire.)

EXTEMPORANEOUS PERFORMANCE on the Grand Piano

Forte, Mr MOSCHELES.

Leader, Mr J. DEWAS.

Conductor, Mr HARGITT, Jun.

Tickets, 5s. each, to be had at the principal Music Ware-

houses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 24, 1828): 3.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES, (Professor of the Royal Academy of Music), has the honour to announce, that. having been requested by several Families of distinction, to perform once more before leaving Edinburgh; he will give a

MORNING CONCERT,

On SATURDAY next, the 26th inst. at one o’clock P.M.

ACT I.

Overture,Mozart:
Concerto (E. Major, in which is introduced 
     The British Grenadiers March, Grand Pi- 
     ano-Forte, Mr Moscheles.           .         .Moscheles:
Recitativo ed aria, Miss E, Paton, “Di tanti 
     palpiti,”         .           .            .            .Rossini:
A selection of published and unpublished 
     Studies, in various styles, Grand Piano- 
     Forte, Mr Moscheles.            .              .Moscheles:
Song, Miss E. Paton, “I’ve been roam- 
    ing,”      .           .           .            .          .Horn:
Concertante, for Voice, Piano-Forte, Harp, 
     and Flute, founded on a favourite Ro-  
     mance of Blangini, Miss E. Paton, Mr 
     Moscheles, Miss Pauline Yaniewicz, and 
     Mr Platt,           .             .               .Moscheles:

ACT II.

Overture,Beethoven:
Aria, Miss E. Paton, “Il braccio mio.”Niccolini.
(By particular desire), The Variations on the 
     Fall of Paris, Grand Piano-Forte, Mr 
     Moscheles,          .          .          .          .Moscheles:
Song, Miss E. Paton, “Gloomy Winter,” 
     (by desire.) 
Extemporaneous Performance on the Grand 
     Piano- Forte, Mr Moscheles.           

———

Leader, Mr J. DEWAR,

Conductor, Mr HARGITT, Junr.

Tickets 5s. each, to be had at the principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

Reviews

Caledonian Mercury (January 28, 1828): 3.

MR MOSCHELES’ CONCERT.

Till Saturday last, when we were happy to see that Mr Moscheles was attended by a numerous auditory, the public of Edinburgh really had not afforded this gentleman any very convincing practical demonstration of the sense which they entertained of his extraordinary talents. Our various cotemporaries [sic], however, have for some time past teemed with the most eloquent panegyrics on his performance; so much so indeed that a person totally ignorant of his merits might perhaps be disposed to infer that the praises lavished upon him in all probability savoured of extravagance, while such as were previously aware of the exalted reputation which he has so long maintained on the Continent, as well as in London, would very naturally be inclined to think that they were somewhat superfluous. For our own parts, we conceived his established character to be such, that we were ready at once to admit his claim to the very highest honours of his profession, without going into any minute scrutiny of his innumerable excellencies.—Nevertheless, not to appear to have been altogether inattentive observers, though without any prospect of being able to add anything to what has been already so much better expressed  elsewhere, we may venture to say a few words on the subject. We believe it to be generally acknowledged in the musical world, that Mr Moscheles, in most respects, throws every other great piano forte player into the shade—that his execution and his extemporaneous powers are more wonderful than those of Kalkbrenner—and that, if he does not excel Cramer in taste and purity of expression, the superior command which he has over the instrument, enables him to give such passages as require delicacy with more attention to the minutiæ, which that expression not unfrequently requires. In some respects he is altogether incomparable. His shade is perfection itself, and nothing can equal the exquisite tone which he produces, the fairy lightness of his touch, and the thunders of effect which he calls forth from the lower part of the instrument. Such is the distinctness of his articulation, that even in passages of the most inconceivable rapidity, no subdivision of sound, however minute, ever escapes the ear. Into the mysteries of his craft it is out of our power to follow him; and we can only say that the impression which his performance produced was a feeling of astonishment how one individual could accomplish so much, and how any single instrument could be rendered susceptible of such complicated harmony, and such infinite variety of effect. The means by which these ends are attained are in some instances beyond our comprehension; but we know that they can only be the result of the most intense labour, and that we see in Mr Moscheles a person of a powerful and well-organised mind, the energies of which must have been judiciously directed and indefatigably exercised in the acquirement of the art to which he has devoted himself.

On Saturday last his powers were exhibited to the greatest advantage, and in every possible way—not only in concertos and accompaniments, but in studies or exercises, the difficulties of which we should suppose were beyond the compass of every one except himself. What delighted us most, as a finished specimen of his performance, was his variations to “the fall of Paris;” but his extemporaneous display, in which he introduced the “Pibroch of Donald Dhu,” which he played with a strong feeling of nationality, was the most interesting, and perhaps the most surprising manifestations of his almost incredible skill. Miss E. Paton contributed her able assistance, and sang “Di tanti palpiti,” and “Il braccio mio conquise,” a la Pasta, in a style very little inferior to that of the great vocalist herself. Miss Paton has made great progress in her profession since last year, and we were particularly struck with her very correct pronunciation of the Italian, upon which the beauty of that style of singing so much depends.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 28, 1828): 3.

The appearance of the Assembly Room on Saturday was very gratifying, and shewed that Mr Moscheles only required to be known to become attractive. His vast powers were almost unknown to us before he came here, which may perhaps account for the comparative failure of his other concerts. The fame of Cramer and Kalkbrenner hail long preceded them through their works, which were almost the only text books used by amateurs, Moscheles, on the contrary, had since his arrival in England a few years ago, published but little music which could come within the grasp of young ladies’ fingers: and, therefore, in comparison with the others, he was an entire stranger to us. All who have heard his compositions, and his performance of them, will reproach themselves for not having sooner become acquainted with his works; and every one we are sure will agree that he is superior unquestionably to all the pianoforte players they ever listened to. His performance on Saturday was, if possible, greater than on either of the other occasions. In his concerto he produced an effect like that of two performers, so massive and superb was his style of playing it. This concerto is in the most brilliant of all keys, the key of E major. He does not string together passages of show-off execution which have no sort of meaning, and leave no permanent impression. He gives out his subject gradually, expatiates upon it, but never loses sight of it for one moment, so that when brought to a close there is nothing awanting [sic], no passage unresolved, no idea not clearly and fully developed. The adagio we especially admire; it is just such a one as Hadyn [sic]would have written had he been thoroughly acquainted with the pianoforte. We are at a loss whether most to praise the composition or the performance of it—perhaps the latter. The concluding rondo on the Grenadiers March is one of the very finest and most effective places we ever heard. Into what a variety of forms did he throw the march, transforming it from a meagre and common-place air into a highly wrought and finished composition? He performed it with surpassing brilliancy. Miss Paton, Mr Moscheles, and Mr Platt, went through their parts to admiration. The Romance, on which this piece is founded, strongly reminded us of “Batti, batti,” and of course is beautiful. Mr Moscheles has rendered it very attractive by his charming arrangement of it. The studies were of too abstract a nature to please the multitude; and therefore they were listened to, with one or two exception, with apathy. The last one which Moscheles played was truly great. It may well be called “The Conflict of Demons;” for it was wild, unearthly, and terrible. If put into score for an orchestra, the effect must be prodigious; indeed, an eminent musician, after hearing M. Moscheles play it at Vienna, obtained permission, and arranged it for a full band, the effect of which, we understand, was quite electrifying.  The Fall of Paris was given in his very best manner. And last, not least, his Extemporaneous Fantasia, was exquisitely beautiful—full of original ideas, and of novel and striking effects.

Miss E. Paton sung two well known songs, in a manner calculated to raise her higher in every one’s opinion “Il braccio mio,” which Pasta enchanted us with not long ago, was given by Miss P. in a style of uncommon, excellence. The light and shade were admirable, and the execution perfect, and we hesitate not to say, that we have only heard two ladies who are superior to Miss Eliza in “Di tanti palpiti,” namely Madame Pasta, and Miss Paton.

The Edinburgh Observer (January 29, 1828): 4.

MR MOSCHELES’ MORNING CONCERT.

——

Our first thought on entering the Assembly Room on Saturday morning was, “what may be the annual consumpt [sic] of black velvet and broad ribbons in this city?” here and there we could discern a bald head and a pair of whiskers, which may, in general, be  taken as symptoms of the male sex; but from the front of the orchestra, to the very furthest extremity of the room under the canopy, almost every inch was occupied by a dense population of bonnets, muffs, tippets, and mud-boots,—strong presumptive evidence that female wearers were concealed under them. We say presumptive; for at present it is almost impossible to decide positively whether ladies actually accompany their bonnets or not. All one can say is,—there walks, stands, or sits, a huge velvet structure, decorated with ribbons as broad as the pavement; but that any human being exists under or therein no man can, without rashness and temerity, affirm. Still, we grant that the belief is not unreasonable; for even in our own day we recollect when it was customary for ladies to wear bonnets on their heads; and by reversing the proposition, we see no difficulty in concluding that bonnets may now wear ladies under them. If so, we should imagine that there could not be less than 700 or 800 people at this concert; a circumstance in which we rejoice greatly, for two reasons—1st, Because Mr Moscheles’ merits deserved such a return; and 2dly, because we hope it will frighten five-sixths of those who were present, from ever touching a piano-forte,—grand, cabinet, or square, for the rest of their  natural lives. As matters stand, piano-forte playing is not only a drug that few can swallow, but an absolute nuisance which has reached such an alarming height, that the Legislature seriously contemplate taxing it, after the manner of hair-powder and hawkers’ licences. Some remedial measure is indispensable; for no. man who has any regard to his auditory nerves, can. With safety venture to call on any family where there are unmarried daughters, upwards of twelve months old: let him use what caution he may, mamma will find a reason in the nature of things, why Miss should exhibit—if Miss herself has not already shewn, that in every thing but taste, time, feeling, and expression, she is a Saint Cecilia. As for tea-parties, bun-meetings, and other snares of that description, we look upon it as a temptation of Providence to venture near them; or at any rate never show face till supper is just about to be announced, taking especial care to shy off before there is any chance of the torture being renewed. We have yet another ground for being satisfied with the full attendance at this concert; viz., that the chosen few, who, in this city, really love the art, and cultivate the instrument, would be sure to be among the crowd, and carry home with them hints for improvement, and examples for practice, which they would in vain  seek for elsewhere .there is not, perhaps, half-a-dozen in Edinburgh who have advanced far enough to profit by a set of lessons from this great master; but there are not a few, who, by observing his style, may improve their own—and correct heir faults by assiduous study, and humble imitation of so perfect a model.

As on the former concerts, Mr Moscheles restricted his performances of his works. The concerto in the major of E. is splendid composition, excelling any one we have heard him perform, and susceptible, we should imagine, of prodigious effect when accompanied by a full orchestra. Among all the intricacy and profuse embellishment, with which every theme is worked up, it is astonishing to observe how closely the motive is adhered to, and brought into bold and prominent relief. The slow movement is a perfect pattern of. The sound, sold, and severe counterpoint of the best German school. The “studies,” he performed are, with the exception of the second, which is an admirable piece of writing, scarcely adapted for a popular concert. His variations on the “Fall of Paris” every one has heard, but never formed an adequate idea of, until he played it. The extemporaneous performance was as rapid, brilliant, and effective as any of the rest; but we are by no means inclined to regard such feats in the miraculous light that some people view them in a  much more moderate proficient in counterpoint, with a tolerable acquaintance with the phrases of piano-forte music, and a fair share of manual dexterity, will play variations on a ground nearly ad libitum; although we verify  believe that no man living could introduce  or execute such difficult extemporaneous passages as some of Mr Moscheles’. The Concertante, on a romance of Blangini, we regret to say—for it is an air of surpassing beauty—was marred by a series of the most untoward accidents. The symphony had scarcely commenced, when the strings of the harp began snapping with the most provoking perseverance and alacrity; and by the time matters were adjusted, the piece was just about concluding. Miss Paton distinguished herself greatly in this air, as well as in “Il braccio.”—In the latter, and in “Di t anti palpiti,” it was evident that she had carefully treasured up and studied Madame Pasta’s manner and decorations; and although we would not offend sound sense by comparing her with that matchless woman, we have no hesitation to say that she is a pupil every way worthy of such a pattern. She has made greater progress within the last six months than she had done ever since she appeared in public. If time adds strength and volume to her voice, she will soon have no rival out of London, and but a few in it.—

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (February 1828): 58.

Mr. Moscheles gave three concerts. The first happened on the night of the Italian opera, which deprived him of the aid of many orchestral performers, and produced a very unsatisfactory audience, in relation to profit, but a most satisfactory one so far as the taste and intelligence of the auditors were concerned. The report made by his select company, spread his reputation with great rapidity, and his second concert exhibited the large Assembly Room very nearly filled with an audience of the first rank in Edinburgh. His performance on this occasion excited so much admiration, and became so much the subject of conversation amongst the lovers of music, that his third concert was full to overflowing. This progressive attraction of public attention was certainly in the highest degree complimentary to Moscheles’ talents; and the effect which he subsequently produced on a visit to Sir Walter Scott, when he treated extemporaneously some national music suggested to him on the occasion, so raised him in the estimation of this northern metropolis, that he is now considered as the most eminent pianist who has ever appeared amongst them. Miss Eliza Paton sang with great effect in all the three concerts, and not unfrequently reminded the audience of the Madame Pasta, whose style she makes her model. Mr. Dewar distinguished himself as a leader of much judgment and ability.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (April 30, 1828): 300.

Hr. Moscheles halte vor Kurzem eine Kunstreise nach Edinburg unternommen; er gab dort Concert: es war nur wenig besucht. Sein Spiel hatte jedoch den Anwesenden so sehr gefallen, dass der Künstler sich veranlasst sah, ein zweytes zu veranstalten, das schon weit besuchter, als das erste war. Ein drittes Concert wurde vor einer höchst zahlreichen und so entzückten Versammlung gegeben, dass ihn diese nördliche Hauptstadt für den ersten Pianisten erklärt, der je erschienen ist.

18 January 1828

Ignaz Moscheles’ Second Concert

Edinburgh: Assembly Rooms

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock

Tickets: 7s., Sets of four for 1 Guinea

 

Programme

Part I  
Overture Mozart
Song, ‘Orynthia’Mr. NoakesBishop
Piano Concerto No.2 in E flat majorMr. MoschelesMoscheles
Duet, ‘Borne in yon blaze’Miss E. Paton, Mr. NoakesDr. J. Clarke
Song, ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’  Miss E. PatonBishop
Piano Fantasia, Anticipations of Scotland 
with Orchestral Accompaniments
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
  
Part II  
Overture Beethoven
From La donna del lago  
‘Elena! oh tu, che chiamo!
Miss E. PatonRossini
Piano Fantasia, The Recollections of Ireland  
with Orchestral Accompaniments
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
SongMr. Noakes 
Song, ‘Gloomy Winter’s now awa’ ’Miss E. Paton 
Free Piano FantasiaMr. Moscheles 
Instrumental Finale Haydn
Principal Vocalists: Miss E. Paton; Mr. Noakes
Principal Instrumentalists: Mr. Moscheles
Leader: Mr. James Dewar; Conductor:  Mr. Hargitt, jun.

———————————

Programme Notes: The reviews do not clarify whether Mr. Noakes sang ‘Orynthia’ in the first part or the second

Encore: Song, ‘Orynthia—Mr. Noakes—Bishop


Charlotte: …the two next [this concert, and the concert on January 26] concerts were filled to overflowing. [RMM, 135.]

Advertisements

The Edinburgh Observer (January 11, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS,

GEORGE STREET.

——

MR MOSCHELES, Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, has the honour to announce, that his

SECOND and LAST

CONCERT

Will take place on FRIDAY next, 18th January 1828, when he will perform—

  1. CONCERTO (E flat) on the Grand Piano-forte, in which he will introduce a favourite Scotch Melody.
  2. (By particular desire) the new FANTASIA, called—“Anticipations of Scotland,” with full Accompaniments.
  3. An EXTEMPORE FANTASIA on the Piano-forte.

Further particulars will be announced in due time.

Tickets, 7s. each, or Sets of Four for a Guinea, to be had at the Principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

Caledonian Mercury (January 12, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

———

MR MOSCHELES,

PROFESSOR OF THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC,

HAS the honour to announce, that his SECOND and LAST CONCERT will take place on Friday next, 18th January 1828.

When he will perform

  1. CONCERTO (E flat) on the Grand Piano Forte, in which he will introduce a favourite Scotch Melody.
  2. (By particular desire) the new Fantasia, called “ANTICIPATIONS of SCOTLAND,” with full Accompaniments.
  3. An EXTEMPORE FANTASIA on the Piano Forte.

Further particulars will be announced in due time.

Tickets, 7s. each, or Sets of Four for a Guinea, to be had at the principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 12, 1828): 3.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

———

MR MOSCHELES,

PROFESSOR OF THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC,

HAS the honour to announce, that his Second and Last CONCERT will take place on Friday next, 18th January 1828, when he will perform—

  1. Concerto (E flat) on the Grand Pianoforte, in which he will introduce a favourite Scotch Melody.
  2. (By particular desire) the new Fantasia, called “Anticipations of Scotland,” with full Accompaniments.
  3. An extempore Fantasia on the Pianoforte.

Further particulars will be announced in due time.

Tickets, 7s. each, or sets of four for a guinea, to be had at the principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

The Scotsman (January 12, 1828): 5.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES, Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, has the honour to announce, that his SECOND and LAST CONCERT will take place on Friday next, 18th January 1828, when he will perform :—

  • CONCERTO (E flat) on the Grand Pianoforte, in which he will introduce a favourite Scotch Melody.
  • (By particular desire) the new Fantasia, called—“ANTICIPATIONS of SCOTLAND,” with full Accompaniments.
  • An EXTEMPORE FANTASIA on the Pianoforte.

Further particulars will be announced in due time.

Tickets, 7s. each, or Sets of Four for a Guinea, to be had at the principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

The Scotsman (January 16, 1828): 4.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES’ Second and Last Concert,

on Friday next, January 18, 1828.

ACT FIRST.

Overture,                 –                –                –Mozart.
Song, Mr Noakes.
Concerto, (E flat,) Grand Piano-Forte, in
    which will be introduced a favourite Scotch
    Melody, Mr Moscheles,                –Moscheles.
Duett, Miss E. Paton and Mr Noakes,
    “Borne in yon blaze,”                –Dr J. Clarke.
Song. Miss E. Paton, “Lo! Here the
    gentle lark,”                –                –                –Bishop.
Anticipations of Scotland—Fantasia, Grand
    Piano-Forte, with Full Orchestral Accomp-
    paniments, (second time of performance,)
    Mr Moscheles,             –              –                –Moscheles.

ACT SECOND.

Overture,                 –                –                –Beethoven.
Scena ed Aria, “Elena, oh tu!” Miss E.
    Paton,                –                –                –Rossini.
Recollections of Ireland—Fantasia, Grand
    Piano-Forte, with Full Orchestral Accomp-
    paniments, Mr Moscheles,               –Moscheles.
Song, Mr Noakes.
Song, Miss E. Paton, “Gloomy  Winter’s
    now awa’.”
Extemporaneous Performance on the Grand
    Piano-Forte, Mr Moscheles.
Instrumental Finale,                –                –Haydn.
Leader, Mr James Dewar.

Mr Hargitt, Jun. will preside at the Piano-Forte.

The doors to be opened at Seven, and the Concert to commence at Eight o’clock.

Tickets, Seven Shillings each, or Sets of Four for a Guinea, to be had at the Principal Music Warehouses, and at the Assembly Rooms.

Reviews

The Scotsman (January 19, 1828): 6.

MR. MOSCHELES’ CONCERT.

There are so many musical pretenders, especially in so far as the piano-forte is concerted, that it is no ordinary gratification to hear a really good player. We do not prostitute the term playing, by applying it to the noise produced by divers young ladies, who thump the black and white keys of an instrument, which is but “a chaos of confused sounds:” nor do we use the phrase in reference to the dash and execution of some professors, evincing no talent, saving what consists in nimbleness of fingers—a quality in which an automaton may dispute the precedence with a human being. We look for spirit, feeling, and energy—an emanation from the soul, not a mechanical exertion; and never have we had an opportunity of seeing this combination so transcendently effected as by Moscheles last night. Shall we confess that we never before knew the full power of the piano-forte as an instrument? We frankly do. To pretend to criticise his wonderful performances, is a pitch of vanity to which we will not aspire; we can only “applaud him to the echo, which shall applaud again.” We can just supposed, that this genius, with his piano-forte, is what Timotheus was with his lyre—the ne plus ultra of perfection. Most performers merely reach the ear, but he is not contented with this superficial conquest; he makes his way directly to the heart, using the ear, if we may so speak, merely as the medium of communication. We do not mean that he is deficient in execution or brilliancy, but that he renders these subsidiary, everything that he does seeming to originate in enthusiasm, or rather inspiration, softened and welcomed by refined taste. His own concerto in E flat is a splendid composition, in which he introduced the very common Scotch air of “Logie o’Buchan,” and attached a beauty and importance to it which elicited the warmest approbation.

Shakspeare [sic] asks “what’s in a name?” but had he lived in this present year of the nineteenth century, he never would have put such ridiculous question. We have Trees, till they almost form a grove, and Patons at least more than a pair. We were truly glad to see Miss Eliza Paton acquit herself last night in a manner that will reflect credit on her illustrious relative, and advance her own reputation. In “Elena, oh tu,” she reminded us forcibly, both in voice and style, of Miss Ayton. If she goes on as she has lately been doing, she will soon acquire a proud niche in the musical temple. Her shake is delightfully clear, and she gives her sostenuto passages with great beauty. Ridiculous hend-dresses [sic] are very fashionable, but we hope she will never again spoil her expressive countenance by wearing the one she had on yesterday evening. Mr Noakes, without possessing a very sweet or powerful voice, displays science and execution, which seemed to be highly appreciated. His “Orynthia” was encored. As this concert happened the night previous to publication, we cannot write at such length as we cool desire, nor could we remain to hear the whole; but we were glad to see the room so well filled. Among the auditory we observed De Begnis and most of the Italian Company. Mr. Dewar discharged the duties of leader in a master-style.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 21, 1828): 3.

MR. MOSCHELES’ SECOND CONCERT.

We can add little or nothing to our recorded opinion of this great musician, farther than to express our increased admiration of is splendid performances on Friday evening. It may be asked why Moscheles plays nothing but his own music.  Did this refer to any more ordinary person, we would most certainly and cordially join in the question; but as it respects Moscheles, it is deserving of consideration. Moscheles is a great and original genius, and need not, therefore, be indebted to any other composer. His compositions for public performance, while they exhibit a complete knowledge of all the resources of the instrument, and demand the utmost nicety of performance, are not a compound of passages of bravura, calculated merely to display his mechanical powers, and to leave no impression save that of wonder, but are distinguished by great richness of fancy, profound science and masterly workings of the original subject. Besides, he writes for his own peculiar style of performance, because his acquirements could not be appreciated in playing the work of other authors, these being deficient in the characteristic features which distinguish him. Thus it is, then, that be, as well as most great players, have found it necessary to write for their own performance, for then “there is an unity of sentiment in the composition and execution which produces a deeper impression on the hearer than any other person can hope to effect.” There is a lustre about Moscheles’ playing which fascinates all who listen to him, and which shone forth the other evening with uncommon brilliancy. He first played his noble Concerto in E flat, which may be considered as the most characteristic of his style. The first movement is replete with striking and splendid effects. It is a most elaborate piece of writing, and is carried on through various modulations, highly wrought and coloured, like a piece of profound and masterly reasoning, clothes in gorgeous imagery of diction. He introduced the Scotch air, “Logie o’Buchan” as an adagio with magical effect. The concluding Polacca, which is perhaps the most difficult of all of his works, is a most animated and exhilarating movement, which, towards the conclusion, is wrought up with singular grandeur and magnificence. Moscheles’ performance of this was in a corresponding degree of energy and fire, and called forth a burst of rapturous applause. He played, likewise, his “Anticipations of Scotland” with increased effect; and the oftener we hear this the more we like it. His “Recollections of Ireland’ is written in a more elaborate style than the “Anticipations,” and presents many passages of extraordinary difficulty to the performer. It is admirably calculated for exercise to the piano-forte player; and to the scientific student, it affords many striking examples of double counter-point, particularly where the several airs, previously introduced, are interwoven with each other in a peculiar and masterly style. The performance of this was remarkable for its extreme delicacy, tenderness, and brilliancy, and excited universal admiration and delight. He concluded with an extemporaneous fantasia, in which he developed the resources of his art, and introduced several favourite airs, which he managed with great skill.

Miss E. Paton gave increased proof of rising talent.—Her performance of the very difficult song, “Elena oh tu” was a fine specimen of correct and highly finished singing in the bravura style’ and the song, “They say my love is dead,” she has made her own by her peculiarly touching and simple manner of singing it. M. Noakes also gained considerably in the favour of his audience by his chaste performance of “Orynthia,” and Dr Clarke’s song. And the band did as well as could be expected from one so imperfect in its complement.

The Assembly Room was much better filled than on the first occasion, there being, perhaps, 300 present, but still there was a deficiency in the usual complement; which can be accounted for no otherwise than by the number of public musical entertainments which have taken place during the present winter—unprecedented, we believe, in our musical annals.  We cannot, therefore, quarrel with our fellow-amateurs on this apparent want of taste; but we must still remark, that few, very few, of those who might have attended, with least inconvenience to their purse and their time, were present on Friday night. They have still another opportunity of redeeming their musical character, should Mr Moscheles fulfil his intention of giving another concert on Tuesday the 29th instant. we are aware that Signor De Begnis intends to have a concert in the Assembly Rooms on the 1st of next month: but we here take the liberty of pressing on Signor De Begnis the great advantage a conjunction of interests might produce, were he to add his celebrated name to that of Moscheles. It would surely be much better for them, in the exhausted state of our finances, to have thus one good concert, rather than two bad ones.

The Edinburgh Observer (January 22, 1828): 4.

MR MOSCHELES’ CONCERT.

We adverted last week to the apathy with which concerts have been received since the introduction of the Italian Opera; and certainly the attendance on Friday night evinced no return of the eagerness with which similar entertainments were sought after during the two last winters. Scarcely twelve months since, Mr Cramer attracted full houses here; and his professional brethren seemed as anxious to aid, as the public to witness his performance. Neither by the public nor the profession has Mr Moscheles been supported in the same manner. To the friendly assistance, tendered with such alacrity to Cramer, he owes nothing and, although beyond question the first pianist of the day, he has been suffered to exhibit his powers before two as indifferent audiences, in point of numbers, as we have ever seen in the Assembly Rooms. Still it would be unfair to blame any one for this. The friendship of fiddlers, like that of ordinary mortals, must have some limit; and it would be rather too much to expect that they should come forward every occasion,—the more especially when, by. So doing, they were. Estranging the public partiality and patronage from the Society to which almost all of them belong.—Just as little can it be looked for,—even laying aside the superiority of the Opera to all other human enjoyments,—that the most indulgent papa will increase the pin money of the family to the extent of letting his six daughters, and two younger sons not yet provide for, attend a concert every evening. This very week, there is an Opera to-night, a concert to-morrow, the first of the professional series on Friday, besides the regular performances, twice a-day, of the infant Lyra, and her baby brother, 9 days old, who hums “God save the King,” with astonishing energy and expression. It is only in seasons, when temptations. Like these are present, that the heart of man becomes duly sensible of the blessings of being a Bachelor! We are included to think, however, that even with so many rival amusements, Mr Moscheles might safely venture on a third concert, as soon as the Italians quit town. On Friday evening, he performed three of his own compositions—a concerto in E flat, the “Anticipations of Scotland,” and the “Recollections of Ireland.” The first is, beyond comparison, the best, and is really an excellent piece of music; uniting at once the elaborateness and intricacy, that require and show off the highest powers of execution, with a varied and finely sustained melody throughout. The “[sic] Recollections of Ireland are an excellent arrangement and variation of three of Erin’s best melodies, “Cary [sic] Owen,” “Groves of Blarney,” and “St Patrick’s Day.” The subjects are capitally introduced and treated; and towards the conclusion there are two extremely clever passages, in which the airs are harmonized to one another, with a singular ingenuity and effect of the “Anticipations.” We can only say that we have seldom heard greater trash. The melodies of it, with the exception of “Auld Robin Gray,” are the two very worst of the many bad airs extant. If Mr Moscheles, after leaving us, shall think it worth while to write “Recollections” of our northern and, for heaven’s sake let him select some other tunes than “Kelvin Grove” and a wretched strathspey;and, above all, as he would not willingly do violence to the feelings of himself and others, let him forever forswear the barbarous accompaniment of a side-drum. The tattoo [sic] is well enough in the Castle, but most hideous in the Concert Room. These observations, of course, apply only to the piece as a composition. In what regards execution, even here, as in every thing else, he proved himself the greatest master of his instrument that has visited this country. He has all the purity of taste, and chastened expression of Cramer, and all the fire and brilliancy of Kalkbrenner, with a delicacy of touch that neither of them have attained, and an exuberance of fancy and enthusiasm that we have never seen equalled. There could not be a better method of shaming the bulk of pianists out of the absurdities of thundering and posture-making, than an attendance on Moscheles. There is no convulsive beating of the poor instrument; and still less does he seems to be aware that there is any crime in letting the hand acquire additional flexibility, by extending the motion beyond the wrist.

The orchestra was too small to require any particular notice; even if they had played any thing new, instead of Prometheus, which we soon expect to hear whistled about the streets like the Hunter’s Chorus, if it is as regularly served up as it has been for the last four years. Miss Paton sung “Elena, oh tu!” with good taste, and received hearty applause. We were determined to praise her highly, until, in the after part of the evening, we saw she had forgot the advice formerly tendered, as to interfering with the conductor’s department. If the song was not in proper time, she should, according to the invariable custom of the first singers, make the proper intimation during the symphony; any subsequent alteration savours somewhat of aff’——; but we will not write the word, for she sung Rossini’s air so well, that we forgive these little female whims.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 24, 1828): 3.

M. MOSCHELES.

This great musician has announced a morning concert for Saturday, bring the last time he can appear before an Edinburgh audience this season. We have already entered at such length into an examination of his vast abilities, both as an author and as a performer, that to enlarge upon them now would be needless repetition. But we cannot allow the present opportunity to escape without saying a few words, by way of preparing those, who mean to go to his concert, for a greater relish of what is to be performed. Many, we doubt not, are already well acquainted with his popular concerto in E major, in which is introduced the British Grenadier’s march. Of this we shall speak more particularly when we review the concert: we only now remark, that it is one of the most brilliant and sparkling of all his compositions; and is, besides its intrinsic excellence, an invaluable study for the pianoforte player. More interesting than even this, however, will be the performance of a selection from his studies published and unpublished. They display the most minute and careful attention to the purpose for which they are intended. But, while instruction is the principal object, the taste of the pupil is gratified and improved by the originality and beauty of the compositions. The merits of the published studies have been already decided on; as to those still in manuscript, we can speak from personal knowledge of them, having had the pleasure of hearing them played by the author himself. It is enough at present to say, they equal in composition those already published, as much as they exceed them in difficulty, being intended solely for those who have acquired an uncommon command of the instrument. The great novelty of the day, however, will be the concerto for voice, pianoforte, harp, and flute. This singular composition, founded on a celebrated romance by Blangini, and originally the joint production of Moscheles, Mayseder the famous violinist, and Giuliani the harpist, was firstly played at Vienna by them, and was received with rapturous applause by the most critical and fastidious audience in Europe. Each part being intended to exhibit the performer’s utmost skill, it may easily be supposed that the piece is extremely difficult. But it is exquisitely beautiful; and the combination of the human voice with the other instruments produces an effect little short of enchantment. M. Moscheles produced it last season in London, with an arrangement by himself for Mr Nicholson’s flute, instead of the original violin part, which, if possible, rendered it more captivating. The flute part is an arduous undertaking for Mr Platt; but, with some modifications of its very difficult passages, we have no doubt he will do it great justice. Miss Pauline Yaniewicz has proved herself quite able to undertake tasks of superior ability and Miss E. Paton has execution sufficient to go through her part with eclat.

With such a feast as Saturday’s Concert affords, it will be wonderful indeed if the Assembly Room is not crowded in every part.

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (February 1828): 58.

Mr. Moscheles gave three concerts. The first happened on the night of the Italian opera, which deprived him of the aid of many orchestral performers, and produced a very unsatisfactory audience, in relation to profit, but a most satisfactory one so far as the taste and intelligence of the auditors were concerned. The report made by his select company, spread his reputation with great rapidity, and his second concert exhibited the large Assembly Room very nearly filled with an audience of the first rank in Edinburgh. His performance on this occasion excited so much admiration, and became so much the subject of conversation amongst the lovers of music, that his third concert was full to overflowing. This progressive attraction of public attention was certainly in the highest degree complimentary to Moscheles’ talents; and the effect which he subsequently produced on a visit to Sir Walter Scott, when he treated extemporaneously some national music suggested to him on the occasion, so raised him in the estimation of this northern metropolis, that he is now considered as the most eminent pianist who has ever appeared amongst them. Miss Eliza Paton sang with great effect in all the three concerts, and not unfrequently reminded the audience of the Madame Pasta, whose style she makes her model. Mr. Dewar distinguished himself as a leader of much judgment and ability.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (April 30, 1828): 300.

Hr. Moscheles halte vor Kurzem eine Kunstreise nach Edinburg unternommen; er gab dort Concert: es war nur wenig besucht. Sein Spiel hatte jedoch den Anwesenden so sehr gefallen, dass der Künstler sich veranlasst sah, ein zweytes zu veranstalten, das schon weit besuchter, als das erste war. Ein drittes Concert wurde vor einer höchst zahlreichen und so entzückten Versammlung gegeben, dass ihn diese nördliche Hauptstadt für den ersten Pianisten erklärt, der je erschienen ist.

Bey dieser Gelegenheit besuchte Hr. Moscheles auch den gewesenen grossen Unbekannten in Abbotsford, und wurde von ihm, wie das zu er warten stand, sehr freundlich empfangen. Die Rede kam natürlich bald auf schottische Volkslieder und man sang dem Gaste mehre solche, ihm noch ganz unbekannte Bardengesänge vor. Sogleich setzte sich der Componist an das Instrument und phantasirte über diese Volksgesänge so, dass der vielgewandle Dichter in Bewunderung ausbrach. Kurz Beyde fanden gegenseitig, was sie geh o fit hatten und schieden gleich befriedigt von einander.

8 January 1828

Ignaz Moscheles’ First Concert

Edinburgh: Assembly Rooms

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock

Tickets: 7s., Sets of four for £1, 1s.

 

Programme

Air, ‘Lord, remember David’Mr. NonkesHandel
DuetMiss. E. Paton, Mr. Noakes 
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘Non più andrai’
and ‘Highland Laddie’
Mr. Moscheles 
  
From Il crociato in Egitto
Aria, ‘Ah, come rapida’
Miss. E. PatonMeyerbeer
From Tancredi: DuetMiss. E. Paton, [Mr. Noakes]Rossini
Harp FantasiaMr. Taylor 
Piano Fantasia, Anticipations of Scotland 
with Orchestral Accompaniments        
(composed expressly for the occasion)
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Concerto No.1 in F major:            
I) Allegro maestoso    
II) Adagio
III) Alexander Variations
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Song, ‘Echo Song’Miss E. PatonBishop
Song, ‘My Love is far from me’Miss E. PatonLindley
Principal Vocalists: Miss E. Paton; Mr. Noakes
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Moscheles, Taylor
Leader: Mr. James Dewar

———————————

Programme Notes: Moscheles replaced the third movement of the concerto with the Alexander Variations.


Charlotte: Diese Winterreise, welche zu künstlerischen Zwecken vorbereitet und unternommen war, stiess auf ein grosses Hinderniss. Eine italienische Operngesellschaft, der eine bedeutende Subscriptionsliste vorausging, war auch soeben in Edinburgh angekommen und hatte, unbekümmert um das schon angekündigte Concert von Moscheles, den selben Abend zu ihrer Vorstellung bestimmt, absorbirte also Orchester und Publicum. Zwar wurde es wahr, was die Künstler behaupteten: Man werde mit Proben des Localchors und Orchesters bis zum anberaumten Tage nicht fertig werden, Moscheles solle den übrigens günstigen Concerttag also nicht verändern. Da die Opern-Vorstellung aber erst am selben Tage abgesagt wurde, so that sie dem Concert doch Eintrag, und da das Orchester und sein tüchtiger Director noch am Concertmorgen Theaterprobe hielten, so plagte sich Moscheles mit einigen zusammenhielten Musikern, „unter denen die Bläser (grösstentheils Regimentsmusiker) im Highland-Kilt mit unbekleideten Knieen erschienen und leider ihre Sache recht schlecht machte”. [AML I, 185-186.]

Charlotte: The concert room was only two-thirds full, but Moscheles, in his fantasia, the Anticipations of Scotland, created great enthusiasm; and the newspapers, one and all, condemned the apathy shown by this poor attendance at his concert. This appeal to the good sense of the Edinburgh folk had its effect, for the two next concerts were filled to overflowings’. [RMM, 135.]

Advertisements

The Morning Post (December 12, 1827): 3.

MOSCHELES is going to Edinburgh to delight the Scottish amateurs with his extraordinary performance on the piano-forte. He is composing a Piece, to be called “Anticipations of Scotland,” which we doubt not will prove as pleasing, both to the public and himself, as his “Recollections of Ireland” have been.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 7, 1828): 3.

….This week is going to be a busy one in musical entertainments. To-morrow evening, the celebrated Moscheles is to hold his first concert in the Assembly Rooms, where we doubt not every one who pretends to musical enjoyment will be forthcoming.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 7, 1828): 3.

GRAND CONCERT.

———

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

MR MOSCHELES, Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, has the honour to announce, that he will give a

CONCERT

To-morrow, TUESDAY the 8th January 1828, when he will perform on the Piano-Forte.

1st, A CONCERTO, in which he will introduce his Variations on “The Fall of Paris.”

2d, A New FANTASIA, called “Anticipations of Scotland,” (composed expressly for the occasion.)

3d, An EXTEMPORE FANTASIA on the Piano-Forte.

Miss E. PATON will sing several of her most favourite Songs.

Particulars will be further announced.

Tickets 7s. each, or Sets of four for £1, 1s. to be had at the principal Music Shops.

Doors open at seven o’clock, and the Concert will commence at eight o’clock precisely.

The Edinburgh Observer (January 8, 1828): 1.

GRAND CONCERT.

——

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, GEORGE STREET.

——

MR MOSCHELES, Professor of the Royal Academy of Music, has the honour to announce, that he will give a

CONCERT

This Evening, TUESDAY the 8th January 1828, when he will perform on the Piano-Forte,

1st, A CONCERTO, in which he will introduce his Variations on “The Fall of Paris.”

2d, A New FANTASIA, called “Anticipations of Scotland,” (composed expressly for the occasion.)

3d, An EXTEMPORE FANTASIA on the Piano-Forte.

Mr TAYLOR will perform a FANTASIA on the Harp.

Miss E. PATON will sing several of her most favourite Songs.

And Mr NOAKES will make his First Appearance in this City.

Mr JAMES DEWAR, Lender.

Tickets 7s. each, or Sets of four for £.1, 1s. to be had at the principal Music Shops.

Doors open at seven o’clock, and the Concert will commence at eight o’clock precisely.

Reviews

The Scotsman (January 9, 1828): 6.

MOSCHELES’ FIRST CONCERT.

It cannot be necessary to tell our Edinburgh renders, that Moscheles is the greatest piano-forte player in Europe—that he is supreme in taste, and a Master in Science—and yet if all this be matter of notoriety, how is it that Moscheles performed last night to an audience which occupied only an end of our Assembly Room? We do not pretend to account for the phenomenon; but we are sure it will not occur again. In the extemporaneous performance which the concert was closed, Moscheles astonished his hearers—not by the noise or hustle of his movements, but by the fertility of his invention, the purity of his style, the force and precision of his conceptions, the brilliancy and melodiousness of his touch. Every professor—every amateur was surprised and delighted. We need not, therefore, talk of the extend of our own gratification; though, had it been less, we probably should have said a little more. We must, add however, that Miss E. Paton seems improved, in every respect, by her recent excursion to the south.

Caledonian Mercury (January 10, 1828): 3.

MR. MOSCHELES’ CONCERT.

Mr Moschele’s fame as a piano forte player and composer is so well known, that we were not a little surprised to find his concert very thinly attended on Tuesday evening last. We are quite at a loss to account for the paucity of auditors. Madame Pasta gave some eight or nine concerts, and all were successful; the Italian opera has been drawing full houses, some of them overflowing, for nearly a month; Ducrow’s performances are so numerously attended that numbers are disappointed in gaining admittance, every night, and yet Moscheles’ failed in attracting even a moderate audience. It cannot be because these amusements have preceded Mr Moscheles; they are still hoping on with success, and upon Tuesday last there was no opera. For our own part, after hearing his brilliant performances, we hesitate not to say we prefer him, upon the whole, to any piano forte player with those performances we are acquainted. The concert [*] pieces judiciously selected, and afforded scope for the display of varied talent which was exhibited by the different performers with great effect; but the chief attraction of the evening was Mr Moscheles, whose unrivalled powers never fail to astonish and delight. On his entrance he was greeted with loud and enthusiastic applause, which continued for a considerable time. His first performance was the Concerto, in which he introduced his highly celebrated and favourite variations on the “Fall of Paris,” and a more masterly and highly finished performance was never before listened to. His next performance, “Anticipations of Scotland,” surpasses any thing of the kind we ever heard. The introduction is uncommonly beautiful, and the Scotch airs, “Kelvin Grove.” &c. with the variations, are full of originality and beauty. The whole piece was given with the most consummate taste and expression; and we have no doubt it will become standard article of concert music. The “Extemporaneous Performance” was replete with fancy and imagination, and had all the effect of a studied production of no ordinary description. The concert had the assistance of Miss. E. Paton, who sung several songs and duets. Lindley’s “My Love is far from me,” was not very effective, and the same may be said of her “Echo Song,” while the echo is made with the flute instead of her own voice—a necessity which mars the principal effect of this beautiful but difficult song. She however sung with all her usual finish and execution, the scena ed aria ‘Ah come rapida,” from Meyerbeer, and in a Duet from “Il Tancredi.” Mr Nonkes made a favourable appearance as a singer. He sung very sweetly, Handel’s “Lord Remember David,” and also in a duet with Miss E. Paton. Mr Taylor gave a fantasia on the harp, which was much admired; and the whole was received with frequent marks of approbation.

Edinburgh Evening Courant (January 10, 1828): 2.

MR. MOSCHELES’ CONCERT.

The postponement of the production of “La Gazza Laddra,” at the Theatre, came too late to be of any service to this celebrated performer, who gave his first Concert in the Assembly Rooms, on Tuesday evening. We know it was not decided till after the Opera on Monday, that “La Gazza Laddra” should be deferred till to-day. We are grateful, very grateful, for the entertainment which Signor de Begnis and his corps have afforded us since they came here; and we only regret that they leave us so soon; but there are just some little things which our anxiety to do justice and to find justice done to every candidate for public favour in this city, have compelled us to question; and which we hope will not again occur.

From what we have said, our readers will easily infer, that in point of attendance, Moscheles’ Concert was all but a failure, there bring no more than about a hundred, and several of these not paying! We looked in vain for any of the fashionables, who were wont to grace the Assembly Rooms on all such occasions; but let them not allow his next Concert (which, we believe, is to take place on Friday week) to stamp their character of indifference to the most accomplished performer on the piano-forte who has ever honoured Edinburgh with a visit. They have no idea of his powers by all that we can say of him. He must be heard to be appreciated. If Cramer was upon us by his matchless expression, Moscheles carries us by storm, as well by splendour and power of his execution, as by the exquisite delicacy of his expression. His touch is light, elegant, and brilliant. He laughs at difficulties, dashing them off with inconceivable case, and at the same time throwing into them all possible effect. It is not the conquering of difficulties—these are of secondary consequence. It is the style of performing them which marks the great player. And how superb is his style! His concerto in F major is one of his earliest and perhaps, comparatively speaking, his least difficult compositions [sic]. But it abounds in fine broad masses of harmony for the orchestra, and passages of enchanting grace and beauty for the piano forte. It is full of fancy and science, and as a composition bears a striking similarity to Mozart’s, which is surely saying as much as possible. Instead of the adagio and rondo belonging to the concerto, he finished it with his celebrated “Fall of Paris,” a composition in every way worthy of its author. The excessive difficulty of this piece has not prevented it from being murdered by the fingers of boarding-school misses. We have heard it played in this way more than once, and we have listened to its performance in public by very clever players, but certainly we never till the other evening became thoroughly acquainted with the beauty of the composition, and the magic of its effect. There was perhaps none among all his numerous operas more admirably adapted for the display of all his powers. We do not think his “Anticipations of Scotland” has been produced in a moment of inspiration; but we feel highly honoured by his kind intentions.—There are, however, some fine and striking passages here and there. His florid harmony on the recurrence of “Kelvin Grove,” and the occasional introduction of fragments of several airs into his modulations, are exceedingly happy and effective; and the manner in which the reel is arranged, and worked up, is masterly and exhilarating. His greatest triumph, on Tuesday evening, was undoubtedly his extemporaneous Fantasia. It was exactly what this species of composition should be, namely—wild, fanciful, scientific, and sprinkled with traits of melody, wrought into a thousand playful forms. In listening to this performance, we felt an enthusiasm of delight, which is quite indescribable; and at its conclusion we fell into a sort of delirium, out of which we did not emerge till we heard the thunders of ecstatic applause which broke forth. How admirably did he introduce “Non pui andrai,” and how endless the variety of forms into which he worked it! And then, as if to shew the inexhaustible resources of his art, with what masterly contrivance did he interweave it with the Highland Laddie into a thousand hues, “the last still loveliest!”

We have left ourselves little room to say much respecting the other performers. Mr. Nonkes, from Durham Cathedral, made his first appearance in “Lord remember David,” which he sung with much taste and feeling. He has a fine voice, and a good shake. We revise him not to attempt Italian music till he acquires a better pronunciation of the language. Miss E. Paton is considerably improved, and promised to establish herself in a high station as a singer. She sung some of her favourite songs with more feeling and variety of expression than heretofore, and met with merited approbation. She likewise attempted “O come rapida,” in which Pasta shone forth with such splendour. Even at this distance of time the recollections of it caused a total eclipse of Miss Paton’s attempt, which we cannot help saying, was more to be admired for its boldness than for its success.

The Edinburgh Observer (January 11, 1828): 4.

MOSCHELES’ FIRST CONCERT.

——

It is with regret we mention that this distinguished performer made his first appearance in Edinburgh, in a room almost empty. We know not whether this is to be ascribed to the unusual number of musical treats that now distract the attention of the public, or to people of taste being more engaged, at this season of the year, in gastronomic amusements; but we trust, in charity, that there is no want of liberality, or of a proper appreciation of those talents which have gained Mr. Moschelles the reputation of being the first pianist in Europe. Uniting, as a contemporary critic justly remarks, all the delicacy, grateful finish, and purity of Cramer, with the fire and brilliancy of Kalkbrenner—he surpasses both, and afford the highest gratification, not only to the scientific connoisseur, but to the very one in the least alive to the beauties of music. He is not a clap-trap juggler who caters to the bad taste of a genteel mob, but a man of genius, —an intellectual performer—and an enthusiast in that divine art to which he is so great to an ornament. We hope his next concert will evince that the public of Edinburgh know how to appreciate his splendid talents; and we would recommend every young lady who has any devotion or love for the art, to make one of his audience;—an hour in the concert-room will do her more essential service than six months’ ordinary drilling.—She may no, indeed, increase the rapidity of her execution, but what is much better, she may catch some of his fire and enthusiasm, cultivate her taste, and afterwards retain in her mind’s eye, a standard of excellence, which, though she may never attain it, will at least excite her imitation.

Mr. Moschelles’ first performance was his celebrated and well known concerto, in which is introduced his brilliant variations on the common place air of the “Fall of Paris.” The theme was before thread-bare and uninteresting, but he has treated it with the hand of a master, and the performance was splendid. His “Anticipations of Scotland,” which followed, is a composition full of beauties, and must soon be in the hands of every good piano-forte player. It was delightful to see a foreigner enter into the spirit and pathos of the Scotch airs, and treat them with so much taste and fancy. We can never forget “Auld Robin Grey,” which would have melted any one into tears, had it been heard on “hill side or in farmers’ ha,” instead of a Concert Room, where such music cannot be fully felt and appreciated. Mr. Moschelles’ extemporaneous performance, with which he concluded, was also of the highest order. It was rich in beautiful ideas, and variety of expression; and afforded a high intellectual treat to all who heard it.

We have to congratulate Miss E. Paton on her first appearance this winter. During the summer she was wisely been cultivating her talents, and has made very considerable progress since we last heard her. It evinced some boldness to sing Meyerbeer’s difficult air, “Oh come rapida,” so soon after Madame Pasta, but the result more than justified the attempt. She also sung Bishop’s “Echo Song,” and “My Love is far from me,” in a very tasteful style.

A Mr NOAKES, who has a fine voice, and sings with much feeling and judgment, made his debut at his concert, his “Lord Remember David,” was sung with much taste and expression. The band, though small, was ably led Mr Dewar.

The Courier (January 16, 1828): 3.

MOSCHELLES’ FIRST CONCERT.—It is with regret we mention that this distinguished performer made his first appearance in Edinburgh, in a room almost empty. We know not whether this is to be ascribed to the unusual number of musical treats that now distract the attention of the public or to people of taste being more engaged, at this season of the year, in gastronomic amusements; but we trust, in charity, that there is no want of liberality, or of a proper appreciation of those talents which have gained Mr. Moschelles the reputation of being the first pianist in Europe. Uniting, as a contemporary critic justly remarks, all the delicacy, grateful finish, and purity of Cramer, with the fire and brilliancy of Kalkbrenner—he surpasses both, and afford the highest gratification, not only to the scientific connoisseur, but to the very one in the least alive to the beauties of music. He is not a clap-trap juggler who caters to the bad taste of a genteel mob; but a man of genius, an intellectual performer, and an enthusiast in that divine art to which he is so great to an ornament. We hope his next concert will evince that the public of Edinburgh know how to appreciate his splendid talents; and we would recommend every young lady who has any devotion or love for the art, to make one of his audience; —an hour in the concert-room will do her more essential service than six months’ ordinary drilling. She may not, indeed, increase the rapidity of her execution, but what is much better, she may catch some of his fire and enthusiasm, cultivate her taste, and afterwards retain in her mind’s eye, a standard of excellence, which, though she may never attain it, will at least excite her imitation. Mr. Moschelles’ first performance was his celebrated and well known concerto, in which is introduced his brilliant variations on the common place air of the “Fall of Paris.” The theme was before threadbare and uninteresting, but he has treated it with the hand of master, and the performance was splendid. His “Anticipations of Scotland,” which followed, is a composition full of beauties, and must soon be in the hands of every good piano-forte player. It was delightful to see a foreigner enter into the spirit and pathos of the Scotch airs, and treat them with so much taste and fancy. We can never forget “Auld Robin Grey,” which would have melted any one into tears, had it been heard on “hill side or in farmers’ ha,” instead of a Concert Room, where much music cannot be fully felt and appreciated. Mr. Moschelles’ extemporaneous performance, with which he concluded, was also of the highest order. It was rich in beautiful ideas, and variety of expression; and afforded a high intellectual treat to all who heard it.—Edinburgh Observer, of Friday, Jan. 11.

The Standard (January 17, 1828): 1.

MOSCHELLES’ FIRST CONCERT.—It is with regret we mention that this distinguished performer made his first appearance in Edinburgh, in a room almost empty. We know not whether this is to be ascribed to the unusual number of musical treats that now distract the attention of the public or to people of taste being more engaged, at this season of the year, in gastronomic amusements; but we trust, in charity, that there is no want of liberality, or of a proper appreciation of those talents which have gained Mr. Moschelles the reputation of being the first pianist in Europe. Uniting, as a contemporary critic justly remarks, all the delicacy, grateful finish, and purity of Cramer, with the fire and brilliancy of Kalkbrenner—he surpasses both, and afford the highest gratification, not only to the scientific connoisseur, but to the very one in the least alive to the beauties of music. He is not a clap-trap juggler who caters to the bad taste of a genteel mob; but a man of genius, an intellectual performer, and an enthusiast in that divine art to which he is so great to an ornament. We hope his next concert will evince that the public of Edinburgh know how to appreciate his splendid talents; and we would recommend every young lady who has any devotion or love for the art, to make one of his audience; —an hour in the concert-room will do her more essential service than six months’ ordinary drilling. She may not, indeed, increase the rapidity of her execution, but what is much better, she may catch some of his fire and enthusiasm, cultivate her taste, and afterwards retain in her mind’s eye, a standard of excellence, which, though she may never attain it, will at least excite her imitation. Mr. Moschelles’ first performance was his celebrated and well known concerto, in which is introduced his brilliant variations on the common place air of the “Fall of Paris.” The theme was before threadbare and uninteresting, but he has treated it with the hand of master, and the performance was splendid. His “Anticipations of Scotland,” which followed, is a composition full of beauties, and must soon be in the hands of every good piano-forte player. It was delightful to see a foreigner enter into the spirit and pathos of the Scotch airs, and treat them with so much taste and fancy. We can never forget “Auld Robin Grey,” which would have melted any one into tears, had it been heard on “hill side or in farmers’ ha,” instead of a Concert Room, where much music cannot be fully felt and appreciated. Mr. Moschelles’ extemporaneous performance, with which he concluded, was also of the highest order. It was rich in beautiful ideas, and variety of expression; and afforded a high intellectual treat to all who heard it.—Edinburgh Observer, of Friday, Jan. 11.

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (1828): 35.

8th. Moscheles gave a concert at the Assembly Rooms this evening, but the company scarcely filled one-fourth of the seats. He played many things, and amongst these, “Anticipations of Scotland,” a new composition, in which he, perhaps, introduced the old song, “I dreamt a golden dream.” He will, doubtless, publish this, and most probably write another under the title of Le Retour de l’Ecosse, wherein he may give us the beautiful Scotish [sic] air, “There’s nae luck,” followed by another almost as good, “Todlen hame.” But, seriously, I did expect that an artist of such very rare talents, a man so justly celebrated all over Europe, would have met with a kindlier welcome. The plague of fashion has, I fear, spread even to the intellectual city, the modern Athens.

The Harmonicon, vol. VI (February 1828): 58.

Mr. Moscheles gave three concerts. The first happened on the night of the Italian opera, which deprived him of the aid of many orchestral performers, and produced a very unsatisfactory audience, in relation to profit, but a most satisfactory one so far as the taste and intelligence of the auditors were concerned. The report made by his select company, spread his reputation with great rapidity, and his second concert exhibited the large Assembly Room very nearly filled with an audience of the first rank in Edinburgh. His performance on this occasion excited so much admiration, and became so much the subject of conversation amongst the lovers of music, that his third concert was full to overflowing. This progressive attraction of public attention was certainly in the highest degree complimentary to Moscheles’ talents; and the effect which he subsequently produced on a visit to Sir Walter Scott, when he treated extemporaneously some national music suggested to him on the occasion, so raised him in the estimation of this northern metropolis, that he is now considered as the most eminent pianist who has ever appeared amongst them. Miss Eliza Paton sang with great effect in all the three concerts, and not unfrequently reminded the audience of the Madame Pasta, whose style she makes her model. Mr. Dewar distinguished himself as a leader of much judgment and ability.

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (April 30, 1828): 300.

Moscheles und Walter Scott.

Hr. Moscheles halte vor Kurzem eine Kunstreise nach Edinburg unternommen; er gab dort Concert: es war nur wenig besucht. Sein Spiel hatte jedoch den Anwesenden so sehr gefallen, dass der Künstler sich veranlasst sah, ein zweytes zu veranstalten, das schon weit besuchter, als das erste war.