21 May 1825

Anniversary Dinner of the Royal Society of Musicians

London: New Argyll Rooms

Dinner: Six o’Clock Tickets: 1 Guinea (wine included

 

Programme

Hymn, ‘Non nobis Domine’Professors 
National Anthem (3rd stanza as a duet)Masters Parry, Smith and the Band 
Glee, ‘The Duke of York and the Army’    
Glee, ‘The Duke of Clarence and the Navy’  
Glee, ‘Hail, happy Albion’Piano: Mr. GreatorexCallcott
[Free Piano Fantasia], incl. March from
Die Zauberflöte with Variations  
Mr. Moscheles 
Glee for Five Voices and Chorus  
‘Oh, the tweet Contentment’
 Horsley
Trio for two Guitars and a PhysharmonicaGuitars: Mr. Schultz and his younger son;
Physharmonica: Mr. Schultz’s elder son
 
Glee, ‘The Curfew’Masters Bayley, Wesley; Piano: Mr. LeeteAttwood
‘Home, sweet home’ with Flute VariationsFlute: Mr. Nicholson; Piano: Mr. Lord jun.Bishop
Irish Melody, ‘Gramachree’Clarinet: Mr. Willman; Flute: Mr. Nicholson 
RondoClarinet: Mr. Willman; Flute: Mr. Nicholson 
From Orlando: Air, ‘Lascia Amor e siegui Marte’  Mr. PhillipsHandel
Irish air, ‘Kathleen o’Moore’Master Smith   
Glee, ‘When the Wind blows’Mr. VaughanBishop
‘Mr. and Mrs. Provost’Mr. Charles Taylor 
From Der Freischütz: ‘Huntsmen’s Chorus’   Weber arranged by Hawes
*SongMr. Charles Taylor 
*SongMr. Charles Taylor 
Principal Vocalists: Masters Bayley, Parry, Smith, Wesley, Messrs. C. Taylor, Phillips, Vaughan      
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Cramer, Fleischer, Greatorex, Harper, Leete, Mackintosh, Monzani, Marliotti, Moscheles, Nicholson, Petrides, Powell, Sharp, Schultz and two sons, Swillman, Tully Wallis, Willman

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Programme Notes: The piano brand was Broadwood.

Encore: Irish Melody, ‘Gramachree’—Clarinet: Mr. Willman; Flute: Mr. Nicholson

Advertisements

The Morning Post (May 16, 1825):

ROYAL SOCIETY of MUSICIANS.—By Command of his Most Excellent Majesty the King, will be Performed in the King’s Concert Rooms, Hanover-square, on WEDNESDAY, June the 8th, for the BENEFIT of that SOCIETY, the SACRED ORATORIO of the MESSIAH. The Vocal Parts by the principal Performers of the Ancient Concert. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer.—Conductor, Mr. Greatorex. The Rehearsal will take place on Monday, June 6, at Twelve o’Clock; the doors to be opened at Eleven. The Performance, at half-past Seven o’Clock: and the doors will be opened at half-past six. Tickets for the Rehearsal and Performance, to admit one person to each, to be had at Birchall’s Music Shop, No. 133, New Bond-street, price One Guinea. Admittance to the Rehearsal Half a Guinea.

The Nobility and Gentry are respectfully informed, that the ANNIVERSARY DINNER of this Society will take place on a Grand Scale on WHITSUN EVE, May 21, at the ARGYLL ROOMS, when Compositions of the most celebrated Authors, both Vocals and Instrumental, will be performed, particulars of which will be printed, and distributed in the Rooms.

The Right Hon. the Earl FORTESCUE, in the Chair.

Dinner at six o’clock precisely.—Tickets (which are limited) One Guinea each, to be had at Birchall’s, Bond-street; Harmonic Institution, Argyll Rooms; and Bett’s Royal Exchange. The Dinner furnished by Mr. Wand, of Bond-street, and the Wines by Mr. Kay, of the Albion. No collection after dinner.

Ibid., 3.

FASHIONABLE ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE WEEK.

….

SATURDAY.

….

Grand Festival of the Royal Society of Musicians, at the Argyll Rooms.

The Courier (May 17, 1825): 3.

GRAND MUSICAL FESTIVAL.—The Committee of Management is indefatigable in its exertions, to ensure the lovers of harmony a most exquisite treat, at the Anniversary Dinner of the Royal Society of Musicians, which takes places on Saturday next, at the Argyll Rooms. Moscheles will be there, and so will Nicholson, also Mr. Schutz and his Songs, who have just arrived from Germany, and whose extraordinary performance on two Guitars, and a new instrument called Physharmonica, has received the highest approbation of the King. Some of the finest Vocal and Instrumental Compositions will be executed by a very numerous assemblage of eminent Professors, who feel it an incumbent duty, to promote the interest of this most excellent Institution.

The Morning Post (May 17, 1825): 3.

MUSICALS.— The Anniversary Festival of the Royal Society of Musicians, which takes place on Saturday next, at the Argyll Rooms, is expected to be the greatest treat of the kind this season. Earl FORTESCUE (as one of the Directors of the King’s Concerts) presides at the Dinner. The celebrated MOSCHELES will perform on the Pianoforte; our own native warbler, NICHOLSON, on the Flute; and Mr. SCHUTZ with his two sons (who have just arrived from Germany) will perform on Guitars, and a newly invented instrument, called the Physharmonica; exclusively of some of the finest Glees, by a most powerful vocal corps, and several excellent compositions by a very superior band of wind instruments.

The Morning Post (May 18, 1825): 3.

Mr. SCHULTZ and his two Sons were lately introduced to the King by Mr. ATTWOOD, the musical professor, in consequence of Mr. S. having invented a new instrument, called the Physharmonicon, the properties of which are to produce tones similar to those of the softest stops of an organ. Mr. S. and his Sons performed six pieces before his MAJESTY, one of them was repeated. They are to perform at the Festival of the Royal Society of Musicians.

The Courier (May 19, 1825): 1.

ROYAL SOCIETY of MUSICIANS.—By Command of his Most Excellent Majesty the KING, will be performed in the King’s Concert Rooms, Hanover-square, on Wednesday, the 8th of June next, for the BENEFIT of that SOCIETY, the SACRED ORATORIO of the MESSIAH.

The Vocal Parts by the principal Performers of the Ancient Concert.—Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer.—Conductor, Mr. Greatorex. The Rehearsal will take place on Monday, the 6th of June, at Twelve o’Clock; the Doors to be opened at Eleven. The Performance, at Half-past Seven o’Clock: and the Doors will be opened at Half-past Six.

Tickets for the Rehearsal and Performance, to admit One Person to each, to be had at Birchall’s Music Shop, 133, New Bond-street, price One Guinea. Admittance to the Rehearsal Half a Guinea.

The Nobility and Gentry are respectfully informed, that the ANNIVERSARY DINNER of this SOCIETY will take place on a Grand Scale on Whitsun Eve, May the 21st, at the Argyll Rooms, when Compositions of the most celebrated Authors, both Vocals and Instrumental, will be performed, particulars of which will be printed, and distributed in the Rooms.

The Right Hon. the Earl FORTESCUE, in the Chair.

Dinner at Six o’Clock precisely.—Tickets (which are limited.) One Guinea each, to be had at Birchall’s, Bond-street; and Bett’s Royal Exchange. The Dinner furnished by Mr. Wand, of Bond-street, and the Wines by Mr. Kay, of the Albion. No Collection after Dinner.

The Morning Post (May 19, 1825): 1.

[Same as issued in The Morning Post on May 16]

The Morning Post (May 21, 1825): 1.

ROYAL SOCIETY of MUSICIANS.—The Committee of Management respectfully inform the Public, that NO MORE TICKETS can be issued for the ANNIVERSARY FESTIVAL, which takes place THIS DAY, at the Argyll Rooms.

May 21, 1825.                                                                                                  M. SIMCOCK, Secretary.

Reviews

The Courier (May 23, 1825): 3.

The Anniversary Festival of the Royal Society of Musicians was held on Saturday last, at the Argyll Rooms.

The Morning Post (May 23, 1825): 3.

ROYAL SOCIETY OF MUSICIANS.

The Anniversary Festival of this excellent Institution was held on Saturday last, at the Argyll Rooms.

So much interest had been created by the announcement of this meeting, that the Committee of Management were obliged to advertise on Friday and Saturday that no more tickets would be issued. This regulation was highly necessary, to ensure comfort to those who attended the dinner, which was a most excellent one, provided by WAUD, of Bond-street, who served it at the moment appointed, viz. six o’clock; when Earl FORTESCUE took the Chair, surrounded by as many Gentlemen as the spacious Concert Room could accommodate, and honoured with a brilliant assemblage of Beauty, “England’s fairest flowers,” who occupied the boxes.

When the cloth was removed “Non nobis Domine” was sung in a truly sublime manner, by a vast number of Professors of the first celebrity.

The first toast was “The King, Patron of the Society.”—(Loud applause.)—Our National Anthem followed, accompanied by a most charming Band, consisting of Messrs. CRAMER, WILLMAN, POWELL, FLEISCHER, MONZANI, VOGT, SHARP, MACKINTOSH, TULLY, PETRIDES, HARPER, WALLIS, MARLIOTTI, &c. Masters SMITHS and PARRY sung the third stanza as a duet, which had a very pleasing effect.

“The Duke of York and the Army.”—Were any thing wanting to prove that the conduct of the Commander in Chief, on a late occasion, has endeared him more than ever to the public at large, the long continued plaudits on this occasion might be instanced. “The Duke of Clarence and the Navy.” Glee.  “Hail, happy Albion,” finely performed, Mr. GREATOREX presiding at the Pianoforte.

Mr. HORSLEY rose to propose the health of the Noble President, and after giving a brief statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Society, and creating much laughter by many witty remarks on the different modes resorted to, to procure subscribers, &c. &c., he drew a most animated and feeling picture of the aged musician, who looked to this Society for support, of the distressed widow, who also was cherished by it, and lastly, the poor dear orphan, who was thrown on the world, and who might wander from the paths of virtue and come to a disgraceful end, were it not for protection of the Society. There are on the books at this time, eleven aged musicians, forty widows, and thirty orphans! all of whom derive a comfortable maintenance from the bounty of the Society. Mr. HORSLEY concluded one of the best speeches we ever heard at a public dinner, by giving “Earl Fortescue, with three times three.”—His LORDSHIP returned thanks, assuring the company, that he would promote the interest of the Institution as far as in him laid; and, as a proof of his anxiety to please them, he would request Mr. MOSCHELES to favour them with a solo on the Pianoforte.— (Thunders of applause.) Mr. MOSCHELES sat down to a most beautiful instrument of BROADWOOD’s, and, “with a master’s hand,” preluded in a most extraordinary manner, then played MOZART’s exquisite March in the Zauberflöte (we believe) as a Thema, on which he executed such brilliant variations, as baffle all description ; suffice it to say, that it was one of the finest efforts ever heard, and the exertions and wonderful talents of the performer, were rewarded by acclamations, as he walked from the instrument to his seat.

Dr. SMITHS rose to propose the health of the Honorary Vice-Presidents; in doing which he observed, that speeches at well as sermons might be made too long; he would therefore only beg to thank the Royal and Noble Vice-Presidents for their patronage, and to assure them, that it would be ever gratefully acknowledged by the Society.

Horsley’s cheerful [sic] glee for five voices and chorus, of “Oh, the tweet Contentment,” finely performed.

The PRESIDENT announced, that Mr. SCHULZ and his sons would favour the company with their performance on two guitars, and a newly-invented instrument called the physharmonica, which is a small box of about eighteen inches long and six wide, containing pieces of metal of different sizes, and a cylinder, which is turned by a pedal, touched by the foot. It is played like the pianoforte, chiefly with one hand; its tones are exquisitely soft, resembling the musical glasses. Of the performance we must speak in the highest terms. The father and younger son play the guitars extremely well, particularly the boy, who appears no more than nine years old, and the elder (about eleven) touches the physharmonica with uncommon taste and feeling. It is altogether a very delightful treat, and from the applause the strangers received on this occasion, we augur that their visit to England will not be regretted: they are natives of Vienna.  

“The Physicians and Surgeons.” —Here a laughable coincidence appeared in the printed programme— of course accidentally—for the toast was followed by ATTWOOD’S beautiful glee of “The Curfew,” extremely well sung by Master’s WESLEY and BAYLEY, and Mr. LEETE; the author presiding at the pianoforte.

The NOBLE PRESIDENT in a neat speech proposed the health of the Ladies, and thanks to them for the honour of their company.

Mr. NICHOLSON performed “Home, sweet home.” with variations on the flute, accompanied on the pianoforte by Mr. Lord, jun. To say that NICHOLSON performed, is a guarantee sufficient that it was a delightful treat, and duly appreciated by the company. Mr. NICHOLSON and Mr. WILLMAN performed in the course of the evening “Gramachree,” on the flute and clarionet, in the most delicate and mellifluous manner; they were loudly encored, but they played a smart rondo in the most finished style of excellence.

Mr. PHILLIPS sung HANDEL’S fine song from Orlando, of “Lascia Amor,” when he had an opportunity of displaying his rich and mellow voice. We predict that this young man will become a second BARTLEMAN. Master SMITH sung a pretty Irish air, “Kathleen ta Moor,” most delightfully, and repeated it, at the universal call of the room. BISHOP’S charming round of “When the Wind blows” was sung by Mr. VAUGHAN and all the vocal corps, accompanied by a band, in a manner that drew down the highest marks of approbation. CHARLES TAYLOR gave “Mr. and Mrs. Provost” with infinite comic effect; he also sung two more songs in the course of the evening. The entertainment closed with the huntsman’s chorus from Freischulz, as arranged by HAWES, which had an excellent effect.

In the course of the evening, the President had the pleasing task of reading over several lists of donations and subscriptions; among the former was a sum of fifty pounds from Messrs. Broadwoods, being their second donation.

Thus concluded the greatest entertainment of the kind ever offered to the public. The wines furnished by Mr. KAY, of the Albion, were excellent, and the festival altogether was exceedingly well managed by a Committee consisting of the following eminent Professors :—

Attwood, jun., A. Betts, Burrowes, J. Calkin, J. B. Cramer, F. Cramer, Dance, Griffin, Hawes, Horsley, Knvvett, W. Knyvett, Lord, Lord, jun., Mackintosh, Neate, Nield, Parry, Potter, Rovedino, M. Sharp, Sherrington, Shield, Sale, Dr. Smith.

11 July 1823

Madame Borgondio’s Concert

London: Mr. Strochling’s Residence, 28 Leicester Square

Tickets: 10s. 6d.

 

Programme

Principal Vocalists:  Signora Camporese, Signora de Begnis, a Lady Amateur; Signors Begrez, Curioni, de Begnis, Garcia, Placci, Torri      
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Dragonetti, Holst, Moscheles, Signors Pistrucci, Puzzi

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Advertisements

The Morning Chronicle (July 9, 1823): 1.

MADAME BORGONDIO’S CONCERT.—Madame BORGONDIO has the honour to announce to the Nobility and Gentry, and the Public, that her CONCERT will take place on Friday next, at the house of Mr. Strochling, No. 28, Leicester-square, when the following eminent Performers have kindly promised their assistance.—Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Signors Garcia, Torri, De Begnis, Curioni, Begrez, Placci, and a Lady Amateur; together with the united talents of Messieurs Dragonetti, Puzzi, Moscheles, Holst, and Pistrucci, improvisatore.—Tickets, Half a Guinea each, to be had of Madame Borgondio, No.39, Brewer-street, Golden-square.

The Morning Post (July 9, 1823): 1.

MADAME BORGONDIO’S CONCERT.—Madame BORGONDIO has the honour to announce to the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, that her CONCERT will take place on FRIDAY. July 11, at the House of Mr. Strochling, 28, Leicester square, when the following eminent Performers, have kindly promised their assistance:—Madame Camporese, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Signors Garcia, Torri, De Begnis, Curioni, Begrez, Placci, and a Lady (amateur), together with the united talents of Messrs. Dragonetti, Puzzi, Moscheles, Holst, and Pistrucci, improvisatore.—Tickets Half-a-Guinea each, to be had of Madame Borgondio, 39, Brewer-street, Golden-square.

7 July 1823

Madame Maria Caradori Allan’s Morning Concert

London: Mrs. West’s Residence, 37 Bryastone Square

Time: Evening, Half Past Eight o’Clock

 

Programme

Part I  
Symphony Mozart
From Il matrimonio segreto
Duet, ‘Se fiato in corpo avete’  
Signors de Begnis, PlacciCimarosa  
Variations, ‘Vieni amore’Mme Caradori 
Terzetto, ‘Con rispetto’Signors Curioni, de Begnis, Placci  Mosca
Song, ‘Sweet home’Miss StephensBishop
From Aureliano in Palmira
Duet, ‘Se tu m’ami, o mia regina’  
Signora Camporese, Signora de BegnisRossini  
Violin SoloMr. Mori 
Piano FantasiaMr. MoschelesMoscheles
From Bianca e Falliero: Quartet, ‘Cielo, il mio labbro ispira’  Mme Camporese, Signora Caradori, Signors Curioni, PlacciRossini
Part II  
Violoncello DuetMessrs. Lindley, Lindley jun. 
AriaSignor Garcia 
From La donna del lago: Quartet         Mme Camporese, Signora Caradori, Signors Curioni, PlacciRossini
Song, ‘Why with Sighs’Mme CaradoriRossini
Flute FantasiaMr. NicholsonNicholson
French Romance, ‘La Fileuse’Mme Caradori 
From Mosè in Egitto: ‘Preghiera del Mose’ Rossini
Principal Vocalists:   Miss Stephens, Mme Caradori, Signora Camporese, Signora de Begnis; Signors Curioni, de Begnis, Garcia, Placci      
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Lindley, Lindley jun., Mori, Moscheles, Nicholson
   Leader: Mr. Nicolas Mori; Conductor: Signor Coccia

———————————

Encores: Song, ‘Sweet home’—Miss Stephens—Bishop

French Romance, ‘La Fileuse’—Mme Caradori

Advertisements

The Morning Chronicle (July 7, 1823): 1.

MADEMOISELLE CARADORI has the honour to announce to the Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to the Opera, and the Public, that her CONCERT will take at the House of Mrs. WEST, No. 37, BRYANSTONE-SQUARE, THIS EVENING.—PROGRAMME.—Part 1.—1. Symphonia Mozart; 2. Duet, Signor De Begnis and Signor Placci, “Se fiatto in corpo avete,” Cimarosa; 3. Variations, Mad. Caradori, “Vieni amore,” Caradori; 4. Terzett, Signori Curioni, Placci, and De Begnis, “Con rispetto,” Mosca; 5. Song, Miss Stephens, “Sweet Home,” Bishop; 6. Duet, Madame Camporese and Mad. Ronzi de Begnis, “Se tu m’ami o mia Regina,” Rossini; 7. Solo, Mr. Mori; 8. Fantasia, Piano, Mr. Moscheles. Moscheles; 9. Quartett, Madame Camporese, Mademoiselle Caradori, Signori Curioni, and Placci, “Cielo il mio labro,” Rossini.—Part 2. 1. Duet, Violoncello, Messrs. Lindley, Lindley; 2. Aria, Signor Garcia; 3. Quartett, Donna del Lago, Madame Camporese, Mademoiselle Caradori, Signor Placci, and Mr. Begrez. Rossini; 4. English Song, Mademoiselle Caradori, “Why with Sighs” 5. Fantasia, Flute, Mr. Nicholson, Nicholson; 6. French Romance, Mademoiselle Caradori, “La Fileuse,” Caradori; 7. Preghiera del Mose, Madame Camporese, Mademoiselle Caradori, Signor Placci, Signor Garcia, and Mr. Begrez, Rossini. Performance to begin at half-past eight precisely. Leader, Mr. Mori; Conductor, Signor Coccia. Applications for tickets to be made to Mr. Ebers, 27, Old Bond-street, and all the principal music sellers.

The Morning Post (July 7, 1823): 2.

MADLLE. CARADORI has the honour to announce to the Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to the Opera, and the Public, that her CONCERT will take at the HOUSE of Mrs. WEST, No. 37, Bryanstone-square, THIS EVENING, July 7.—PROGRAMME.—Part I.—1. Symphonia Mozart.—2. Duet, Signor De Begnis and Signor Placci, “Se fiatto in corpo avete,” Cimarosa.—3. Variations, Mademoiselle Caradori, “Vieni amore,” Caradori.-4. Terzett, Signori Curioni, Placci, and de Begnis, “Con rospetti,” Mosca. 5. Song, Miss Stephens, “Sweet Home,” Bishop.—6. Duet, Madame Camporese and Madame Ronzi De Begnis, “Se tu m’ami o mia Regina,” Rossini.—7. Solo, Mr. Mori.—8. Fantasia, Piano, Mr. Moscheles, Moscheles.—9. Quartett, Madame Camporese, Madlle, Caradori, Signori Curioni, and Placci, “Cielo il mio labro,” Rossini.—Part II.—1. Duet, Violoncello, Messrs. Lindley, Lindley.—2. Aria, Signor Garcia.—3. Quartett, Donna del Lago, Madame Camporese, Maddle. Caradori, Signo Placci, and Mr. Begrez. Rossini.—4. English Song, Mademoiselle Caradori, “Why with sighs.”—5. Fantasia, Flute, Mr. Nicholson, Nicholson.—6. French Romance, Mademoiselle Caradori, “La Fileuse,” Caradori.—7. Preghiera del Mosè, Madame Camporese, Mademoiselle Caradori, Signor Placci, Signor Garcia, and Mr. Begrez, Rossini.—Performance to begin at half-past Eight precisely.—Leader, Mr. Mori; Conductor, Signor Coccia.—Applications for Tickets to be made to Mr. Ebers, 27, Old Bond-street, and all the principal Musicsellers.

Reviews

The Morning Post (July 8, 1823): 1.

The splendid suite of rooms in Mrs. West’s residence in Bryanstone-square were last night thrown open for the accommodation of this favourite singer, and the fashionable audience who assembled on the occasion to enjoy the display of her powers and a variety of the first Performers. Amongst these were CAMPORESE, RONZI DE BEGNIS, GARCIA, CURIONI, MISS STEPHENS, and others of equal celebrity, On the Flute was Mr. NICHOLSON; the Messrs. LINDLEY on the Violoncello, and the unrivalled MOCHELLES on the Pianoforte. With these attractions a most delightful musical treat was enjoyed by those present. The favourite piece of the evening was a French Romance of exceeding sweetness, composed and executed by CARADORI. In this she was twice encored. Miss STEPHENS was encored in “Sweet Home,” a beautiful production of BISHOP’s. It was remarked that CARADORI acquired herself of an English song with the accent of a native.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (August 1823): 116.

Mademoiselle Caradori’s private benefit-concert, took place on Monday, July 7th at Mrs. West’s in Bryanstone Square, where a very elegant company was assembled. The performers consisted of all the strength of the King’s Theatre, with the addition of Miss Stephens, and M. Moschelles. Mori led, and Signior [sic] Coccia sat at the piano-forte as conductor.

30 June 1823

Vocal and Instrumental Music Concert

London: Lady Borough’s Residence, Portland-place

 

Programme

Principal Vocalists: all the principal performers of the opera      
Leader: Paolo Spagnoletti; Conductor: Signor Scappa

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Review

The Harmonicon, vol. I (August 1823): 116.

On Monday, the 30th of June, Signor Torri had a concert at the house of Lady Borough, in Portland-place, which was most fashionably attended. The whole of the principal performers of opera contribute their assistance; Spagnoletti led the band, and Scappa conducted.

6 June 1823

Johann Baptist Cramer’s Morning Concert

London: Willis’s Rooms, King Street

Time: Morning, One o’Clock

Tickets: 10s. 6d.

 

Programme

Part I    
Symphony No.39 in E flat major Mozart
SongMr. SapioCarafa  
Piano ConcertoMr. J. B. CramerCramer
SongMme CaradoriSigra
Grand Sonata in A flat major for Piano-Four Hands, Op.92Messrs. Cramer, KalkbrennerHummel
Duet[1]Mme Caradori, Mr. SapioMozart
Part II    
Quintet for Piano, Violin, Tenor, Violoncello, Contrabass (MS)     Messrs. Cramer, F. Cramer, Lindley, Moralt, DragonettiCramer
Madrigal for Four VoicesMiss Stephens, Messrs. Vaughan,T. Ford
 W. Knyvett, and Sale 
Fantasia for Harp, Flute, and Horn ObbligatoMessrs. Dizi, Nicholson, PuzziDizi
SongMiss Stephens 
Piano DuetMessrs. J. B. Cramer, MoschelesMoscheles
Principal Vocalists:  Miss Stephens, Mme Caradori; Messrs. J. B. Sale, Vaughan, Sapio, W. Knyvett      
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Cramer, Dizi, Dragonetti, F. Cramer, Kalkbrenner, Lindley, Moscheles, Signor Puzzi

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[1] The duet is included in the programme that was advertised by The Morning Chronicle on June 4 but not in the review by The Harmonicon.

Advertisements

John Bull (May 25, 1823): 161.

MR. CRAMER has the honour to announce that his MORNING CONCERT will take place at Willis’s Rooms, King-street, St. James’s, on FRIDAY, the 6th of June next, at One o’Clock.—Tickets, 10s, 6d. each, to be had at the Royal Harmonic Institution, Regent-street; Birchall and Co. New Bond-street; Goulding and Co. Soho-square; Betts, Royal Exchange; and at Mr. Cramer’s, No. 1. Old Quebec-street, Portman-square. Particulars of the Concert will be published in due time.

The Morning Post (May 29, 1823): 1.

MR. CRAMER has the honour to announce that his MORNING CONCERT will take place at Willis’s Rooms, King-street, St. James’s, on FRIDAY, June 6th. To begin precisely at One o’Clock.—Vocal Performers: Miss Stephens, and Signora Caradori; Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Wm. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Mr. Sapio. Principal Instrumental Performers: For the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, Mr. Cramer, and Mr. Kalkbrenner; Harp, Mr. Dizi; Flute, Mr. Nicholson; and Corno, Signor Puzzi. Messrs. F. Cramer, Lindley, and Dragonetti, &c.—Tickets, Half a Guinea each, to be had of Mr. Cramer, No. 1, Old Quebec-street, Portman-square: at the Regent’s Harmonic Institution, Regent-street; at the Music Shops of Messrs. Birchall, No. 133, New Bond-street; Messrs. Goulding, Soho-square; Messrs. Boosey, No. 28, Holles-street, Cavendish-square; and Betts’s, Royal Exchange.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (June 1823): 88.

Mr. Cramer has announced a Morning Concert for the 6th of June, at Willis’ Rooms.

John Bull (June 1, 1823): 169.

MR. CRAMER has the honour to announce that his MORNING CONCERT will take place at Willis’s Rooms, King-street, St. James’s, on FRIDAY, June 6th. To begin precisely at One o’Clock.—Vocal Performers: Miss Stephens, and Signora Caradori; Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Wm. Knyvett, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Mr. Sapio. Principal Instrumental Performers: for the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, Mr. Cramer, and Mr. Kalkbrenner; Harp, Mr. Dizi: Flute, Mr. Nicolson; and Corno, Signor Puzzi, Messrs. F. Cramer, Lindley, and Dragonetti, &c.—Tickets, 10s, 6d. each, to be had at of Mr. Cramer, No. 1, Old Quebec-street, Portman-square; at the Regent’s Harmonic Institution, Regent-street; Messrs. Goulding, Soho-square; Messrs. Boosey, No. 23, Holles-street, Cavendish-square; and Betts’s, Royal Exchange.

Particulars of the Concert will be published in due time.

The Morning Chronicle (June 4, 1823): 1.

Mr. CRAMER has the honour to announce, that his MORNING CONCERT will take place at Willis’s Rooms, King-street, St. James’s, on Friday next.—The Concert to commence at One o’clock precisely. —Part I. Grand Sinfonia (Mozart); Song, Mr. Sapio, Concerto, Piano-forte, Mr. Cramer (Cramer); Song, Signora Caradori; Grand Duet for two Performers on one Piano-forte, by Messrs, Cramer and Kalkbrenner (Hummel) : Duet, Mr. Sapio and Signora Caradori, Mozart.—Part II. New Quintetto (MS, by desire), for Piano-forte, Violin, Tenor, Violoncello, and Contra Basso, by Messrs. Cramer, F. Cramer, Lindley, Moralt, and Dragonetti (Cramer); Favorite Madrigal for Four voices, by Miss Stephens, Messrs. Vaughan, W. Knyvett, and Sale (T. Ford); Fantasia for harp, Flute, and Corno Obligato, by Messrs. Dizi, Nicholson, and Puzzi (Dizi); Song, Miss Stephens; Grand Duet for two Performers on one Piano-forte, by Messrs. Cramer and Moscheles (Moscheles); Finale.—Tickets, half a guinea each, to be had of Mr. Cramer, No. 1, Old Quebec-street, Portmant-square; and at all the principal Music Shops.

The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol. V, (May 1823): 258-259.

Mr. JOHN CRAMER even has announced a morning performance, for which we can only account by his being unable to fix an evening sufficiently carly [sic] in the season to secure himself an open night.*

* It is to be regretted that MR. CRAMER should have chosen the morning of the day fixed for MRs. SALMON’s evening concert. Since the text was written both have taken place, and the evening was decidedly injured by the morning performance. MR. CRAMER’s and MRs. SALMON’s connections lie in the very same circle. How was it to be expected that the same persons would go to a long morning concert, and again be present at an evening performance of the same cast? We regret to see distinguished artists thus clashing, but as Mr. CRAMER’s concert was announced long after MRs. SALMON’s, and as the mornings are so much less occupied than the evenings, it argues a little want of gallantry on the part of the great pianist towards the first of English vocalists.

Reviews

The Morning Chronicle (June 9, 1823) 3.

On Friday last Mr. CRAMER gave a Morning Concert at Willis’s Rooms, to one of the most crowded audiences (consisting chiefly of young elegant females) that we ever saw assembled. This celebrated composer and unrivalled performer played four several times during the morning:—first, a Concert of his own, with Accompaniments for a full band; next a Piano-forte Duet, by HUMMEL, in which he was joined by Mr. Kalkbrenner; afterwards, a Quintett, composed by himself for the Pianoforte, &c.; and lastly, a second Duet for the Piano-forte, by M. Moscheles, in which the composer took a part. The union was so admirable in this last piece, that it had the effect of being played by one person with four hands, and, notwithstanding its great length, riveted the attention of all present, including most of the great musical cognoscenti, who are always to be found amidst the throng whenever Mr. CRAMER displays his delightful talents.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (July 1823): 103.

MR. CRAMER’S CONCERT.

On Friday, June 6th, Mr. Cramer gave a morning concert at Willis’s Rooms; and, of course, drew together not only as many as the place would conveniently hold, but several who were content to be crowded into corners, or remain in the ante-chambers, rather than lose the opportunity of hearing this very celebrated performer. The concert consisted of the following pieces:—Symphony, Mozart; song, Carafa, sung by Mr. Sapio; Concerto, piano-forte, Mr. Cramer, composed by himself, (His 6th, in E flat, dedicated to Mrs. Francis George Smyth.) Song, Sigra. Caradori; grand duet, piano-forte, Hummel—performed by Messrs. Cramer and Kalkbrenner. In Part II. a new quintett, MS., for piano-forte, violin, tenor, violoncello, and contra basso, by Messrs. Cramer, F. Cramer, Lindley, Morale, and Dragonetti; Madrigal, Ford, sung by Miss Stephens, Messrs. Vaughan, W. Knyvett, and Sale; Fantasia, harp, &c. by Messrs. Dizi, &c.; song, Miss Stephens; and grand duett, piano-forte, by Messrs. Cramer and Moscheles, composed by the latter. We did not think the Concerto well chosen for general effect. The duet, by Hummel, is full of science, and is much extolled; nevertheless, we must consider it rather as the work of a learned musician, than a man of genius. The quintetto is a melodious, graceful composition, the simplicity of which, after the complicated contrivances in the duet of M. Hummel, operated as a grateful relief. The duet, by Moscheles, is the work of a superior and original mind, and was executed à merveille, otherwise it would have been thought too long.

Of Mr. Cramer’s talents, there is but one opinion, which was so well expressed, three or four years ago, in a daily paper, that we cut out the paragraph, and having fortunately preserved it, cannot do better than reprint it as the concluding part of this notice. “As a performer on the piano-forte, Cramer is unrivalled, and, we may perhaps venture to assert, every professor unreluctantly [sic] yields to him the palm. His brilliancy of execution is astonishing; but this quality, which is, in fact, purely mechanical, amounts to little or nothing in the general estimate of such merits as his: in taste, expression, feeling, the power that he possesses of almost making the instrument speak a language, are the attributes by which he is so eminently distinguished. The mere velocity of manual motion,—those legerdemain tricks which we are now and then condemned to witness, may entrap the unwary; the physical operation of sounds, whose rapidity of succession is incalculable, may be necessary to stimulate the indurated tympanums of some few dull ears; but those who love to have their sympathies awakened by the ‘eloquent music’ which this instrument may be made to ‘discourse,’ who derive any pleasure from the most social and innocent of the fine arts, and who would gain the practical advantages of an instructive lesson by listening to a delightful performance,—such persons should seize every opportunity that is afforded them of hearing Cramer.”

Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (September 3, 1823): 588-589.

J. B. Cramers Concert am 6ten Juni des Morgens in Willis’s Rooms. Diess war in jeder Rücksicht etwas sehr Neues und Eigentümliches, und daher mochte zum Theil das grosse Interesse, welches man gleich anfangs an der Sache nahm, kommen. Seit Jahren hat Hr. Cramer immer mit seinem  Bruder, dem Violinisten, gemeinschaftlich des Abends in den Hannover Square Rooms Concert gegeben, diessmal aber beliebte es ihm, es allein des Morgens und noch dazu an dem nämlichen Tage zu thun, wo die berühmte Sängerin Mad. Salmon ein Abendconcert gab. Alles diess erregte in Cramers Freunden Bangigkeit; dennoch ging alles vortrefflich und gewiss selbst über Hrn. Cramers Erwartung. So gross war das Gedränge, dass manche zufrieden seyn mussten, wenn sie nur ein Winkelchen in irgend einem Vorzimmer oder ein Plätzchen zum Stehen auf der Treppe bekommen konnten. Wenigstens 150 Personen waren ohne Sitze oder zum Hören schlecht gestellt. Es ist ganz überflüssig, zu er wähnen, dass die Concertstücke gut gewählt waren, wer könnte es von Cramers Geschmack anders erwarten? Es wurde mit der schönen Mozart’schen Symphonie in Es eröffnet, worauf, eines Zwischen gesanges von Carafa nicht zu erwähnen, der Concertgeber sein sechstes grosses Pianoforle- Conceit in Es dur mit seiner bekannten Meisterschaft vortrug. Nichts ist herzerhebender als einen so hochverdienten Künstler wie unseru Cramer Jahr aus Jahr ein mit unvermindertem Feuer auftreten zu sehen; es ist, als verjüngte sich sein Talent mit jedem Frühling, und es war gewiss nur Eine Stimme, dass er noch nie so schön gespielt habe als diessmal. Seine Stärke liegt bekanntlich im Adagio, denn hier findet er am besten Gelegenheit, seinen schönen, vollen Ton und feinen Geschmack im Vortrage zu zeigen. Ausser jenem Concert in Es spielte er noch ein Pianoforte-Quintett und zwey Pianoforte-Duos zn [sic] vier Händen, nämlich die schöne Sonate von Hummel Op. 92 mit Hrn. Kalkbrenner, und eine nicht minder gerühmte mit Hrn. Moscheles, dem Verfasser derselben. Diese beyden Duos waren offenbar die mächtigen Anziehungen für unsere Klavierspielerinnen; denn, die drey grössten Meister auf diesem Instrumente in dem Aufwände all ihrer Fähigkeiten vergleichen zu können, ist kein alltägliches Glück. Hr. Kalkbrenner, welcher die Oberstimme übernahm, brachte hier und da Zusätze und Verzierungen an, welche sich vielleicht nicht ganz mit dem rein klassischen Geiste des Hummel’schen Werks vertragen. Von dem Duo des Hrn. Moscheles, welcher auch die Ober stimme hatte, sagt das Harmonikon „es ist das Werk eines überlegenen, originellen Geistes, und wurde a merveille vorgetragen.“—Allen dreyen wurde der Beyfall, welcher so grossen und glänzenden Talenten gebührt.

17 May 1823

Royal Society of Musicians Anniversary Festival Dinner

London: New Argyll Rooms


 

Programme Note: Moscheles did not perform due to illness.


Programme

Hymn, ‘Non nobi’  
National Anthem, ‘God save the King’  
Glee for Four Voices with Chorus, ‘Come, Fairest Nymph’[?], [?], [?], [?], ChorusMornington
Duke of York’s March  Band  Eley
Glee for Three Voices and Chorus, ‘Rise to the battle, my thousands!’[?], [?], [?], ChorusAttwood
Violin SoloMr. Mori; Assisted by Messrs.
Calkin, F. Cramer, Neate, Pigot, Sherrington
Mori
Glee for Four Voices, ‘O my love’s like a red red rose’ W. Knyvett  
MarchDirected by Messrs. Kramer, WillmanHaydn
Glee for Five Voices, ‘Queen of the Valley’ Dr. Callcott
Piano FantasiaMr. Moscheles 
Madrigal for Five Voices, ‘Let me, careless and unthoughtful lying’   Linley
MarchDirected by Mr. Kramer and Mr. WillmanWinter
Song, ‘John Andersno, my joe’ (by desire)  Mr. Broadhurst 
Glee for Four Voices, ‘See the chariot at hand here of Love’ Horsley
Glee for Five Voices, ‘Mark’d you her eye of heavenly blue?’ Spofforth
Song, ‘Good old Days of Adam and Eve’Mr. Taylor 
Glee for Four Voices, ‘Foresters, sound the cheerful horn’ Bishop
Song, ‘Allan Water’Master Smith 
Glee for Four Voices and Chorus, ‘The mighty conqueror of hearts’[?], [?], [?], [?], ChorusWebbe
Song, ‘Sweet Home’Mr. CollyerParry
Principal Vocalists: Master Smith, Messrs. Broadhurst, Taylor
Principal Instrumentalists: Mr. Calkin, F. Cramer, Mori, Neate, Pigot, Sherrington

———————————

Advertisement

Programme

SELECTION OF MUSIC

TO BE PERFORMED AT THE

ANNIVERSARY FESTIVAL

OF THE

ROYAL SOCIETY OF MUSICIANS

HELD AT THE

NEW ARGYLL ROOMS,

ON

SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1823.

THE RIGHT HONORABLE THE EARL OF DERBY, PRESIDENT.

PRINCIPAL VOCAL PERFORMERS.

MESSRS. BELLAMY, BROADHURST, EVANS, ELLIOT, CLARK, COLLYER, T. COOKE, GOULDEN, HAWES, KING, LEETE, NIELD, PARRY, ROVEDINO,

J. SMITH, SALE, J. B. SALE, TERRAIL, C. TAYLOR, T. WELSH, VAUGHAN,

&c. &c. &c.

MASTER SMITH, WESLEY, AND CARD.

THE VOCAL PIECES WILL BE ACCOMPANIED ON THE PIANO FORTE,

ALTERNATELY BY

MESSRS. ATTWOOD, BISHOP, GREATOREX, AND HORSLEY,

SOLO PLAYERS.

VIOLIN, MR. MORI, PIANO FORTE, MR. MOSCHELLES;

Who have kindly consented to perform on the occasion.

WIND INSTRUMENTS.

MESSRS. KRAMER, WILLMAN, MAHON, FLEISCHER, MONZANI, ERSKINE, SHARP,

TULLY, MANCOUR, PETRIDES, HARPER, AND MARRIOTTI.

[The rest of the programme includes the pieces performed, including the lyrics of the songs]

[GB-Lbl Playbills 220]

Reviews

The Morning Post (May 19, 1823): 3.

ROYAL SOCIETY OF MUSICIANS.

The Anniversary Dinner of this Institution took place on Saturday last at the Argyll Rooms, at six o’clock. Earl FORTESCUE took the Chair, in consequence of the sudden indisposition of the Earl of DERBY.

Upwards of two hundred Gentlemen sat down to a most excellent dinner, provided by WADD, of Bond-street. The boxes were filled with “England’s matchless beauty.” Nothing could surpass the splendour of tHe scene; the Rooms being so elegant and brilliantly lighted, reminded us of the banquets read of in the Arabian Nights.

A list of the toasts, together with the words of the glees, &c. which were performed, had been prepared and distributed about the room—a very commendable thing done by the Stewards.

When the cloth was removed, Non Nobis Domine was sung in a most sublime manner; then followed the toast of “The King,” and our fine National Anthem was exquisitely performed, accompanied on wind instruments. We shall not follow the toasts, &c. &c. regularly, but merely state, that the fine glee of Come, fairest Nymph—ATTWOOD’S Rise to the Battle—W. KNYVETT’S My love is like the red red rose—CALLCOTT’S Queen of the Valley—and HORSLEY’S elegant composition, See the Chariot at hand—were performed in the most masterly manner—Messrs. ATTWOOD, HORSLEY, and GREATOREX, presiding alternately at the Pianoforte.

Mr. DANCE rose to propose the health of the Noble President, which he prefaced by stating how much the Society was indebted to his Lordship, and to the other Noble Director, of the Ancient Concerts. Mr. D. concluded a very feeling address, by quoting our immortal Bard’s definition of mercy, which, he said, might be, with great propriety, applied to charity.

Lord FORTESCUE (who laboured under a severe cold), assured the company, that the welfare of the Society was dear to his heart, and that he would, at all limes, his utmost to promote it.

Mr. HAWES rose to propose the health of the Royal and Noble Vice-Presidents; and, in doing so, he touched on great claim, which have lately come on the Society’s funds. “A dark cloud hangs over us at this moment,” said he, “and I fear that the Governors will be under the painful necessity of reducing the allowance to the claimants, which would be a melancholy proceeding, or draw on the funded property of the Society, which would be a ruinous alternative. But the cloud will pass over; yes, your bounty will disperse it, and the aged musician, the widow and the orphan, will invoke blessings on their excellent benefactors.”

A Gentleman rose in the body of the room and said that he was a life subscriber; but before he could give further aid, he wished to see a statement-of the accounts, a regular debtor and creditor in black and white. He was informed that the Society’s books were always open for his inspection, but at such a meeting as the present to enter into long details of accounts would only interrupt the harmony of the bay. This did not satisfy him. He persisted in addressing the Chair, to the great annoyance of the company, particularly the Ladies. But this discordant scene had its effect, for it rendered Master SMITH’S song of Allan Water doubly sweet, and C. TAYLOR’S Good old Days of Adam and Eve restored harmony and good humour. Mr. MORI performed a polonaire on the violin, in a manner that drew down universal applause. He was assisted by Messrs. F. CRAMER, PIGOT, SHERRINGTON, CALKIN, and NEATE, who kindly volunteered their services at a moment’s notice.

Mr. MOSCHELES was to have performed a Fantasia on the Pianoforte, but he was taken very unwell, and confined to his bed. He sent a very handsome apology.

The Military Band, under the direction of Mr. KRAMER and Mr. WILLMAN performed HAYDN’S and WINTER’S Grand Marches, composed for the Society by those eminent authors, in a most effective style. BISHOP’S beautiful Glee of “Foresters, sound the cheerful horn,” was loudly encored. COLLYER sung PARRY’S song of “Sweat Home,” in a very chaste manner.

Several donations were given, and many life and annual subscribers were obtained. We were particularly pleased to hear, among the life subscribers, the name of our beautiful warbler, Miss STEPHENS.

Doctor NICHOLAS, Chaplain of the Society, on his health being drank, returned thanks in a very humourous [sic] speech, which was particularly complimentary to the Ladies, for the Learned Gentleman said, “That men were nothing without the women.” He touched upon ancient Greece, and then concluded by making a strong appeal to the company in behalf of the Society.

The Morning Advertiser (May 20, 1823): 2.

Royal Society of Musicians Anniversary Dinner at the Argyll Rooms, May 17, 1823: ‘Mr. Moschelles was to have performed a Fantasia on the Piano-forte, but he was taken very unwell, and confined to his bed. He sent a very handsome apology’.

1 May 1823

New Musical Fund Benefit Concert

London: King’s Theatre—Time: Evening

Subscription Concert: 1 Guinea for two Gallery Tickets to every Benefit Concert,

10 Guineas for two Tickets to every Benefit Concert for Life

Boxes and Pit, 10s. 6d. Gallery, 1s.

 

Programme

Part I    
Overture, Die Zauberflöte Mozart
From Jephtha
Recit and Air, ‘Pour forth no more’  
‘No more to Ammon’s’
   ChorusHandel
Aria, ‘Una voce al cor mi parla’Miss Goodall; Clarinet Obbligato: Mr. WillmanPaër
Aria, ‘La mia cara’Mr. Begrez 
From La gazza ladra
Aria, ‘Di piacer mi balza il cor’
Signora CamporeseRossini
Piano Concerto [No.4 in E major]  Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
From La clemenza di Tito  
Duet, ‘Ah, perdona al primo affetto’
Mme Caradori-Allan, Signora CamporeseMozart
Recit. ‘Pegno più grato’ (MS)Miss PatonMme Catalani
Aria, ‘Mio ben per te’Miss PatonPucitta
Grand Coronation Anthem,
‘I was glad when they said unto to me’
(as performed in Westminster Abbey at the Coronations of His Majesty)
 Attwood
Part II    
Concertante for Two Violoncello ObbligatiMr Lindley, Mr. Lindley jun.Lindley
National, Anthem, ‘God save the King’: One VerseChorus 
From Il barbiere di Siviglia
Air, ‘Tyrant, soon I’ll burst thy chains’  
(Una voce poco fa)  
Miss TreeRossini
From Il Turco in Italia:
Quintet, ‘Oh! guardate che accidente’
Signora de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Mr. Duruset, Signors de Begnis, PlacciRossini
Violin PotpourriMr. Grund  
(first performance in the country)
Spohr
‘Luther’s Hymn’Mr. Braham; Organ: Sir George Smart 
Duet, ‘Io di tutto’Signora de Begnis, Signor de BegnisMosca
From L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato  
Air ‘Sweet Bird’
Miss Stephens; Flute Obbligato: Mr. Nicholson  Handel
From The Creation: Grand Chorus  
‘Achieved is the glorious work’
ChorusHandel
Principal Vocalists: Mme Caradori-Allan, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, Miss Stephens, Miss Tree, Signora Camporese, Signora de Begnis; Messrs. Begrez, Bellamy, Braham, Signors de Begnis, Placci      
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Grund, Lindley, Lindley jun. Moscheles, Nicholson, Sir George Smart, Willman
Leader: Mr. Franz Cramer; Conductor: Sir George Smart

———————————

Advertisements

Playbill

NEW MUSICAL FUND.

SONGS, CHORUSES, &c.

PERFORMED IN

The King’s Theatre, Haymarket,

On THURSDAY, the 1st of MAY, 1823,

FOR THE BENEFIT OF

The New Musical Fund,

ESTABLISHED APRIL 16,1786,

FOR THE RELIEF OF

Decayed Musicians, their Widows and Orphans.

TO WHICH IS ADDED

A LIST OF THE SUBSCRIBERS,

BOTH HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL.

London:

PRINTED FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE SOCIETY,

By J. Mallett, 59, Wardour Street, Soho.

☞PRICE ONE SHILLING ONLY,

And the Women who sell them are positively ordered by the Committee to ask no more.

ADVERTISEMENT.

                                               To the Nobility, Gentry, and Public in general.

THE Committee and Court of Assistants for conducting the affairs of this charitable Institution, beg leave to address the Nobility and Gentry, their Subscribers, and the Public in general, in behalf of their poor and distressed Brethren; who, after having spent their best days in contributing to the amusement and pleasure of the Community at large, are now, in their age and infirmity, rendered incapable of affording them-selves those comforts which their situation requires. For the purpose, therefore, of ameliorating the severity of want to the aged Musician and Family, this Institution was founded; the Subscription to which is One Guinea per annum, or Ten Guineas for a Life Subscription; for which the person so subscribing is entitled to two Tickets for the Annual Concert, which will take place this year on Friday, the third of June, at the Opera House in the Haymarket. They therefore humbly solicit the assistance of the charitable and humane, either in subscriptions or donations, in support of a Fund founded on such liberal principles. They are now expending, in relief of their distressed Brethren, nearly SIX HUNDRED POUNDS per Annum; but, having been considerable losers in their funded Property by the change of the five per cents. to the fours, and by the death of many of their old friends who were subscribers, they find great difficulty in continuing the usual allowance to their indigent Brethren. They look forward, therefore, with considerable confidence, to a generous Public, and particularly to the Lovers of Harmony.

The Committee have only to add, in the name of themselves and the Society at large, their grateful thanks to their Subscribers, and to the Public in general, for past favours; from which alone the Society has been enabled to succeed thus far in its charitable intentions.

                                                                           By order of the Committee,

JAMES KING, Secretary.

15, Little Chapel Street, Soho.

N.B. Every Honorary Subscriber paying ONE GUINEA annually, will receive Two Tickets of Admission to every BENEFIT CONCERT of the Society; and every one subscribing TEN GUINEAS at one Payment, will, in like manner, be entitled to Two Tickets annually, and be considered a SUBSCRIBER FOR LIFE.

Subscriptions received at Messrs. HAMMERSLEY and Co.’s, Bankers, Pall Mall; Messrs. MARSH, SIBBALD, and Co.’s, Bankers, 6, Berners Street; the principal Music Shops; by J. KENDRICK, Esq.

Treasurer, No. 6, Upper Mary-la-bonne Street; at the Secretary’s, Mr. KING, 15, Little Chapel Street, Soho; and at the Opera Office.

Leader of the Band, . . .  Mr. F. CRAMER.

Conductor, . . . . . . . Sir GEORGE SMART.

PRINCIPAL VOCAL PERFORMERS.

Madame CAMPORESE,Madame RONZI DE BEGNIS,
Mademoiselle CARADORI,Miss GOODALL,
ANDAND
Miss M. TREE.Miss PATON.

AND

Miss STEPHENS.

Mr. BRAHAM,

Signor DE BEGNIS, Signor BEGREZ, Signor PLACCI

Mr. DURUSET,

AND

Mr. BELLAMY

PRINCIPAL INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMERS.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

Mr. GRUND

(His 1st Public Performance in this Country,) 1st Violin to His Serene Highness the Duke of Saxe Meiningen.

Mr. LINDLEY and Mr. W. LIDNLEY.

The Choruses will be supported by many of the Gentlemen Choristers of the Antient

Concert, the Young Gentlemen of his Majesty’s Chapel Royal, St. Pauls’ Cathe-

dral, and Westminster Abbey; and the celebrated Chorus Singers from Lancashire.

THE INSTRUMENTAL BAND

Is selected from the Performers of the Opera House, the Concert of Antient Music,

and the Members of this Society, &c.

NEW MUSICAL FUND CONCERT,

THURSDAY, the 1st of MAY, 1823.

ACT I.
Grand Overture to Zauberflöte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Mozart.
Recit. and Air, Mr. BELLAMY, “Pour Forth no more,” and Chorus, “No more to
     Ammon’s”. . . . . . . .(Jephthah.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Handel.
Aria, Miss GOODALL, “Una voce al cor mi parla;”
     (Clarinet Obligato, Mr. WILLMAN.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paer.
Aria, Signor BEGREZ, “Il mio tesoro.” . . . . . . . . (Il Don Giovanni.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mozart.
Concerto, Grand Piano Forte, Mr. MOSCHELES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Moscheles.
Duetto, Madame CAMPORESE and Mademoiselle CARADORI, “Ah! perdona.”
     (Tito.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mozart.
Recit. (MS.) Miss PATON, “Pegno più grato;” the Poetry and Music by Catalani:
     and Aria, “Mio ben perte.” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pucitta.
Grand Coronation Anthem, “I was glad;” (as performed in Westminster Abbey at  
     the Coronation of His Majesty.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Attwood.
ACT II. 
Concertante for Two Violoncelli Obligati, Mr. LINDLEY and Mr. LINDLEY, jun. 
Lindley. 
Air, Miss M. TREE, “Tyrant, soon I’ll burst thy chains.” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rossini. 
Quintetto, Madame RONZI DE BEGNIS, Miss GOODALL, Mr. DURUSET, 
     Signor PLACCI, and Signor DE BEGIS, “Oh! Guardate che accidente.” 
    (Il Turco in Italia.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rossini. 
Pot-Pourri for the Violin, Mr. GRUND, (his 1st Public Performance in this Coutnry)..Spohr. 
Luther’s Hymn, Mr. BRAHAM, (accompanied on the Organ by Sir GEORGE SMART.) 
Duetto, Madame RONZI DE BEGNIS and Signor DE BEGNIS, “Io di tutto.” . . .     Mosca. 
Recit. and Air, Miss STEPHENS, “Sweet bird!”   (Flute Obligato, Mr. Nicholson.) 
     (Il Pensieroso.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Handel. 
Grand Chorus, “Achieved is the glorious work.” . . . . . . . . . .(Creation.) . . . . . . . . . . . . Haydn. 

 [The rest of the programme includes the pieces performed with the lyrics of the songs]

[GB-Lbl C.61.g.20.]

The Morning Chronicle (April 12, 1823): 1.

NEW MUSICAL FUND.—Under the immediate Patronage of his most Excellent MAJESTY.—The Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to this Charitable Institution, and Public in general, are respectfully informed, that the CONCERT for the BENEFIT of DECAYED MUSICIANS, their WIDOWS and ORPHANS, will take place at the Opera House as usual on Thursday the 1st of May, when the Committee hope for the assistance of their generous Benefactors.—The following principal Performers have most kindly promised their assistance :—Madame Camporese, Mdlle. Caradori and Miss M. Tree; Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall and Miss Paton, Miss Stephens and Mr. Braham, Signor de Begnis, J. B. Sale, Signor Begrez and Mr. Bellamy. A Concerto on the Grand Piano-forte by Mr. Moscheles; a Concertante for Two Violoncellos, Mr. Lindley and Mr. W. Lindley—Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Sir George Smart.—Subscriptions and donations received by Mr. James King, the Secretary, 15, Little Chapel-street, Soho: and by Joseph Kendrick, Esq. No. 6, Upper Mary-le-bone street; likewise Tickets for the Pit and Boxes at 10s. 5d. and Gallery 1s, to be had of them; at all the principal Music-shops; and at the Opera Office, Mr. Eber’s Library, Old Bond street.

The Morning Chronicle (April 26, 1823): 1.

NEW MUSICAL FUND, Established for the RELIEF of DECAYED MUSICIANS, their WIDOWS and ORPHANS.—Under the immediate Patronage of his most Excellent MAJESTY, their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of York, Cumberland, Sussex, Cambridge, and Gloucester. Patronesses—Her Royal Highness, the Duchess of Kent.—The Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to this Fund, and Public in general, are respectfully informed that the ANNUAL CONCERT for the BENEFIT of this FUND will take place on Thursday next, at the Opera House, Haymarket, when they hope for the assistance of their Benefactors.—The following principal Performers have most kindly promised their assistance :—Madame Camporese, Madlle. Caradori and Miss M. Tree; Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall and Miss Paton, and Miss Stephens, Mr. Braham, Signor de Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Placci, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Mr. Bellamy. A Concerto on the Grand Piano-forte by Mr. Moscheles; Pot Pourri for the Violin by Mr. Grund (his first public performance in this country), First Violin to his Serene Highness the Duke of Saxe Meiningen; a Concertante for Trio Violoncellos, Mr. Lindley and Mr. W. Lindley.—Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Sir George Smart.—Subscriptions received, and Tickets delivered for the Pit and Boxes at 10s. 6d. and for the Gallery at 1s, each, by the Treasurer, Joseph Kendrick, Esq. No. 6, Upper Mary-le-bone street; and by the Secretary, Mr. James King, 15, Little Chapel-street, Soho. Tickets may also be had at the principal Musicshops.

The Morning Chronicle (April 29, 1823): 1.

[Same as issued in The Morning Chronicle on April 26]

John Bull (April 27, 1823): 1.

NEW MUSICAL FUND, Established for the RELIEF of DECAYED MUSICIANS, their WIDOWS and ORPHANS. Under the immediate Patronage of his most Excellent Majesty, their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of York, Cumberland, Sussex, Cambridge, and Gloucester. Patronesses, Her Royal Highness, the Duchess of Kent — —The Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to this Fund, and Public in general, are respectfully informed that the ANNUAL CONCERT for the BENEFIT of this FUND will take place THURSDAY NEXT, the 1st of MAY, at the Opera House, Haymarket, when they hope for the assistance of their benefactors.—The following principal Performers have most kindly promised their assistance :—Madame Camporese, Mademoiselle Caradori, Miss Tree, Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall, Miss Paton, and Miss Stephens; Mr. Braham, Signor de Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Placci, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Mr. Bellamy. A Concerto on the Grand Pianoforte by Mr. Moscheles; Pot Pourri for the Violin by Mr. Grund (his first public performance in this country), first Violin to his Serene Highness the Duke of Saxe Meinengen. A Concertante for Trio Violoncellos, Mr. Lindley and Mr. W. Lindley. Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer. Conductor, Sir George Smart.——Subscriptions received, and Tickets delivered for the Pit and Boxes at 10s. 6d. and for the Gallery at 5s, each, by the Treasurer, Joseph Kendrick, Esq. No. 6, Upper Mary-le-bone-street; and by the Secretary, Mr. James King, No. 15, Little Chapel street, Soho. Tickets may also be had at the principal Music-shops, and at Mr. Ebers’ Library, Old Bond street, the Opera office.

The Morning Chronicle (May 1, 1823): 1.

NEW MUSICAL FUND, Established for the RELIEF of DECAYED MUSICIANS, their WIDOWS and ORPHANS.—Under the immediate Patronage of his most Excellent MAJESTY, their Royal Highnesses the Dukes of York, Cumberland, Sussex, Cambridge, and Gloucester. Patronesses—Her Royal Highness, the Duchess of Clarence, and her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent.—The Nobility and Gentry, Subscribers to this Fund, and Public in general, are respectfully informed that the ANNUAL CONCERT for the BENEFIT of this FUND will take place THIS EVENING at the Opera House, Haymarket, when they hope for the assistance of their Benefactors.—The following principal Performers have most kindly promised their assistance :—Madame Camporese, Mdlle. Caradori and Miss M. Tree; Madame Ronzi de Begnis, Miss Goodall and Miss Paton, and Miss Stephens, Mr. Braham, Signor de Begnis, Signor Begrez, Signor Placci, Mr. J. B. Sale, and Mr. Bellamy. A Concerto on the Grand Piano-forte by Mr. Moscheles; Pot Pourri for the Violin by Mr. Grund (his first public performance in this country), First Violin to his Serene Highness the Duke of Saxe Meiningen; a Concertante for Trio Violoncellos, Mr. Lindley and Mr. W. Lindley.—Leader of the Band, Mr. F. Cramer; Conductor, Sir George Smart.—Subscriptions received, and Tickets delivered for the Pit and Boxes at 10s. 6d. and for the Gallery at 1s, each, by the Treasurer, Joseph Kendrick, Esq. No. 6, Upper Mary-le-bone street; and by the Secretary, Mr. James King, 15, Little Chapel-street, Soho. Tickets may also be had at the principal Music-shops.

Review

The Morning Post (May 3, 1823): 3.

NEW MUSICAL FUND.

We have to state, with great pleasure, that the Annual Concert for this laudable Institution, which took place on Thursday night at the King’s Theatre, was attended by a very numerous audience. This Pit was filled at an early hour, and also the place assigned to the Orchestra on Opera nights. The Gallery also was crowded to excess, and very few of the Boxes appeared without visitors. The Orchestra was erected on the Stage, and was abundantly supplied with the best instrumental Performers. There was also a very numerous train of Chorus Singers, male and female. The Band was led by Mr. F. CRAMER, and the whole was under the conduct of Sir GEORGE SMART. It was indeed manifest that the Society and their Treasurer, Mr. KENDRICK, had exerted themselves to the utmost to render the entertainment as gratifying to the external senses as to the feelings of benevolence. The whole was the triumph of talents and humanity.

5 March 1823

Oratorio Concert/A Grand Performance of Ancient and Modern Music

London: Theatre Royal, Drury Lane

Time: Evening, Seven o’Clock

Tickets: Boxes 7s., Pit 3s. 6d., Lower Gallery 2s., Upper Gallery 1s., Second Price at 9.

 

Programme

Part I  
A Grand Selection
From Jephtha: ‘When his loud voice’ChorusHandel
From Judas Maccabæus:  Air, ‘Pious orgies’  Miss StephensHandel
From Alexander’s Feast: Recit. and Air      
‘Softly Sweet in Lydian measures’
Mr. Sapio;
Violoncello Obbligato: Mr. Brooks
Handel
From Judas Maccabæus: Recit. and Air  
‘So shall the lute and harp awake’
Mrs. Salmon; Harp: Mr. Bochsa;  
Organ: Sir George Smart
Handel
Scena and Aria, ‘Superbo di metesco’  
(composed for this occasion)
Mr. BrahamCianchettini
AirMiss GoodallMoore
Trio and Chorus, ‘Sound the loud timbrel’Miss Goodall, Messrs. Nelson, Terrail, Chorus[Avison]
From Solomon: Air, ‘What though I trace’Miss TreeHandel
‘Luther’s Hymn’Mr. Braham 
From Tancredi
Recit., ‘Tu che accendi questo core’
Aria, ‘Di tanti palpiti’
Miss PatonRossini
Grand Piano Variations on a Military March with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations) Mr. Moscheles
(last appearance at the oratorios)
 Moscheles
Part II 
A Sacred Oratorio, Palestine Part I (first time at this performances). Words from a poem by Rev. R. Heber set to Music by William Crotch
Overture   
Solo and Chorus, ‘Reft of thy sons’Mr. Terrail, Chorus
Recit., ‘Is this thy place’Mr. Kellner
Air, ‘Ye guardian saints’Harp Obbligato: Mr Bochsa
‘O happy once’Chorus
Air, ‘But now thy sons’Mr. Sapio and Chorus
Air, ‘O thou their guide’Miss Paton
‘O feeble boast’Chorus
‘Let Sinai tell’Chorus
Recit., ‘But who shall dare’Mr. Nelson
Air, ‘Awe struck I cease’ 
Recit., ‘Such were the cares’Miss Tree
Air, ‘Triumphant race’ 
Recit., ‘And he the Royal Sage’Mr. Braham
Air, ‘To him were known’ 
‘Hence all his might’Chorus
Air, ‘Yet ‘e’en the works’Miss Goodall
Air, ‘In Frantic converse’Semi-Chorus
Duet, ‘Such the faint echo’Miss Paton, Mr. Braham
Air, ‘For thee his iv’ry load’Mr. Kellner
Recit. ‘No workman steel’Mr. Nelson
Air and Chorus, ‘Then the harp awoke’Chorus
Part III   
A Sacred Oratorio, Palestine Part II (first time at this performances). Words from a poem by Rev. R. Heber set to Music by William Crotch
Air, ‘Did Israel shrink?’Mr. Sapio
Air, ‘E’en they who dragged’Miss Povey; Harp Obbligato: Mr. Bochsa
‘Nor vain their hope’Chorus
Quartet, ‘Lo! stan-led Chiefs’Miss Goodall, Miss M. Tree,Messrs. Braham, KellnerMiss Goodall, Miss M. Tree,
‘Daughter of Sion’Chorus
‘He Comes’Chorus
Quartet, ‘Be peace on earth’Miss Povey, Messrs. Nelson, Sapio, Terrail
Recit., ‘Though palsied earth’Mr. Kellner
Air and Chorus, ‘Are these his limbs?’Chorus
Air, ‘Ye faithful few’Miss Tree
Air, ‘Vengeance, thy fiery wing’Mr. Braham
Recit. acc., ‘Yet heavier far’Mr. Kellner
Air, ‘Ah! fruitful now no more’ 
Quartet, ‘Then on your tops’Miss Goodall, Messrs. Braham, Nelson, Terrail, Chorus
Air, ‘No more your thirsty rocks’Mrs. Salmon
Air, ‘But who is he?’Mr. Nelson
Sestest, ‘Lo! Cherub Bands’Mrs. Salmon, Miss Paton, Messrs. Braham, Kellner, Sapio, Terrail
Recit. ‘And Shall not Israel’s sons’  Mrs. Salmon
Solo and Chorus, ‘Hark! white-robed’ crowdsMrs. Salmon, Chorus
‘Worthy the Lamb. Hallelujah. Amen’Chorus
Principal Vocalists:  Miss Goodall, Miss M. Tree, Miss Paton, Miss Povey, Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens; Master Longhurst, Messrs. Braham, Kellner, Nelson, Sapio, Terrail    
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Bochsa, Brooks, Moscheles, Signor Puzzi  
Leader: Leader, Mr. Henry Smart; Conductor: Sir George Smart  

———————————

Encore: Air, ‘No more your thirsty rocks’—Mrs. Salmon


Moscheles: Today there was an Oratorio Concert where, among other things, besides a deal of secular music, we had the whole of Crotch’s Oratorio, Palestine. How, I ask, must nerves be organized which can endure so much heterogeneous music?’. [RMM, 49]

Advertisements

The Morning Chronicle (March 3, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.

—On Wednesday next, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.—Part I. A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the First and Second Parts, Fantasia and grand Variations on the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, his last appearance at these Performances.—Parts II and III. (first time at these Performances) PALESTINE, a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose Permission this Work will be Performed).—Principal Vocal Performers: Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart; Leader, Mr. H. Smart.—It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed, by particular desire, on Friday next, being the only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

The Morning Post (March 3, 1823): [2].

The announcement of Dr. CROTCH’S celebrated Oratorio, Palestine, on Wednesday next, at the Theatre Royal, Drury-lane, has created great curiosity in the musical world. This highly-effective composition was only performed twice in 1813, but with the most extraordinary success. Since then it has been treasured up by the Author, but it afford us great pleasure to hear that Mr. BOCHSA has at length obtained permission to have it performed during the Lent Musical Performances.

Morning Advertiser (March 4, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROAYL, DRURY-LANE. TO-MORROW, (Wednesday,) March 5, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

Part I. A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the first and second Parts, Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton—Tu ch’ accendi; Fantasia and grand variations on the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, his last appearance at these Performances.

Parts II and III. (1st time at these Performances) PALESTINE, a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose permission this Work will be performed). Full Particulars are given in the Small Bills.

Principal Vocal Performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton. Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner.

Conductor Sir George Smart.—Leader, Mr. H. Smart.

It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed, by particular desire, on Friday next, the 7th inst. Being the only time his Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser (March 4, 1823): 1.

 THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.

TO-MORROW EVENING, the 5th Instant.

A GRAND PERFORMANCE OF ANCIENT AND

MODERN MUSIC

Under the direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

PART I.—A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the First and Second Parts, Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton—Tu ch’ accendi; Fantasia and Grand Variations on the Piano Forte, Mr. Moscheles (his last appearance at these Performances)

PART II and III.—(First time at these Performances) PALESTINE, a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose Permission this Work will be performed).—Full particulars are given in the small Bills.

Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss Paton; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton. Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner.

Conductor, Sir George Smart. Leader, Mr. H. Smart.

It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the Additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed (by particular desire), on Friday, the 7th Instant, being the only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

Morning Advertiser (March 5, 1823): 2.

The advert is identical to the advert of March 4, except that “TO-MORROW, (Wednesday,)” is replaced with “THIS EVENING (Wednesday)”.

Playbill (March 5, 1823).

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE.

The Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, are respectfully informed, that a GRAND PERFORMANCE of

ANTIENT AND MODERN MUSIC,

Will take place at the above Theatre,

THIS EVENING, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5th, 1823,

Under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

A NEW AND SUPERB ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated by Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

PART I.

A SELECTION.

Chorus—When his loud voice…………(Jephthah.)………………….Handel.
Air, Miss STEPHENS—Pious orgles…(Judas Maccabæus.)………….Handel.
Recit. ed Aria, Mr. SAPIO—Softly sweet in Lydian measures—Violoncello
      Obligato, Mr. BROOKS……..(Alexander’s Feast.)………………..Handel.
Recit. and Air, Mrs. SALMON—So shall the lute and harp awake.—
     Accompanied on the Harp and Organ by Mr. BOCHSA and
     Sir GEORGE SMART………………….(Judas Macc.)…………….Handel.
Scena ed Aria, Mr. BRAHAM—Superbo di metesso. (Composed expressly for
     these Performances.)…………………………………………Pio Cianchettini.
Air, Miss GOODALL, and Trio, with Mr. TERRAIL and Mr. NELSON;
     and Chorus—Sound the loud timbrel. (From Moores sacred Songs, newly
     arranged with orchestral Accompaniments.)
Air, Miss. M. TREE—What though I trace…….(Solomon.)……………Handel.
Luther’s Hymn (by express Desire)—Mr. BRAHAM.

Between the First and Second Parts,

Scena ed Aria, Miss PATON, “Tu ch’ accendi.”………………..Rossini.     

THE EMPEROR ALEXANDER’S FAVOURITE MARCH, with Variations for the Grand Piano Forte,

MR. MOSCHELES,

 (His last Appearance at these Performances.)

Part II and III.

(FIRST TIME AT THESE PERFORMANCES,)

PALESTINE,

A SACRED ORATORIO,

IN TWO PARTS,

The Words from a Prize Poem by the Rev. R. HEBER—set to Music by

WILLIAM CROTCH, Mus. Doc.

Professor of Music in the University of Oxford, by those Permission this Oratorio will be performed.

PART FIRST.  
Overture.
Solo, Mr. TERRAIL, and Chorus—Reft of thy sons.  
Recit. Mr. KELLNER—Is this thy place. Air—Ye guardians saints.
Harp Obligato, Mr. BOCHSA.
Chorus—O happy once.
Air, Mr. SAPIO, and Chorus—But now thy sons.
Air, Miss PATON—O thou their guide.
Chorus—O feeble boast.  
Chorus—Let Sinai tell.  
Recit. Mr. NELSON—But who shall dare.  Air—Awe struck, I cease.
Recit. Miss M. TREE—Such were the cares. Air—Triumphant race.  
Recit. Mr. BRAHAM—And he, the Royal Sage. Air—To him were known.
Chorus—Hence all his might.
Air, Miss GOODALL—Yet e’e’n the works. Y
Air, and Semi-Chorus—In frantic converse.  
Duet, Miss PATON and Mr. BRAHAM—Such the faint echo.
Air, Mr. KELLNER—For thee his iv’ry load.
Recit. accompanied, Mr. NELSON—No workman steel. n
Air and Chorus—Then the harp awoke.  
PART SECOND.
Air, Mr. SAPIO—Did Israel shrink?  
Air, Miss POVEY—E’en they who dragged. Harp Obligato, Mr. BOCHSA.  
Chorus—Nor vain their hope.  
Quartet, Miss GOODALL, Miss M. TREE, Mr. BRAHAM, and
Mr. KELLNER—Lo! star-lewd chiefs.
Chorus—Daughter of Sion. Chorus—He comes.  
Quartet, Miss POVEY, Mr. TERRAIL, Mr. SAPIO, and Mr. NELSON—  
Be peace on earth.  
Recit. Mr. KELLNER—Though palsied earth.  
Air, and Chorus—Are these his limber?  
Air, Miss M. TREE—Ye faithful few.    
Air, Mr. BRAHAM—Vengeance, thy fiery wing.  
Recit. acc. Mr. KELLNER—Yet heavier far. Air—Ah! fruitful now no more.  
Quartet, Miss GOODALL, Mr. TERRAIL, Mr. BRAHAM, & Mr. NELSON,
and Chorus—Then on your tops.  
Air, Mrs. SALMON—No more your thirsty rocks.
Air, Mr. NELSON—But who is he?
Sestet, Mrs. SALMON, Miss PATON, Mr. TERRAIL, Mr. BRAHAM,
Mr. SAPIO, and Mr. KELLNER—Lo! Cherub Bands.    
Recit. accompanied, Mrs. SALMON—And shall not Israel’s sons. A
Solo, Mrs. SALMON, and Chorus—Hark! white-robed crowds.  
Chorus—Worthy the Lamb. Hallelujah. Amen.

PRINCIPAL VOCAL PERFORMERS.

Mrs. SALMONMiss STEPHENS,
Miss GOODALL,Miss POVEY,
ANDAND
Miss M. TREE.Miss PATON.

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. SAPIO,

Mr. TERRAIL,     Mr. NELSON,      Master Longhurst,

and    Mr. KELLNER,

PRINCIPAL INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMERS

Grand Piano Forte, Mr. MOSCHELES

AND

Harp, Mr. BOCHSA.

The Band will be numerous, and Complete in every Department. Leader, Mr. SMART.

SIR GEORGE SMART,

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by Mr. GRAY.

….

The Performers in the Choruses, under the Superintendence of Mr. WATSON, will be numerous, and assisted by the Young Gentlemen of

His Majesty’s Chapel Royal, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and Westminster Abbey.

Books of the Performance to be had in the Theatre only, Price 10d. Boxes, Places, & Tickets may be had of Mr. SPRING, at the Box Office, from 11 to 4.

Doors will be opened at half-past Six. The Performance will commence at Seven o’Clock.

The Public are most respectfully acquainted that Places in the Dress Circle can only be secured by paying the Price of Admission when they are taken.

Boxes, 7s. Pit, 3s. 6d. Lower Gallery, 2s. Upper Gallery, 1s. Second Price at Nine.

                                                                                                                                                    [GB-Lbl Playbills 56]

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser (March 5, 1823): 1.

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.

TO-MORROW EVENING, the 5th Instant.

A GRAND PERFORMANCE OF ANCIENT AND

MODERN MUSIC

Under the direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

PART I.—A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the First and Second Parts, Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton—Tu ch’ accendi; Fantasia and Grand Variations on the Piano Forte, Mr. Moscheles (his last appearance at these Performances)

PARTS II and III.—(First time at these Performances) PALISTINE, a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose Permission this Work will be performed).—Full particulars are given in the small Bills.

Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton. Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner.

Conductor, Sir George Smart. Leader, Mr. H. Smart.

It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the Additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed (by particular desire), on Friday, the 7th Instant, being the only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

The Theatrical Observer (March 5, 1823): 2-4.

New Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

Oratorios.

In the Selection which Mr. BOCHSA presents us with this evening, dr. CROTCH’s Oratorio of Palestine, forms the chief attraction. The words of this Oratorio of Palestine, forms the chief attraction. The words of this Oratorio were written by the Rev. R. HEBER, and formed a prize Poem at Oxford. The Music, which has only been performed twice, (some years ago, in the Opera Concert Room) is said to be very fine. An opportunity of comparing an almost new English Composition, with that of the celebrated Italian Master, ROSSINI, whose music has of late occupied so much attention, is thus afforded us. Another splendid audience is expected.

———

This evening will be performed, a Grand Selection of

Antient and Modern Music,

Under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA,

A New and Splendid ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated

By Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

PART I.

A Grand Selection.

Chorus—When his loud voice . . . . . . . . (Jephthah) . . . . . . . . Handel
Air, Miss Stephens—Pious orgies……(Judas Maccabaeus)… Handel.  
Recit. ed Aria, Mr Sapio—Softly Sweet in Lydian measures—Violon-     cello, Obligato, Mr. Brooks,……..(Alexander’s Feast)……Handel
Recit. and Air, Mrs. Salmon—So shall the lute and harp awake—     Accompanied on the Harp and Organ by Mr Bochsa and Sir George     Smart…………………………………….(Judas Macc.)……Handel
Scena ed Aria, Mr Braham—Superbo di metesco,        (Composed ex-     pressly for these Performances)……………………Pio Cianchettini.
Air, Miss Goodall, and Trio with Mr Terrail and Mr Nelson,     and     Chorus—Sound the loud timbrel        (From Moore’s sacred Songs,     newly arranged with orchestral accompaniment)
Air, Miss M. Tree—What though I trace…(Solomon). . . . . . . Handel    
Luther’s Hymn, (by express desire)—Mr Braham

Between the First and Second Parts,

Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton—‘Tu ch’ accendi’—Rossini

The Emperor Alexander’s favourite March, with Va-

riations for the Grand Piano Forte,

Mr. MOSCHELES.

(His last appearance here)

PART II AND III

(First Time at these Performances)

PALESTINE

A SACRED ORATORIO,

In Two Parts,

The Words from a Prize Poem by the Rev. R. HEBER—set to Music

By WILLIAM CROTCH, Mus. Doc.

PART FIRST

OVERTURE.

Solo, Mr Terrail, and Chorus—Reft of thy sons.

Recit. Mr Kellner—Is this thy place

Air—Ye guardian saints.—Harp Obligato, Mr Bochsa.

                            Chorus –O happy once

Air, Mr Sapio, and Chorus—But now thy sons

Air, Miss Paton—O thou their guide

                            Chorus—O feeble boast

                            Chorus—Let Sinai tell

Recit. Mr Nelson—But who shall dare.

Air, Awe struck I cease

Recit. Miss M. Tree—Such were the cares

Air, Triumphant race

Recit. Mr Braham—And he the Royal Sage

Air—To him were known

                            Chorus—Hence all his might

Air, Miss Goodall—Yet e’en the works

Air, and Semi-Chorus—In frantic converse

Duet, Miss Paton and Mr Braham—Such the faint echo

Air, Mr Kellner—For thee his iv’ry load

Recit. accompanied, Mr Nelson—No workman steel

Air and Chorus—Then the harp awoke

PART SECOND.

Air, Mr Sapio—Did Israel shrink?

Air, Miss Povey—E’en they who dragged—Harp Obligato, Mr. Bochsa

                            Chorus—Nor vain their hope

Quartet. Miss Goodall, Miss M. Tree, Mr Braham, and Mr Kellner—

         Lo ! stan-led Chiefs

                            Chorus—Daughter of Sion

                            Chorus—He comes.

Quartet, Miss Povey, Mr Terrail, Mr Sapio, and Mr Nelson—Be

         peace on earth.

Recit. Mr Kellner—Thou palsied earth

Air and Chorus—Are these his limbs?

Air, Miss M. Tree—Ye faithful few

Air, Mr Braham—Vengeance, thy fiery wing

Recit. acc. Mr Kellner—Yet heavier far

Air—Ah ! fruitful now no more.

Quartet, Miss Goodall, Mr Terrail, Mr Braham, and Mr Nelson,

         and Chorus—Then on your tops

Air, Mrs Salmon—No more your thirsty rocks

Air, Mr Nelson—But who is he?

Sestet, Mrs Salmon, Miss Paton, Mr Terrail, Mr Braham, Mr Sapio,

         And Mr Kellner—Lo ! Cherub Bands.

Recit. accompanied, Mrs Salmon—And Shall not Israel’s sons

Solo, Mrs Salmon, and Chorus—Hark! white-robed crowds

Chorus—Worthy the Lamb. Hallelujah. Amen.

—————————

Principal Vocal Performers.

Mrs SALMON, Miss GOODALL,

Miss M. TREE,

Miss STEPHENS, Miss POVEY, and Miss PATON,

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. SAPIO, Mr. NELSON,

Mr. TERRAIL, Master LONGHURST, and

Mr. KELLNER,

Grand Piano Forte, Mr. MOSCHELLES,

Harp, Mr. BOCHSA.

————

The Band will be numerous, and Complete in every Department.

Leader, Mr. Smart.

SIR GEORGE SMART.

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by

Mr.GRAY

The Performers in the Chorusses [sic], under the Superintendance [sic] of Mr WATSON, will be numerous, and assisted by the Young Gentlemen of His Majesty’s Chapel Royal, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and Westminster Abbey.

The Morning Chronicle (March 5, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.

—THIS EVENING, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.—Part I. A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the First and Second Parts, Scena and Aria, Miss Paton, “Tu ch’ accendi;” Fantasia and grand Variations on the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, his last appearance at these Performances.—Parts II and III. (first time at these Performances) PALESTINE, a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose Permission this Work will be performed).—Full particulars are given in the small bills.—Principal Vocal Performers: Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart; Leader, Mr. H. Smart.—

It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed, by particular desire, on Friday next, being the only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

The Morning Post (March 5, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE, THIS EVENING, March 5, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA. Part I. A SELECTION from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the first and second Parts, Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton—Tu ch’ accendi; Fantasia and grand Variations on the Piano-forte, Mr. Moscheles, his last appearance at these Performances.—Parts II and III. (first time at these Performances), PALESTINE. a Sacred Oratorio in Two Parts; the Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber, set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose permission this Work will be performed.) Full Particulars are given in the small Bills.—Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart; Leader, Mr. H. Smart.—It is respectfully announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE MESSIAH, with the additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed, by particular desire, on Friday next, the 7th  Instant. being the only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present Season.

The Times (March 5, 1823): 4.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL DRURY-LANE.

THIS EVENING, March 5, a grand PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the direction of Mr. BOCHSA. Part I. A Selection from the Works of eminent Composers. Between the first and second parts, Scena ed Aria, Miss Paton; “Tu ch’ accendi”; Fantasia and. Grand Variations on the Pianoforte, Mr. Moscheles, his last appearance at these performances. Part II and III. (first time at these performances), PALESTINE, a Sacred Oratorio, in two parts; Words selected from a Prize Poem, by the Rev. R. Heber; set to Music by W. Crotch, Mus. Doc. (by whose permission this work will be performed). Full particulars are given in the small bills. Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, and Miss Paton; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Master Longhurst, Mr. Nelson, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart. Leader, Mr. Smart. It is respectfully. Announced, that the whole of Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, The Messiah, with the additional Accompaniments by Mozart, will be performed, by particular desire, on Friday next, the 7th instant, being the. Only time this Oratorio can be performed during the present season.

The Literary Gazette; and Journal of Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences, &c. (March 8): 157.

ORATORIOS.—On Wednesday, after an admirable Miscellaneous Selection, principally from Handel, and a beautiful original Scena ed Aria (for Braham) by Cianchettini, Dr. Crotch’s grand sacred Oratorio of Palestine was performed. This learned and able composition was produced eight or ten years ago, and was generally considered to be one of the most elaborate and skilful works of the English School of Music; and still does it merit that character, though we are compelled to say it appeared too long and too complicated (if not, towards the close, too feeble,) for a popular anditory [sic]. Many of the parts are delightful, and the whole is in a high style of art; but after all, the English are essentially not a musica. Nation, and we observed that time began to hang heavy on many heads before this fine Oratorio could be brought to a close, indeed as a punning friend of ours, whose tongue is more apt than his ear, replied to an amateur’s assertion, that Palestine was both elevating and moving—:It proves to be so, for it raises people from their seats, and moves them off.” In despite of so witless a jest, however, the piece was greatly applauded, and its merits will no doubt draw another bumper House next Wednesday.

Reviews

The Morning Post (March 6, 1823): 3.

ORATORIO.—The performances at Drury Lane last night afforded a high treat to a very numerous audience; but we have at present no room for particulars.

The Theatrical Observer (March 6, 1823): 1-2.

DRURY-LANE.

THIS Theatre was last night attended by a crowded and fashionable audience, and, perhaps, as discerning as any that ever graced a Theatre. Although there was an excellent and well chosen selection for the first act, supported by the eminent talents of Mrs. SALMON, Miss STEPHENS, Miss M. TREE, Madame CAMPORESE, Mr. BRAHAM, Mr. SAPIO, and Mr. MOSCHELLES’ performance on the Grand Piano-Forte, the chief attraction was Dr. CROTCH’S Oratorio of Palestine, which was performed by his permission, for the third time in London. It very naturally brought the majority of musical professors, and the admirers of English composition to the theatre. Persons connected with the musical world, may be aware, but the public, generally, cannot form an idea of the interest which its announcement created; the worthy doctor having treasured it up with great tare, and refused to have it performed during the last twelve years, until this occasion. As a composition, Palestine ranks high many of the airs and choruses [sic] are of the finest description, and were admirably performed, with some slight exceptions in the First Part; indeed, we think the Second Part was the most uniformly striking both in composition and execution. The quartet of Lo! star-led Chiefs, and chorus, was very beautiful. Mr. KELLNER’s two pieces of Thou palsied earth, and Yet heavier far, were much admired. Mrs. SALMON’S air of No more your thirsty rocks, was loudly encored. Mr. BOCHSA accompanied two of the airs on the Harp, with fine taste and execution, and they met with deserved applause. The concluding chorus was extremely grand. The whole of the Oratorio went off well, and not without deserving the applause bestowed upon it. If we offer an opinion upon it as a whole, we should say that it was sufficient to have given one delightful act. The performers exerted themselves to the utmost, and were much cheered.

We are sorry iq say that Miss PATON could not appear in consequence of indisposition. This was particularly unfortunate, as she was to have taken a considerable share in Palestine.

We are, however, rather astonished, that with so numerous a company of female singers, Mr. BOCHSA could not have found a substitute for Miss PATON, without giving the music to Miss TREE and Miss GOODALL, who had already parts in the piece. Where was Miss FORDE ?—who was, be it remembered, announced as one of the company at the beginning of the season. Mr. BOCHSA deserves much praise, but be must listen a little to the public. No singer has been more applauded than Miss FORDE, although hitherto put in the bills at the end of the third act, when all were tired—perhaps Mr. B. will favour us with a reason.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (April 1823): 59.

….On the succeeding Friday, The Lady of the Lake was produced, but without Miss Tree. The parts were given to Mrs. Salmon, Miss Paton, Messrs. Braham, Sapio, and Kellner, who did their utmost to give them effect. But these adaptations are mongrel things, which rarely convey the composer’s meaning with any truth, and in the present instance, the words are so extremely ill-fitted to the music, that it seems in a perpetual struggle to throw its companion off. The whole had been very insufficiently rehearsed, particularly the choruses [sic], so that altogether it was coldly received by the judging part of the audience. In the course of this same evening, Μadame Camporese, in “Tu che accendi,” and Mr. Braham in “He was eyes unto the blind,” shewed the perfection of the Italian and English schools of singing. M. Moschelles also exhibited his great powers, in a concerto on the piano-forte; and Miss Stephens sung enchantingly the beautiful Irish melody, “Savourna delish.” The length of this performance has been, with great reason, complained of ; [sic] for beginning at seven, it was not over till between twelve and one o’clock.

The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, vol. 9, (April 1, 1823): 153-154.

ORATORIOS.—These musical performances have been continued twice a-week, in regular succession, at Drury Lane during the whole of the past month, under the direction of Mr. Bochsa, whose exertions have been strenuous, and praiseworthy, both in producing a very great variety of new music, mixed with older compositions of established merit, and in engaging nearly the whole of the first-rate vocal talent in the metropolis, and appointing a complete and competent instrumental orchestra. Besides “Cyrus in Babylon,” noticed in our account of last month, the principal pieces of extent were,— “The Lady of the Lake”—Dr. Crotch’s Oratorio of “Palestine”—“The Creation”—“The Redemption”—Mozart’s “Requiem”—“Acis and Galatea”—“The Messiah;”—and there were a number of classic compositions, of minor extent, by a variety of great masters. As we have given our opinion of Rossini’s “Donna del Lago” in the preceding article, it is unnecessary to enter into a particular account of “The Lady of the Lake,” as performed at the Oratorios. The English text of Sir W. Scott forced under Rossini’s music, and the English singers, by whom the latter was executed, gave but a faint glimpse of the nature of the work. Proper emphasis and accentuation were wanting. Some individuals, whom we will not name, caring little for Rossini’s time, dragged on the notes ad libitum, made gratuitous pauses, cadences, &c., as if they were singing English ballads, and altogether seemed quite out of their element. One lady, in particular, appeared quite abroad, and under constant suffering, from the correct time in the accompaniments. The choruses, however, told, upon the whole, much better than at the King’s Theatre, because the singers were not only more numerous, but decidedly superior. Dr. Crotch’s “Palestine” would be infinitely more interesting if it were only half as long. Its duration wearies the ear and spirits. A selection from it would have been preferable at the Oratorios. It is a scientific, skilful, and meritorious com position; a mixture of old and modern style. Two or three of the melodies are particularly good; but, upon the whole, the Oratorio is not so much distinguished by novelty and sweetness of musical ideas, as by the richness of its harmony. Many of the harmonic combinations are of the first order, others produce a grand and striking effect; the accompaniments possess the utmost variety, and some are peculiarly elegant. The singers and orchestra exerted themselves laudably to do justice to the composition. Among the numerous solo-players on various instruments, the performances of Mr. Moscheles on the piano-forte created the greatest interest. His execution certainly baffles all description: it is beyond what we conceived the piano-forte capable of, until we heard him the winter before last. His play, no doubt, will give a new impulse to our own artists. As a composer, too, we consider Mr. M. to hold an eminent rank. His ideas are as original, vivid, and tasteful, as his play. The Oratorios have invariably been crowded at every performance, by audiences the most respectable; so that Mr. Bochsa is likely to be amply rewarded for his unremitting efforts to satisfy the expectations of the musical public.

The Quarterly Musical Magazine and Review, vol.V, (1823): 260-261.

….

With respect to performers and selections, there was an obvious conciliation of national esteem, by the predominance of English singers and English music. As M. BOCHSA is situated, and in the state of opinion, this was certainly no less judicious. There was also a more marked attention to propriety in the arrangement of the pieces than was observable in the incongruous admixture of sacred and profane, upon which we some time since thought it right to remark with the asperity it deserved. The great novelties of the Season were—

Cyrus in Babylon,

The Lady of the Lake—both by Rossini, but translated into English,

And Palestine, by Dr. Crotch.

The list of singers included almost all the native names of eminence, with the exception of MR. VAUGHAN—MADAME CAMPORESE, MADAME BULGAR1, and SIGNOR CURIONI, being almost the only Italians engaged. MR. MOSCHELES, the great pianist, played concertos. MADAME BULGARI failed, and as a singer has indeed but slight claims to notice in the present state of the art. Thus then the principal fact appears to be, the effect of opinion in bringing about the partial restoration of English music and English performers, together with the care displayed in the separation of the grave and lighter parts of the performances. These improvements argue a conviction not only of the moral necessity, but that such a deference was actually demanded by the state of public sentiment. Still however the proprietor is no gainer. To what is this attributable: We reply, without hesitation, to the enormous expences [sic] entailed by the extravagant engagements of singers, and by the variety and numbers employed. This comes of the rage for excess. The public have been taught to believe that they must not only hear the finest talent, but all the talent in the country at once. Hence concerts protracted to such a length that the audience departs supersaturated with music, and fatigued to the extremity of wearisomeness by long sitting and overworn attention. Hence too the indisposition to repeat an amusement so richly but at the same time so irksomely excessive. These objections are the acknowledged ruin of public music, but still they are not corrected, because any bill of fare, which promises a degree of enjoyment so moderate that the mind could easily entertain and luxuriate in all the contents, would now be thought bare and meagre, excite no wonderment, and therefore little attendance. But some new means must be devised, for the present plan, it is clear by the results, is exhausted. We are inclined to think absolute cessation for a time would be most likely to restore the palled and languid appetite of the public.

26 February 1823

Oratorio Concert/A Grand Performance of Ancient and Modern Music

London: Theatre Royal, Drury Lane

Time: Evening, Seven o’Clock

Tickets: Boxes 7s., Pit 3s. 6d., Lower Gallery 2s., Upper Gallery 1s., Second Price at 9.

 

Programme

Part I    
A Grand Selection
Overture, Esther Handel
‘Hymn of Eve’Miss StephensArne
From Samson: Air, ‘Honor and arms’Mr. KellnerHandel
From Judas Maccabæus  
Air, ‘From mighty Kings’
Trio, ‘Disdainful of danger
 
Mrs. Salmon
Messrs. Kellner, Pyne, Terrail, Chorus
Handel
From Jephtha: Recit. and Air, ‘Farewell ye limpid streams’Miss TreeHandel
From Judas Maccabæus: Duet, ‘O lovely peace’Miss Cubitt, Miss LoveHandel
‘Luther’s Hymn’Mr. Braham 
From The Mount of Olives
Recit. and Trio, ‘O children of our Father’
‘Hallelujah! to the Father’
Miss Goodall, Messrs. Braham, Nelson
Chorus
Beethoven
Scene and Aria, ‘Ciel clemente’Mme BulgariMorlacchi
Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘We are a’ noddin’  Mr. Moscheles 
*From Abel: Song, ‘How cheerful along he gay mead’Miss StephensArne
*Recit and Air, ‘Auld Robin Grey’Miss StephensRev. W. Leeves
*Duet, ‘I love thee’Miss Stephens, Mr. Braham 
*From Samson: Air, ‘Let the bright Seraphin’Miss StephensHandel
Part II    
A Selection from Rossini’s Oratorio Cyrus in Babylon
(second time in the country)
Overture  
Introduction and Air, ‘The Babylonias rejoicing for
their victory over the Persians’
Mrs. Salmon, Mr. Braham 
Air, ‘Cyrus’s sorrow for his fate, and exhortation to
his companions to revenge him’
Miss M. Tree, Chorus 
Trio, ‘The interview of Cyrus and Amira discovered
by Belshazzar’
Mrs. Salmon, Miss Tree, Mr. Braham 
Air, ‘Belshazzar in consternation, demands from the
sages an interpretation of the hand-writing on the wail’
Mr. Braham, Chorus 
Recit. and Air, ‘Daniel denounces the wrath of
heaven Belshazzar’
Mr. Pyne 
Air, ‘Amira’s lamentation at the approaching
death of Cyrus and her son’ 
Mrs. Salmon;
Violin Obbligato: Mr. Mori
 
Finale, ‘The deliverance of Cyrus’Miss M. Tree, Mrs. Salmon, Mr. Nelson, Chorus 
Horn Fantasia, incl. ‘Rule Britannia’Signor Puzzi 
Part III  
A Grand Miscellaneous Act  
The Calm of the Sea and the Rising Breeze. A descriptive Chorus by Beethoven translated and adapted from 
German from Goethe’s Poem (fourth time in the country)
Soloists: Miss Povey, Master Longhurst, Messrs. Nelson, Terrail 
Air, ‘O say not woman’s love is bought’Miss TreeWhitaker
From Judas Maccabæus: Recit. and Air, ‘Sound an alarm’Mr. BrahamHandel
From Judas Maccabæus: ‘We hear, we hear’  ChorusHandel
From La donna del Lago: Cavatina, ‘Oh! quante lagrime’Mme VestrisRossini
Recit. and Air, ‘Tritler, forbear’Miss FordeBishop
From Davide: Recit. and Rondo, ‘Saziati Ingrata’  Mr. KellnerZiagaretti
Trio, ‘Blithe are the bowers of Mosley’Miss Love, Miss Forde, Miss PoveyKelly
Grand Chorus and SoloMr. Terrail, ChorusHandel
Principal Vocalists: Mesdames Bulgari, Vestris, Miss Cubitt, Miss Forde, Miss Love, Miss M. Tree, Miss Povey, Mrs. Salmon, Miss Stephens; Master Longhurst, Messrs. Braham, Kellner, Nelson, Pyne, Terrail  
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Mori, Moscheles, Signor Puzzi
Leader: Leader, Mr. Henry Smart; Conductor: Sir George Smart  

———————————

Encores: Recit and Air, ‘Auld Robin Grey’—Miss Stephens—Rev. W. Leeves

Duet, ‘I love thee’—Miss Stephens

Air, ‘Let the bright Seraphin’—Miss Stephens, Mr. Braham


Advertisements

Playbill (February 21, 1823)

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE

———————————

The Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, are respectfully informed, that a GRAND PERFORMANCE of

ANTIENT AND MODERN MUSIC,

Will take place at the above Theatre,

THIS EVENING, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26th, 1823,

Under the Direction of

Mr. BOCHSA.

A NEW AND SUPERB ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated by Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

———————————

PART I.—A

GRAND SELECTION

Overture to Esther……………………………………………………….Handel.
Hymn of Eve, Miss STEPHENS………………………………………….Arne.
Air, Mr. KELLNER—Honour and arms………….(Samson.)……………Handel.
Recit. & Air, Mrs. SALMON—From mighty kings…(Judas Macc.)…….Handel.
Trio, Mr. TERRAIL, Mr. PYNE, and Mr. KELLNER, and Chorus— 
     Disdainful of danger……………….(Judas Macc.)……………………Handel.
Recit. & Air, Miss M. TREE—Farewell ye limpid streams..(Jephthah.)…Handel.
Duetto, Miss CUBITT & Miss LOVE—O lovely peace..(Judas Macc.)…Handel.
Luther’s Hymn, Mr. BRAHAM.
Recit. and Air, Miss POVEY—But thou didst not leave…………………..Handel.
FROM BEETHOVEN’s CELEBRATED SACRED ORATORIO,
THE MOUNT OF OLIVES:
Recit. and Trio, Miss GOODALL, Mr. BRAHAM, and Mr. NELSON—
     O children of our Father.
Grand Chorus—Hallelujah! to the Father!

Between the First and Second Parts,

Scena ed Aria, Madame BULGARI, (her Third Appearance in London)—Ciel clemente…….Morlacchi.              A FANTASIA EXTEMPORE ON THE GRAND PIANO FORTE,

MR. MOSCHELES,

In which will be introduced some favourite National Airs. (His Last Appearance but one at these Performances.)

PART II.

In consequence of the very great Applause on the 30th of January last, and on the 14th Instant, will be repeated (for the Third Time in this Country)

A SELECTION FROM ROSSINI’s SACRED ORATORIO,

CYPRUS IN BABYLON.

With English Words, translated and adapted from the original Italian.

Overture.
Introduction and Air, Mr. NELSON, and Chorus—
     The Babylonians rejoicing for their victory over the Persians.  
Recit. and Duet, Miss GOODALL and Mr, BRAHAM—
     Belshazzar’s menances to Amira, and her fidelity to Cyrus.
Chorus—and Air, Miss M. TREE—Cyrus’s sorrow for his fate, and exhortation
     to his companions to revenge him.
Trio, Miss GOODALL, Madame VESTRIS, and Mr. BRAHAM—
     The interview of Cyrus and Amira discovered by Belshazzar.
Air, Mr. BRAHAM, and Chorus—Belshazzar, in consternation, demands from
     the sages the interpretation of the hand-writing on the wall.
Recit. and Air, Mr. PYNE—Daniel denounces the wrath of heaven against
     Belshazzar.
Chorus—The attendants of Amira condole with her.
Recit. and Cavatina, Madame VESTRIS—Cyrus’s farewell with his son.
Finale, Miss POVEY, Miss M. TREE, and Mr. NELSON, and Chorus—
     The deliverance of Cyrus.

Between the Second and Third Parts.

A Fantasia on the Horn, Signor PUZZI, in which will be introduced the National Air, “Rule Britannia.”

PART III.

A Grand Miscellaneous Act.

Which will commence with (for the Fourth Time in this Country), a descriptive Chorus composed by BEETHOVEN, entitled

THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE,

The Solo Parts, by Miss POVEY, Master LONGHURST, Mr. TERRAIL, and Mr. NELSON.

(This Piece is one of the latest productions of the above celebrated Composer.)

Air, Miss M. TREE—O say not woman’s love is bought……………Whitaker.
Recit. and Air, Mr. BRAHAM—Sound an alarm.…(Judas Macc.)…Handel.
Chorus—We hear, we hear………………………
Cavatina, Madame VESTRIS—Oh quante lagrime……………………..Rossini.
Recit. and Air, Miss FORDE—Trifler, forbear………………………….Bishop.
Recit. e Rondo, Mr. KELLNER—Saziati ingrata!…….(Davide.)……..Zingarelli.
Trio, Miss POVEY, Miss FORDE, and Miss LOVE—  
     Blithe are the bowers of Mosely…………………………………………Kelly.
Grand Chorus, and Solo, Mr. TERRAIL………(Athalia.)………………Handel.
Around let acclamations ring,
Bless the true Church and save the King.

PRINCIPAL VOCAL PERFORMERS.

Mrs. SALMONMiss STEPHENS,
Miss GOODALL,Miss CUBITT,
Miss FORDE,Miss POVEY,
ANDMiss LOVE,
AND
Miss M. TREE.Madame VESTRIS.

AND

Madame BULGARI

(Her Third Appearance in London.)

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. PYNE, Mr. TERRAIL,     Mr. NELSON,      Master Longhurst,

And

Mr. KELLNER,

(His Second Appearance at These Performances for these Two Years.)

The Band will be numerous, and complete in every Department. Leader, Mr. SMART.

SIR GEORGE SMART,

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by Mr. GRAY.

[GB-Lbl Playbills 56]

The Morning Chronicle (February 24, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.—On Wednesday Next, a Grand Performance of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. Bochsa.—Part I. A Selection from the Works of Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, &c. &c.- Between the First and Second Parts—Air, Mad. Bulgari; a Fantasie extempore on the Grand Piano-forte (in which will be introduced the favourite Air “We’re a’ Noddin), Mr. Moschelles.—Part II. (Third time in this country). A Selection from Rossini’s Sacred Oratorio Cyrus in Babylon; between the Second and Third Parts, a Fantasia on the Horn, Signor Puzzi. —Part III. A Grand Miscellaneous Act, the particulars of which will be announced. Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Miss Forde, Miss Cubitt, and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, Miss Love, Miss Paton, Madame Vestris, Mad. Bulgari. Mr Braham, Mr. Pyne, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Sapio; Mr. Kellner and Signor Curioni. Conductor, Sir George Smart; Leader, Mr. Smart.

Morning Advertiser (February 26, 1823): 2.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE

THIS EVENING, Feb 26, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

Part I. A SELECTION from the Works of Handel, Beethoven, &c. &c. Between the first and second Parts, Air, Madame Bulgari, Mortachi; a Fantasia § on the Grand Piano Forte (in which will be introduced, the favourite Air “We’re a’ noddin), Mr. Moscheles. (His last appearance but one.)

Part II.—(Third time in this country) a SELECTION from Rossini’s Sacred Oratorio, CYRUS IN BABYLON. Between the second and third Parts, a Fantasia on the Horn, Sig. Puzzi.

Part III.—A GRAND MISCELLANEOUS ACT, which will commence with (fifth time in this Country) THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE, a descriptive Chorus, composed by Beethoven. Further particulars are announced in the small bills.

Principal Vocal Performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Miss Forde, Miss Cubitt, and Miss M. Tree.—Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, Miss Love, and Madame Vestris, and Madame Bulgari.-Mr. Braham, Mr. Pyne, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart.— Leader, Mr. Smart.

On Friday next, the 28th, the Grand Performance of Antient and Modern Music will take place at the above Theatre, when will be repeated, (for the 2d time in this Country, “The Lady of the Lake,” by Rossini.

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser (February 26, 1823): 1.

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE

THIS EVENING, Feb 26th,

A GRAND PERFORMANCE OF ANCIENT AND

MODERN MUSIC,

under the direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

Part I.—A SELECTION from the Works of Handel. Beethoven, &c. Between the First and Second Parts, Air, Madame Bulgari, Mortachi; a Fantasia extempore on the Grand Piano Forte (in which will be introduced, the favourite Air ‘We’re a’ noddin) Mr. Moscheles, (his last appearance but one)

Part II.—(Third time in this country) a Selection from Rossini’s Sacred Oratorio, CYRUS IN BABYLON. Between the Second and Third Parts, a Fantasia on the Horn, Signor Puzzi.

Part III.—A GRAND MISCELLANEOUS ACT; which will commence with (5th time in this country) THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISNG BREEZE, a descriptive Chorus, composed by Beethoven. Further Particulars are announced in the small Bills.

Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Miss Forde, Miss Cubitt, and Miss M. Tree.—Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, Miss Love, and Madame Vestris, and Madame Bulgari.—Mr. Braham, Mr. Pyne, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart. Leader, Mr. Smart.

On Friday next, the 28th Instant. the Grand Performance of Antient and Modern Music will take place at the above Theatre, when will be repeated, (for the 2d time in this country, THE LADY OF THE LAKE, by Rossini.

The Morning Chronicle (February 26, 1823): 1.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.—THIS EVENING, a Grand Performance of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. Bochsa.—Part I. A SELECTION [*] from the Works of Handel, Beethoven, &c. &c. Between the First and Second Parts-Air, Mad. Bulgari; Mortachi; a Fantasie extempore on the Grand Piano-forte (in which will be introduced the favourite Air “We’re a’ Noddin”), M. Moschelles (his last appearance but one).—Part II. (Third time in this country). A Selection from Rossini’s Sacred Oratorio, CYRUS IN BABYLON. Between the Second and Third Parts, a Fantasia on the Horn, Signor Puzzi.—Part III. A GRAND MISCELLANEOUS ACT, which will commence with (fifth time in this country) THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE, a Descriptive Chorus, composed by Beethoven. Further particular are announced in the small bills.—Principal Vocal Performers. Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Miss Forde, Miss Cubitt and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, Miss Love, and Madame Vestris, and Madame Bulgari. Mr Braham, Mr. Pyne, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst and Mr. Kellner. Conductor, Sir George Smart; Leader, Mr. Smart.—On Friday next, the Grand Performance of Ancient and Modern Music will take place at the above Theatre, when will be repeated, for the second time in this country. The Lady of the Lake, by Rossini.

The Theatrical Observer (February 26, 1823): 2-4.

New Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

Oratorios.

The Selections of Music which Mr. BOCHSA has hitherto produced this season, have proved highly effective, particularly, as he has obtained by unprecedented exertions the assistance of the first vocal and instrumental Performers in this country. The crowded audiences that have been attracted on the previous nights, testify the sound policy of the arrangements that have thus brought into one focus such a host of musical talent. Another feast of Harmony is afforded this evening, which is expected to be most numerously attended; as it includes for the second time, the performance of the Selection from ROSSINI’S Cyrus in Babylon. Mr. MOSCHELLES, also, we see, is to display his astonishing execution on the Grand Piano Forte.

This Evening will be performed, a Grand Selection of

Antient and Modern Music,

Under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA,

A New and Splendid ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated

By Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

PART I.

A GRAND SELECTION.

Overture to Esther………………………………………….. Handel.
Hymn of Eve, Miss Stephens………………………..………. Arne.
Air, Mr Kellner—Honor and arms………………(Samson)  Handel.
Recit. and Air, Mrs Salmon—From mighty King  (Judas Mac,)  Han.
Trio, Mr Terrail. Mr Pyne, and Mr Kellner, and Chorus—Disdain-
       ful of danger…….…………………..(Judas Macc.) ……Handel
Recit, and Air, Miss Tree—Farewell ye limpid streams (Jepth.) Han.
Duetto, Miss Cubitt and Miss love-O lovely peace (Macc ) Handel.
Luther’s Hymn, Mr Braham
From Beethoven’s Celebrated Sacred Oratorio,
THE MOUNT OF OLIVES.
Recit. and Trio, Miss Goodall, Mr Braham, and Mr Nelson—O
         children of our Father.
Grand Chorus—Hallelujah! to the Father.

Between the First and Second Parts,

Scena ed Aria, Madame Bulgari, [3rd appearance,][1]

Ciel clemente . . . . . . Morlacchi

A Fantasia Extempore on the Grand Piano Forte,

Mr. Moschelles,

In which will be introduced the favorite Air “We’re a’noddin”

(His last appearance but one at these Performances)

PART II

(Second time in this Country) a Selection from Rossini’s Oratorio,

Cyrus in Babylon.

With English Words, translated and adapted from the Italian.

Overture.
Introduction and Air, Mr Nelson, and Chorus—The Babylonias re-     joicing for their victory over the Persians.
Recit. and Duet, Mrs Salmon, and Mr Braham—Belshazzar’s me-     naces to Amira, and her Fidelity to Cyrus.
Chorus and Air, Miss M. Tree,—Cyrus’s sorrow for his fate, and ex-     hortation to his companions to revenge him.
Trio, Mrs Salmon, Miss M. Tree, and Mr. Braham—The interview     of Cyrus and Amira discovered by Belshazzar.
Air and Chorus, Mr Braham—Belshazzar in consternation, demands     from the sages an interpretation of the hand-writing on the wail.
Recit. and Air, Mr Pyne—Daniel denounces the wrath of heaven     against Belshazzar.
Air, Mrs Salmon, with Violin Obligato. Mr. Mori—Amira’s lamen-     tation at the approaching death of Cyrus and her son.
Finale, Mrs Salmon, Miss M. Tree, and Mr Nelson, and Chorus—     The deliverance of Cyrus.

Between the Second and Third Parts,

A Fantasia on the Horn, Signor Puzzi, in which will

be introduced the National Air, “ Rule Britannia,”

PART III.

A GRAND

MISCELLANEOUS ACT.

Which will commence with,

(Fourth time in this country) a Descriptive Chorus, composed by

BEETHOVEN, translated and adapted from the original German of the

                        eminent Poet Goethe, entitled

The Calm of the Sea and the Rising Breeze ;

The Solo Parts by Miss Povey, Master Longhurst, Mr Terrail, and

Mr. Nelson.

  Air, Miss M. Tree—O say not woman’s love is bought……Whitaker
Recit. and Air, Mr Braham—Sound an alarm   Chorus—We hear, we hear…………………… (Judas Macc) Han.
  Cevetina [sic], Madame Vestris—O quante lagrime….…….….Rossini
  Recit. and Air, Miss Forde—Tritler, forbear……………..…….Bishop
  Recit. e Rondo, Mr. Keliner—Saziati Ingrata. . . . . . (Davide) Ziagaretti
  Trio, Miss Povey, Miss Forde, and Miss Love—Blithe are the bowers         Of Mosely…………………………………………………..Kelly
  Grand Chorus and Solo, Mr Terrail…………………………….Handel

Around let acclamations ring.

Bless the true Church and save the King.

Principal Vocal Performers

Mrs. SALMONMiss STEPHENS,
Miss POVEY,Miss CUBITT,
Miss FORDE, andMiss LOVE, and
Miss M. TREE,Madame VESTRIS,

Miss GOODALL,

Madame BULGARI, (her third appearance in this country)

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. PYNE, Mr. TERRAIL,

Mr. NELSON, Master Longhurst, and

Mr. KELLNER,

[His second appearance these two years.][2]

The Band will be numerous, and Complete in every Department.

Leader, Mr. Smart.

SIR GEORGE SMART,

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by

Mr. GRAY; and Mr. WATSON superintend the Chorusses [sic].

Playbill (February 25, 1823).

….

To-morrow, A Grand Selection of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, (under the firection of Mr. BOCHSA.) Including CYRUS in BABYLON, by ROSSINI; and a Fantasia Exmtempore [sic] on the Grand Piano Forte, by Mr. MOSCHELLES, his last appearance but one at these Performances.

[GB-Lbl Playbills 56]

The Times (February 25, 1823): 3.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL DRURY-LANE.

TO-MORROW EVENING, Feb. 26, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA. Part I.—A Selection from the works of Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, &c. Between the first and second parts, Air, Madame Bulgari, a Fantasia extempore on the Grand Pianoforte (in which will be introduced the favourite Air “We’re a’ noddin)”, Mr. Moscheles. Part II.—Third time in this country) a Selection from Rossini’s Sacred Oratorio, CYRUS IN BABYLON. Between the second and third parts, a Fantasia on the Horn, Signor Puzzi. Part III. A Grand Miscellaneous Act, the particulars of which will be duly announced. Principal Vocal Performers—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Miss Forde, Miss Cubitt, and Miss M. Tree; Miss Stephens, Miss Povey, Miss Love, and Miss Paton; Madame Vestris, and Madame Bulgaro; Mr. Braham, Mr. Pyne, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Sapio, Mr. Kellner and Signor Curioni. Conductor, Sir George Smart. Leader, Mr. Smart.


[1] Square brackets are not editorial.

[2] Square brackets are not editorial.

Air, ‘Let the bright Seraphin’—Miss Stephens, Mr. Braham

Reviews

The Morning Chronicle (February 27, 1823): 3.

ORATORIOS.—The Oratorio was last night performed at Drury-lane Theatre, to which house, it seems, these Concerts are to be confined, in consequence of the inauspicious circumstances which attended the first performance at Covent-garden. There was little of novelty in the selection of last night. The Lady of the Lake, which was but coldly received on Friday, was not repeated. In the first part, which consisted of selections from HANDEL, BEETHOVEN, and ARNE; Miss STEPHENS sang, “How cheerful along the gay mead,” with her accustomed sweetness; and Mrs. SALMON’S unrivalled powers of execution gave effect to the air, “From mighty Kings,” from Judas Maccabæus. These were the only airs allotted to those distinguished Vocalists during a protracted performance of nearly five hours. Mr. BRAHAM was encored in Luther’s Hymn, which he sang in a style of simple grandeur, the effect of which was unimpaired by any of those abrupt transitions or redundant ornaments in which he too frequently indulges. Madame BULGARI, who made her debut at Covent-garden Theatre, when the embarrassments inseparable from a first appearance must have been increased by the tumultuous state of the house, sang an aria, by MORLACCHI, with increased spirit and confidence, and was encored. A fantasia on the piano-forte was performed by Mr. MOSCHELLES, in which he introduced several popular airs. The style of this artist is distinguished by some striking peculiarities; its general characteristics are passion and expression, and he executes the most intricate passages with extraordinary rapidity, brilliancy, and precision.—The selection from ROSSINI’S Cyrus in Babylon was performed for the third time. The music of this drama, which contains little to remind us of the author of the Mosè in Egitto, was heard with languid indifference. The state of the house, which was but thinly attended, contributed to increase the general heaviness of this night’s performance.

The Theatrical Observer, vol 1, (February 27, 1823): 1-2.

DRURY-LANE.

Last night, another brilliant and crowded audience honored this Theatre, in consequence of the admirable Selection, which was given by Mr. BOCHSA for their entertainment. The first part consisted of pieces from HANDEL, FR. ARNE, and BEETHOVEN, and comprised several enchanting Airs by the chief vocalists. Miss STEPHENS, gave The Hymn of Eve, with exquisite tenderness and feeling, and was rapturously encored. Mrs SALMON was no less successful in the recitative and air, “From mighty kings,” and KELLNER sang “ Honor and arms,” with great effect. Luther’s Hymn, by BRAHAM, was as might

have been anticipated, a great effort, and appropriately applauded. MADAME BULGARI went through an air. (Ciel cemente) with succees [sic], and appears an improving singer. MOSCHELLES, performed a Fantasia extempore on the Grand Piano, with a brilliance, rapidity, and delicacy, assuredly never surpassed, and introduced several of the most popular airs, with the most delightful and enchanting sweetness.

Cyrus in Babylon was repeated for the third time, with good effect, although several airs were omitted. Signer PUZZI again astonished the audience, with a Fantasia on the Horn, surpassing some of his former efforts.

The Miscellaneous Act was well selected, the whole performance abounded in variety and admirable talent. Miss FORDE sang Trifler forbear,” with a power and sweetness not often equalled, and, we think, it forms no part of Mr. BOCHSA’S admirable taste and judgment to place her on each night of her performance, so late in the evening’s entertainment, we can have no objection to the other young aspirants to musical fame being put forward, hut it is by no means, like the rest of the arrangements, to put the duet of Miss CUBITT and Miss LOVE, “ O lovely peace,” and the air of Miss POVEY’S, “ But thou dist not leave,” in the first act, and leave Miss FORDE’S first song off to an hour too late, for most persons to wait. If Mr. Bochsa has no higher opinion of Miss Forde’s talent then to act thus, we would recommend him not to avail himself of it at all; we trust he will take the hint. The Trio, by Miss is FORDE, POVEY, and LOVE, was well sung, but at too late an hour to be enjoyed. We never heard more applause than was bestowed at various times upon the performances, and we are happy to observe, that with the exception of what we have pointed out, these performances increase in novelty, excellence, and general attraction, as the season advances.

Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle (March 2, 1823): 421.

ORATORIOS.—In consequence of the Oratorios at Covent-garden having been so unproductive, or, perhaps, from some other cause between known to the Conductor than to the Public, that house has been closed, and Mr. Bochsa has determined on opening Drury-lane two nights in the week during the usual term of the performances, and as far as the experience of the past week may be considered a criterion, he will have no reason to regret his determination. The house was extremely well attended on both Wednesday and Friday, and the performance on the latter evening, in particular, went off with more than usual eclat. On Wednesday night the Oratorio consisted of Cyrus in Babylon and Selections from Handel, Arne, Beethoven, &c. &c. The principal weight of which was sustained, and at times most powerfully sustained, by the energies of Braham. Miss Stephens, Mrs. Salmon, Miss Goodall, Madame Bulgari, and other ladies of less conspicuous abilities, also did credit to their respective parts; and the nimble-fingered Moschelles performed a Fantasia with infinite skill on the piano-forte. On Friday Rossini’s Opera of The Lady of the Lake, and a Miscellaneous Selection from the works of various Composers constituted the evening’s performance. Miss Stephens gave Let the bright Seraphini, and Auld Robin Gray, in her best style, and was encored in each, as also in the duet I love thee, with Mr. Braham. A note having been received from Miss Paton’s father, announcing that Lady’s inability, from an increase of her hoarseness and sore throat, to sing that evening, Miss Goodall consented to take Miss P.’s part in The Lady of the Lake, in which, considering the shortness of the notice, she acquitted herself most successfully. In Fact, she did so through the whole of her arduous performances. We are glad to hear testimony to the rapid improvement which this young Lady is making in her professional acquirements.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (April 1823): 59.

THE ORATORIOS.

These performances terminated for the season on the 21st of March. The speculation, it is said, has not been very successful; for though good audiences have been collected,—only one theatre being open,—yet the expence [sic] of paying for both Drury Lane and Covent Garden, in order to keep one shut up, and the high prices given to the singers, have it is supposed, consumed all the receipts. Whether the scheme was productive or not, we are unable to pronounce,—but we will assert that such a monopoly should be discouraged; particularly in such hands.

The principal novelty at those oratorios since our last, was the performance of PALESTINE, by Dr. Crotch; the words are those of a prize poem, by the Rev. Reginald Heber, now Bishop of Calcutta. This oratorio, though too grave in its character, and too ancient in its style for many, is certainly a very fine composition. Some of the chorusses [sic] are sublime, and a quartett, “Lo! star-led chiefs,” secures every suffrage in its favour.

The other performances during the month, were Cyrus in Babylon, portions of the Requiem,—of the Messiah, the whole of the Creation, together with a variety of Ballads, Airs, &c. Cyrus is a mere common-place opera; as such it might have that “brilliant success,” which is said to attend all novelties in the present day. But somehow or other, these brilliantly successful novelties often die very suddenly, and are immediately forgotten. Such is the fate of Cyrus, as an oratorio; such its fate would be as an opera.

….

The remainder of these “entertainments for Lent” were made up, as we have before remarked, of miscellaneous ballads, duets, &c. Miss Stephens, on one occasion, introduced her favourite recitative and air, “Auld Robin Gray,” with the usual effect. Miss Paton sang more than once that eternal “Sawye my wee thing” of which she is so fond,—but although tolerated and even applauded, we recommend this young lady to seek the support of the orchestra in preference to the simple accompaniment of the piano, played by herself. Her “Tu che accendi” was good.

We have noticed, we believe, all that required mention in these performances. May we hope that however desirable the concentration of talent may be, a second theatre for its exhibition will be opened next season!

The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, vol. 9, (April 1, 1823): 153-154.

ORATORIOS.—These musical performances have been continued twice a-week, in regular succession, at Drury Lane during the whole of the past month, under the direction of Mr. Bochsa, whose exertions have been strenuous, and praiseworthy, both in producing a very great variety of new music, mixed with older compositions of established merit, and in engaging nearly the whole of the first-rate vocal talent in the metropolis, and appointing a complete and competent instrumental orchestra. Besides “Cyrus in Babylon,” noticed in our account of last month, the principal pieces of extent were,— “The Lady of the Lake”—Dr. Crotch’s Oratorio of “Palestine”—“The Creation”—“The Redemption”—Mozart’s “Requiem”—“Acis and Galatea”—“The Messiah;”—and there were a number of classic compositions, of minor extent, by a variety of great masters. As we have given our opinion of Rossini’s “Donna del Lago” in the preceding article, it is unnecessary to enter into a particular account of “The Lady of the Lake,” as performed at the Oratorios. The English text of Sir W. Scott forced under Rossini’s music, and the English singers, by whom the latter was executed, gave but a faint glimpse of the nature of the work. Proper emphasis and accentuation were wanting. Some individuals, whom we will not name, caring little for Rossini’s time, dragged on the notes ad libitum, made gratuitous pauses, cadences, &c., as if they were singing English ballads, and altogether seemed quite out of their element. One lady, in particular, appeared quite abroad, and under constant suffering, from the correct time in the accompaniments. The choruses, however, told, upon the whole, much better than at the King’s Theatre, because the singers were not only more numerous, but decidedly superior. Dr. Crotch’s “Palestine” would be infinitely more interesting if it were only half as long. Its duration wearies the ear and spirits. A selection from it would have been preferable at the Oratorios. It is a scientific, skilful, and meritorious com position; a mixture of old and modern style. Two or three of the melodies are particularly good; but, upon the whole, the Oratorio is not so much distinguished by novelty and sweetness of musical ideas, as by the richness of its harmony. Many of the harmonic combinations are of the first order, others produce a grand and striking effect; the accompaniments possess the utmost variety, and some are peculiarly elegant. The singers and orchestra exerted themselves laudably to do justice to the composition. Among the numerous solo-players on various instruments, the performances of Mr. Moscheles on the piano-forte created the greatest interest. His execution certainly baffles all description: it is beyond what we conceived the piano-forte capable of, until we heard him the winter before last. His play, no doubt, will give a new impulse to our own artists. As a composer, too, we consider Mr. M. to hold an eminent rank. His ideas are as original, vivid, and tasteful, as his play. The Oratorios have invariably been crowded at every performance, by audiences the most respectable; so that Mr. Bochsa is likely to be amply rewarded for his unremitting efforts to satisfy the expectations of the musical public.

21 February 1823

Oratorio Concert/A Grand Performance of Ancient and Modern Music

London: Theatre Royal, Drury Lane

Time: Evening, Seven o’Clock

Tickets: Boxes 7s., Pit 3s. 6d., Lower Gallery 2s., Upper Gallery 1s., Second Price at 9.

 

Programme

*Irish Air, ‘Savourness deelich’Miss Stephens 
*From Theodora: Recit. and Air, Angels ever bright and fair’Miss StephensHandel
Part I    
A Selection from the Sacred Oratorio, The RedemptionArranged by Dr. Arnold
Overture, Occasional Oratorio Handel
From Ezio: Recit. and Air, ‘He layeth the beams’Mr. KellnerHandel
From Theodora: Recit. and Air, ‘Angels, ever bright and fair’Miss StephensHandel
From Israel in Egypt: ‘He gave them hailstones’Double ChorusHandel
From Seracle
Air, ‘Lord! what is man’
Recit. and Air, ‘He was eyes unto the blind’  

Miss Povey
Mr. Braham
Purcell
From Judas Maccabæus  
Air, ‘Pious orgies’  
Recit. ‘Now the elders of Israel’
Miss Paton
Mr. Braham
Handel
From Saul: ‘Welcome, welcome, mighty King’Semi-ChorusHandel
From Saul: ‘David, his ten thousand slew’ChorusHandel
From Judas Maccabæus: March  
Air, ‘Lord, remember David’
Air, ‘Holy, holy, Lord God Almighty’

Mr. Sapio
Mrs. Salmon 
Handel
From Israel in Egypt
‘The Lord shall reign’
Recit., ‘For the host of Pharaoh’
‘Sin ye to the Lord’  
‘The horse and his rider’

Chorus
Mr. Braham
Miss Stephens
Double Chorus 
Handel
From Tancredi
Recit., ‘Tu che accendi questo core’
Aria, ‘Di tanti palpiti’
Mme CamporeseRossini
Piano Concerto [No.4 in E major]    
(first time of performance in London)[1]
Mr. Moscheles
(first appearance in London this season)  
 
Part II  
A Selection from The Lady of the Lake, from the poem by Sir Bart Walter Scott arranged to Rossini’s La Donna del Lago
Introduction and Chorus (The Chase):
‘The Stag at Eve had drunk is fill’
Chorus 
Air, ‘Ellen’: The waves of slow retiring day’Miss Paton 
Duet, ‘Ellen and Fitz James’ (The Meeting): ‘What beauty and what grace’Miss Paton, Mr Sapio 
‘Huntsman rest’ thy chase is done’(The Highland Welcome)  Chorus 
Duet, ‘Ellen and Fitz James’ (The Departure):
‘And have we met so soon to part’
Mrs. Salmon, Mr. Braham 
Recit. and Air, ‘Malcolm Graem’ (Absence):
‘Oh! what is life when we doomed to prove’  
Mme Vestris 
Recit. and Air, ‘Douglas’ (The Return):
‘I met young Malcolm as I stray’d’
Mr. Kellner (first appearance for the two years) 
Recit. and Duet, ‘Ellen and Malcolm Graem’(The Parting):
‘Oh! Risk not thus thy Life for me’
Mrs. Salmon, Mme Vestris 
Air, ‘Rhoderick Dhu and Clansmen’(The Offer):
‘Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances’
Mr. Braham and Chorus 
Air, ‘Fitz James’ (The Stranger returned):
‘How sweet is toil endured for those’
Mr. Sapio 
Trio, ‘Ellen, Fitz James, and Allan’ (The Discovery):
‘Oh, stranger! in this hour of fear’  
Mrs. Salmon, Messrs. Braham and Sapio 
Air, ‘Malcolm Graem’ (The Disconsolate Lover):
‘My bosom night or day’
Mme Vestris, Chorus 
Recit. and Air, (Stirling Palace): ‘I did not think that my fond breast’Mrs. Salmon, Chorus 
Song, ‘O the moment was sad’Miss Stephens 
Violin Concerto, incl.  Le petit TambourMr. Mori 
Part III    
A Grand Miscellaneous Act   
The Calm of the Sea and the Rising Breeze (third time in the country). A descriptive Chorus by Beethoven translated and adapted from German from Goethe’s PoemSoloists: Miss Povey, Master Longhurst, Messrs. Nelson and Terrail 
From Comus: Duet, ‘The Echo’Mrs. Salmon, Miss StephensArne
Air, ‘Is there a heart’Mrs. BrahamBraham
Air, ‘Genius of Freedom’Miss PatonParry
Aria, ‘Qual mi circonda’Madame Bulgari (second public appearance in the country)Pavesi
Duet, ‘Ah si de’ mali miei’Mme Vestris, Mr. SapioRossini
From The Messiah: ‘Hallelujah!’ChorusHandel
Principal Vocalists: Mesdames Bulgari, Vestris, Mrs. Salmon, Miss Paton, Miss Povey, Miss Stephens, Signora Camporese; Master Longhurst, Messrs. Braham, Kellner, Nelson, Sapio, Terrail  
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Mori, Moscheles
Leader: Mr. Henry Smart; Conductor: Sir George Smart

———————————

Encores: Irish Air, ‘Savourness deelich’—Miss Stephens

Song, ‘O the moment was sad’—Miss Stephens


Moscheles: I was at a so-called Oratorio Concert; one part consisted of sacred, another of secular music. The public may have found the former part rather longer than they liked, for the people stormed and stamped because certain pieces of the Donna del Lago, which had been promised in the programme, were left out. [RMM, 49.]

Moscheles: Das Publikum…setzt mag diesmal guter Laune gewesen sein, da man ihm nicht nur die neulich weggelassenen Stücke aus der „Donna del lago” auftischte, sondern sämmtliche Nummern der Oper. [AML I, 72.]

[1] The concerto performed was probably the same concerto performed in Bath on February 11, and it seems that it may have been the Piano Concerto No.4 in E major.

Advertisements

Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser (January 24, 1823): 2.

The admirers of Sacred Harmony are impatient for the arrival of the Oratorio Season. These grand performances are to be again under the able management of Mr. Bochsa, whose talents gave such general satisfaction during the last winter; and we understand he is to be supported not only by the same able performers as on that occasion, but by a strong reinforcement of both native and foreign talents: among others, by Mr. Braham, for the first time these two years; Signor Curioni, Mrs. Austin, and Miss Paton; and an engagement we learn is also pending with Mons. Moschelles of whom fake speaks highly, and whose arrival in this country is daily expected. A new super Orchestra, decorated by Marinelli, is also erecting for the occasion. As a specimen of what is to follow, a grand Concert is to be given on Thursday next, to consist of a selection from Handel’s Messiah, with Mozart’s Accompaniment; an Oratorio, by Rossini, called “Cyrus in Babylon,” first time in this country; and a grand Miscellaneous Act, of which particulars will be timely given.

The Morning Post (February 20, 1823): 3.

We understand that Mr. BOCHSA has engaged the celebrated MOSCHELLES for the Oratorios, and that he will appear to-morrow evening for the first time this season, at Drury-lane Theatre. His performance on the Grand Piano will prove a great attraction.

Morning Advertiser (February 21, 1823): 2.

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE

THIS EVENING, Feb 21, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

Part I.—(For this Night only) a Selection from Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE REDEMPTION. Between the First and Second Parts, Recit. Ed Aria, Madame Camporese—O patria—Concerto Grand Piano Forte, Mr. Moscheles

Part II.—For the First Time in this Country, THE LADY OF THE LAKE, selected from a celebrated Poem of that name, written by Sir Walter Scott, Bart. And Arranged to Rossini’s admired Opera of La Donna del Lago.—Between the Second and Third Parts, Concerto on the Violin, Mr. Mori.

Part III.—A GRAND MISCELLANEOUS ACT, which will commence with (for the third time in this country) Beethoven’s Descriptive Chorus, translated and adapted from the original German of the eminent Poet-Goethe, entitled The CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE (this Piece is one of the latest productions of the above celebrated composer.)

Principal Vocal Performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Povey, and Madame Vestris—Miss Stevens, Miss Cubitt, and Miss Paton- Madame Camporese and Madame Blugari (her second public appearance in this country).—Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Kellner (his first appearance for these two years).—Leader, Mr. Smart. At the Organ, Sir George Smart.

Playbill (February 21, 1823)

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY LANE

———————————

The Nobility, Gentry, and the Public, are respectfully informed, that a GRAND PERFORMANCE of

ANTIENT AND MODERN MUSIC,

Will take place at the above Theatre,

THIS EVENING, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1823,

Under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA.

A NEW AND SUPERB ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated by Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

PART I.—A SELECTION FROM THE SACRED ORATORIO,

THE REDEMPTION.

The Pieces in which are from

THE OCCASIONAL ORATORIO, THEODORA, ISRAEL IN EGYPT; SEMELE, SAUL,

AND JUDAS MACCABAEUS.

The Selection forming this Oratorio, was arranged by the late Dr. ARNOLD, from the favourite Works by HANDEL, and performed at his Commemoration in WESTMINSTER ABBEY.

Overture to the Occasional Oratorio.
Recit. and Air, Mr. KELLNER—He layeth the beams.
Recit. and Air, Miss STEPHENS—Angels, ever bright and fair…(Theodora.)
Grand Double Chorus—He gave them hailstones…………..(Israel in Egypt.)
Air, Miss POVEY—Lord! What is man…………………………….(Semele.)
Recit and Air, Mr. BRAHAM—He was eyes unto the blind.
Air, Miss PATON—Pious orgies………………………………(Judas Mace.)
Recit. Mr. BRAHAM—Now the Elders of Israel.
Semi-Chorus—Welcome, mighty King….……………………………(Saul.)
Full Chorus—David his ten thousand slew [Saul.]
MARCH IN JUDAS MACCABÆUS.
Air, Mr. SAPIO—Lord, remember David.
Air, Mrs. SALMON—Holy, holy, Lord God Almighty
Chorus—The Lord shall reign……………………[Israel in Egypt.]
Recit. Mr. BRAHAM—For the host of Pharaoh………………(Israel in Egypt.)
Solo, Miss STEPHENS—Sing ye to the Lord……[Israel in Egypt.]
Grand Double Chorus—The horse and his rider….[Israel in Egypt.]

Between the First and Second Parts,

Aria, Madame CAMPORESE—Di tanti palpiti………(Il Tancredi.)……….Rossini.

A Concerto, Grand Piano Forte, (never performed in London) Mr. MOSCHELES………. Moscheles.

PART II. (FOR THE FIRST TIME IN THIS COUNTRY.)

THE LADY OF THE LAKE.

The Words selected from the celebrated Poem of that Name, written by SIR WALTER SCOTT, Bart, and arranged to ROSSINI’s admired Opera of

LA DONNA DEL LAGO.

Introduction and Chorus—(The CHASE)—The Stag at Eve had drunk his fill.  
Air, Miss PATON—Ellen—(EVENING)—The Waves of slow retiring Day.
Duet. Miss PATON and Mr. SAPIO—Ellen and Fitz James—(The MEETING)—
     What beauty and what grace.
Chorus—(The HIGHLAND AND WELCOME)—Huntsman rest, thy Chace is done.
Duet, Mrs. SALMON, and Mr. BRAHAM.—Ellen and Fitz James—(THE DEPART-
     TURE)—And have we met so soon to part.
Recit. and Air, Madame VESTRIS—Malcolm Graem—(ABSENCE)—Oh! what is Life
     when doomed to prove.
Recit. and Air, Mr. KELLNER—Douglas—(The RETURN)—I met young Malcolm as
     I stray’d.
Recit. and Duet. Mrs. SALMON and Madame VESTRIS—Ellen and Malcolm Graem
     —(The PARTING)—Oh! Risk not thus thy Life for me.
Air, Mr. BRAHAM, and Chorus.—Roderick Dhu and Clansmen—(THE OFFER.)—
    Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances.
Air, Mr. SAPIO—Fitz James—(The STRANGER RETURNED)—How sweet is toil
     endured for those.
Trio, Mrs. SALMON, Mr. BRAHAM, and Mr. SAPIO—Ellen, Fitz James, and
     Allan—(THE DISCOVERY)—Oh, Stranger! In this hour of fear.
Air and Chorus, Madame VESTRIS—Malcolm Graem—(The DISCONSOLATE LOVER)—
     my bosom night or day.
Recitative, and Air, Mrs. SALMON, and Chorus—(STIRLING PALACE.)—I did not think
     that my fond breast.

In this Piece an additional Orchestra of Wind Instruments will be employed.

Between the Second and Third Parts.

 Song, Miss STEPHENS—O the moment was sad. (Irish Melody).

A Concerto on the Violin, Mr, MORI, in which will be introduced the favourite Rondo, Le petit Tambour. Mayseder.

PART III.

A MISCELLANEOUS ACT.

Which will commence with (for the Third Time in this Country), a descriptive Chorus composed by BEETHOVEN, entitled

THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE,

The Solo Parts, by Miss POVEY, Master LONGHURST, Mr. TERRAIL, and Mr. NELSON.

(This Piece is one of the latest productions of the above celebrated Composer.)

Echo Song, Miss STEPHENS, and Mrs. SALMON…………………….Arne.
Air, Mr. BRAHAM—Is there a heart…………………………………..Braham.
Air, Miss PATON—Genius of Freedom………………………………….Parry.
Aria, Madame BULGARI—Qual mi circonda………………………….Pavesi.  
Duetto, Madame VESTRIS and Mr. SAPIO—Ah si di mali miei……..Rossini.
Grand Chorus—Hallelujah!…………………(Messiah.)……………………Handel.

PRINCIPAL VOCAL PERFORMERS.

Mrs. SALMONMiss STEPHENS,
Miss POVEY,AND
Madame VESTRIS.Miss PATON
 (Her Third Appearance at these Performances,)

Madame BULGARI

(Her second appearance in this Country.)

And Madame CAMPORESE

Mr. BRAHAM,

(His Fourth Appearance at these Performances for these Two Years,)

Mr. SAPIO,

Mr. TERRAIL,     Mr. NELSON,      Master Longhurst,

and    Mr. KELLNER,

(His First Appearance at These Performances for these Two Years.)

PRINCIPAL INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMERS

Piano Forte, Mr. MOSCHELLES, (His First Appearance in London This Season.)

Violin, Mr. MORI

The Band will be numerous, and Complete in every Department. Leader, Mr. SMART.

SIR GEORGE SMART,

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by Mr. GRAY.

 The Nobility, Gentry, and the Public in general, are most respectfully acquainted that

The Grand Performance of Antient and Modern Music, on Wednesday next, will

Take place at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

The Performers in the Choruses, under the Superintendence of Mr. WATSON, will be numerous, and assisted by the Young Gentlemen of

His Majesty’s Chapel Royal, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and Westminster Abbey.

Books of the Performance to be had in the Theatre only, Price 10d. Boxes, Places, & Tickets may be had of Mr. SPRING, at the Box Office, from 11 to 4.

Doors will be opened at half-past Six. The Performance will commence at Seven o’Clock.

The Public are most respectfully acquainted that Places in the dress Circle can only be secured by paying the Price of Admission when they are taken.

Boxes, 7s. Pit, 3s. 6d. Lower Gallery, 2s. Upper Gallery, 1s. Second Price at Nine.

[GB-Lbl Playbills 56]

The Morning Chronicle (February 21, 1823): 1.

THEATRE ROYAL, DRURY-LANE.—This EVENING, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANTIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA. Part I.—(for this Night only), a Selection from Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE REDEMPTION. Between the First and Second Parts, Recit. ed Aria, Madame Camporese—O patria—Concerto Grand Piano Forte, Mr. Moscheles. Part II.—For the First Time in this Country, THE LADY OF THE LAKE, selected from a celebrated Poem of that name, written by Sir Walter Scott, Bart, and arranged to Rossini’s admired Opera of LA DONNA DEL LAGO. Between the Second and Third Parts, Concerto on the Violin, Mr. Mori. Part III.—A GRAND MISCELLANEOUS ACT; which will commence with (for the Third Time in this Country) Beethoven’s Descriptive Chorus, translated and adapted from the original German of the eminent Poet Goethe, entitled THE CALM OF THE SEA AND THE RISING BREEZE (this Piece is one of the latest productions of the above celebrated Composer.)—Principal Vocal Performers.—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Povey, and Madame Vestris—Miss Stephens, Miss Cubitt, and Miss Paton-Madame Camporese and Madame Bulgari, her Second Public Appearance to this Country.—Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Kellner, his First Appearance for these Two Years. Leader, Mr. Smart. At the Organ, Sir George Smart.

The Theatrical Observer (February 21, 1823): 2-4.

New Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.

————

The ORATORIO of to-night presents another instance of a tasteful Selection. The Lady of the Lake will positively be performed; the music is said to be beautiful.

This Evening will be performed, a Grand Selection of

Antient and Modern Music,

Under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA,

A New and Splendid ORCHESTRA has been designed and decorated

By Mr. MARINARI, for these Performances.

PART I.

A Selection from the Sacred Oratorio,

The Redemption.

The pieces in which are from

The Occasional Oratorio, Theodora, Israel in Egypt,

Semele, Saul, and Judas Maccabæus. The Selection forming this Oratorio, was arranged by the late Dr. ARNOLD, from the favorite Works of HANDEL and performed at his Commemoration in WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Overture to the Occasional Oratorio
Recit. and Air. Mr. Kellner—He layeth the beams
Recit. and Air, Miss Stephens—Angels, ever bright and fair. (Theodora)
Grand Double Chorus—He gave them hailstones. . . . . . (Israel in Egypt)
Air, Miss Povey—Lord! what is man. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .(Seracle)
Recit, and Air, Mr Braham—He was eyes unto the blind.
Air, Miss Paton—Pious orgies . . . . .  . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .(Judas Macabæus)
Recit. Mr Braham—Now the elders of Israel
Semi-Chorus—Welcome, mighty king……
Full-Chorus—David, his ten thousand slew…………………(Saul)

MARCH IN JUDAS MACABEUS.

Air, Mr Sapio—Lord, remember David.
Air, Mrs Salmon—Holy, holy, Lord God Almighty
Chorus—The Lord shall reign……………….. [Israel in Egypt]
Recit. Mr Braham—For the host of Pharaoh…      … (Israel in Egypt)
Solo, Miss Stephens—Sin ye to the Lord……[Israel in Egypt]
Grand Double Chorus—The horse and his rider[Israel in Egypt]
Between the First and Second Parts,[Israel in Egypt]

Between the First and Second Parts,

Aria, Madame Camporese—Di tanti palpiti

(Il Trancredi) [sic] . . . . . . Rossini.

A Concerto Grand Piano Forte, Mr Moschelles,

Never performed in London.

PART II

For the first time in this country

THE

Lady of the Lake.

Selected from the celebrated Poem of that name, written by SIR WALTER SCOOT, BART and arranged to ROSSINI’S admired Opera of

LA DONNA DEL LAGO.

Introduction and Chorus—(The Chase)—The Stag at Eve had drunk is fill.
Air, Miss Paton—Ellen—(Evening)—The waves of slow retiring day.
Duet, Miss Paton and Mr Sapio—Ellen and Fitz James(The Meeting)—       What beauty and what grace
Chorus—(The Highland Welcome)—Huntsman rest, thy chase is done.
Duet, Mrs Salmon and Mr Braham—Ellen and Fitz James—(The Departure)        And have we met so soon to part.
Recit. and Air, Madame Vestris—Malcolm Graem—(Absence)—Oh ! what is        Life when we doomed to prove.
Recit. and Air, Mr Kellner—Douglas—(The Return)  I met young Malcolm as        I stray’d.
Recit and Duet, Mrs Salmon and Madame Vestris—Ellen and Malcolm Graem       (The Parting)—Oh ! Risk not thus thy Life for me.
Air, Mr Braham, and Chorus—Rhoderick Dhu and Clansmen—(The Offer)—       Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances.
Air, Mr Sapio—Fitz James—(The Stranger returned)—How sweet is toil      endured for those.
Trio, Mrs Salmon, Mr Braham, and Sapio—Ellen, Fitz James, and      Allan—(The Discovery)—Oh, stranger ! in this hour of fear
Air and Chorus, Madame Vestris—Malcolm Graem—(The Disconsolate Lover)       My bosom night or day.
Recitative and Air, Mrs Salmon, and Chorus—(Stirling Palace)—I did not think       that my fond breast.
In this Piece an additional Orchestra of Wind Instruments will be employed. ——

Between the Second and Third Parts,

Song, Miss Stephens—O the moment was sad.

(Irish Melody)

A Concerto on the Violin, Mr Mori, in which will be

introduced the favorite Rondo, Le petit Tambour

(Mayseder)

PART III.

A GRAND

MISCELLANEOUS ACT.

Which will commence with,

(Third time in this country) a Descriptive Chorus, composed by

BEETHOVEN, translated and adapted from the original German of the

                        eminent Poet Goethe, entitled

The Calm of the Sea and the Rising Breeze;

The Solo Parts by Miss Povey, Master Longhurst, Mr Terrail, and

Mr. Nelson.

Echo Song, Miss Stephens and Mrs Salmon………………..…….Arne.   
Air, Mr Braham—Is there a heart………………………………Braham
Air, Miss Paton—Genius of Freedom…………………………….Parry
Aria, Madame Bulgari—Qual mi circonda……………………….Pavesi
Duetto, Madame Vestris and Mr Sapio—Ah si di mali miei……Handel
Grand Chorus—Hallelujah!…………………………..(Messiah)…….Handel

Principal Vocal Performers

Mrs. SALMONMiss STEPHENS,
Miss POVEY, andand
Madame VESTRISand Miss PATON.

Madame BULGARI (her second appearance in this country.)

And Madame CAMPORESE

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. SAPIO, Mr. TERRAIL,

Mr. NELSON, Master Longhurst, and

Mr. KELLNER,

[His first appearance these two years.][1]

Grand Piano Forte, Mr. MOSCHELLES, (first appearance this season)

Violin, Mr. MORI

The Band will be numerous, and Complete in every Department.

Leader, Mr. SMART.

SIR GEORGE SMART,

Will conduct the Performance, and preside at the Organ, built by

Mr. GRAY; and Mr. WATSON superintend the Chorusses [sic].


[1] Square brackets are not editorial.

The Times (February 21, 1823): 3.

NEW THEATRE ROYAL DRURY-LANE.

THIS EVENING, February 21st, a GRAND PERFORMANCE of ANCIENT and MODERN MUSIC, under the Direction of Mr. BOCHSA. Part I.—(For this night only), a Selection from Handel’s Sacred Oratorio, THE REDEMPTION. Between the First and Second Parts, Recit. ed Aria, Madame Camporese; “O patria,” Concerto Grand Pianoforte, Mr. Moscheles. Part II.—For the first time in this country, The Lady of the Lake, selected from a celebrated poem of. That name, written by Sir Walter Scott, Bart., and arranged to Rossini’s admired opera of La Donna del Lago. Between the Second and Third Parts, Concerto on the Violin, Mr. Mori. Part III.—A Grand Miscellaneous Act, which will commence with, for the 3d time in this country. Beethoven’s descriptive Chorus, translated and adapted from the original German of the eminent poet Goethe, entitled “The Calm of the Sea and the Rising Breeze;” (this piece is one of the latest productions of the above celebrated composer.) Principal Vocal Performers:—Mrs. Salmon, Miss Povey, and Madame Vestris; Miss Stephens, Miss Cubitt, and Miss Paton; Madame Camporese and Madame Bulgari, her second public appearance in this country; Mr. Braham, Mr. Sapio, Mr. Terrail, Mr. Nelson, Master Longhurst, and Mr. Kellner, his first appearance for these two years. Leader, Mr. Smart. At the Organ, Sir George Smart.

Reviews

The Morning Chronicle (February 22, 1823): 3.

DRURY-LANE THEATRE-ROSSINI’S OPERA, The Lady of the Lake, the delaying of which produced such an uproar at Convent-garden Theatre, on Wednesday last, was performed at this House last night. If in its native state, attended by every advantage, that dramatic action, scenery, and decoration could afford, it hung heavily in the Italian Theatre, how much more tedious it proved when forced into an unnatural alliance with English words, badly adapted, sung in an orchestra without distinction of character, and given in that imperfect manner which a deficiency of rehearsals must always render certain, we leave our readers to judge. Of course the whole Opera was not attempted to be given, but only a selection from it, forming one Act of the Oratorio. We were prepared to witness a failure in some parts, but expected to hear an effect produced by the Choruses, in a place where the performers are allowed to sing from book; but in this we were disappointed, and to our astonishment and chagrin, the best part of the finale to the first Act, comprising a triple chorus that is capable of producing a powerful result, was omitted. The first part of the Oratorio was well put together, and induced the company to receive the second with complacency. In the former Mrs. SALMON, Miss STEPHENS, and Mr. BRAHAM, had sung some charming songs from The Redemption; the Choruses went off well and at the end of it, Mad. CAMPORESE gave, in a very superior manner “Tu ch’accendi,” and M. MOSCHELLES played a very animated Piano-forte Concerto, being his first appearance in London this season. These soothing preparations proved very favourable to the succeeding Act from La Donna del Lago; but that this adaptation will not be popular, required no ghost to tell us. The House was not quite full, even at half price, and the many empty private boxes gave to it a very sombre appearance. The performance was protracted t a wearisome length: we quitted the Theatre at the end of the second Act, which was not over till 11 o’clock. The whole, therefore, probably would not terminate till long after midnight.

The Morning Post (February 22, 1823): 3.

ORATORIO.

The Oratorio at Drury-Lane last night drew a very crowded house. The principal attraction of the evening was ROSSINI’S music to the Donna del Lago adapted to English words. Those words, we are told, were principally selected from the well known poem of Sir WALTER SCOTT; but it would be more correct to say partly selected. We wish we could congratulate the Northern Minstrel on the rhymes that are so profusely blended with his own; but this were impossible; and we are besides bound to say that the words but ill sound with the music. MISS STEPHENS sung “Angels ever bright and fair” divinely, and was encored in the beautiful Irish Air of “Savourness deelich.” Madame BULGARI sung with much taste, and was warmly applauded.

The Literary Gazette; and Journal of Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences, &c. (February 22, 1823): 125.

ORATORIOS.—On Friday and Wednesday, Mr. Bochsa gave Oratorios alternately at Drury Lane and Covent Garden. The selection at the first, procured a crowded audience, and went off, in the stage phrase, with eclat. Not so the last. The Lady of the Lake was advertised as the second part—the music of Rossini, to which the English words of Sir Walter Scott’s poem have been adapted by Mr. Bochsa. But unluckily Miss Tree, on whom a chief part fell, had become ill since the preceding evening; and, without an apology, the managers were in consequence substituting the Creation for the Lady of the Lake, when a lond [sic] explosion of displeasure ensued. To be taken all the way back to the Creation with so little ceremony, was more than John Bull could endure, and he began bellowing for the manager accordingly. Excuses, half French half English, were offered, but it must be said that the whole business was very unsatisfactory. As for Rossini’s Donna del Lago, it will be seen by our notice of the King’s Theatre, that its loss was no great loss. Indeed we do not think Rossini will ever be a popular composer in this country. Very little of his, which we have heard, affects the mind; he tickles the ear, but he touches not the heart; and no music was ever relished in England which was destitute of the latter property.

The Theatrical Observer (February 22, 1823): 1-2.

DRURY-LANE.

The Lady of the Lake has proved a great attraction at the Oratorio. This Theatre was last night crowded in every part. The first act was The Redemption, at the end of which Mr. MOSCHELLES executed one of the most brilliant Concertos on the Grand Piano-forte, that we ever heard, even by himself. The second act was from the celebrated Opera of ROSSINI’S La Donna Del Lago, arranged to the English words of SIR WALTER SCOTT. ROSSINI’S style of music is so well known that it needs no criticism; it may its faults, but the beauties so far preponderate, that his composition will ever please. This production possesses, perhaps more of his excellence and less of his faults than any other, and, as it was received with the most flattering marks of approbation, will of course be repeated, and, we hope, often during the Oratorios. It is but justice to say, that the most effective part of the music in the Italian Opera is preserved, and adapted to the beautiful words of SIR WALTER SCOTT’S Poem, and deserves that distinction. It was performed in a far superior style to the Opera itself. There were a few stragglers well planted for the purpose of hissing, but clumsily trained to the business; and the quarter from whence they came, could not have well considered, that if the pieces, so admirably performed, deserved their censure, there could not be any hopes of its serving the Haymarket Establishment. We mention no names, but signals were conspicuous.—SAPIO was indisposed, but sung admirably notwithstanding. Miss STEPHENS was rapturously encored in the beautiful Irish Melody, “O the moment was sad;” she was unable to sing the duet with Mrs. SALMON in the second act. Upon the whole, the performance went off with eclat, and evinced a determined spirit on the part of the proprietor to present novelty and attraction more conspicuous, as the season advances. MORI on the Violin was exquisite. We understand the Oratorios are future to be at Drury Lane only.

The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, vol. 9, (April 1, 1823): 153-154.

ORATORIOS.—These musical performances have been continued twice a-week, in regular succession, at Drury Lane during the whole of the past month, under the direction of Mr. Bochsa, whose exertions have been strenuous, and praiseworthy, both in producing a very great variety of new music, mixed with older compositions of established merit, and in engaging nearly the whole of the first-rate vocal talent in the metropolis, and appointing a complete and competent instrumental orchestra. Besides “Cyrus in Babylon,” noticed in our account of last month, the principal pieces of extent were,— “The Lady of the Lake”—Dr. Crotch’s Oratorio of “Palestine”—“The Creation”—“The Redemption”—Mozart’s “Requiem”—“Acis and Galatea”—“The Messiah;”—and there were a number of classic compositions, of minor extent, by a variety of great masters. As we have given our opinion of Rossini’s “Donna del Lago” in the preceding article, it is unnecessary to enter into a particular account of “The Lady of the Lake,” as performed at the Oratorios. The English text of Sir W. Scott forced under Rossini’s music, and the English singers, by whom the latter was executed, gave but a faint glimpse of the nature of the work. Proper emphasis and accentuation were wanting. Some individuals, whom we will not name, caring little for Rossini’s time, dragged on the notes ad libitum, made gratuitous pauses, cadences, &c., as if they were singing English ballads, and altogether seemed quite out of their element. One lady, in particular, appeared quite abroad, and under constant suffering, from the correct time in the accompaniments. The choruses, however, told, upon the whole, much better than at the King’s Theatre, because the singers were not only more numerous, but decidedly superior. Dr. Crotch’s “Palestine” would be infinitely more interesting if it were only half as long. Its duration wearies the ear and spirits. A selection from it would have been preferable at the Oratorios. It is a scientific, skilful, and meritorious com position; a mixture of old and modern style. Two or three of the melodies are particularly good; but, upon the whole, the Oratorio is not so much distinguished by novelty and sweetness of musical ideas, as by the richness of its harmony. Many of the harmonic combinations are of the first order, others produce a grand and striking effect; the accompaniments possess the utmost variety, and some are peculiarly elegant. The singers and orchestra exerted themselves laudably to do justice to the composition. Among the numerous solo-players on various instruments, the performances of Mr. Moscheles on the piano-forte created the greatest interest. His execution certainly baffles all description: it is beyond what we conceived the piano-forte capable of, until we heard him the winter before last. His play, no doubt, will give a new impulse to our own artists. As a composer, too, we consider Mr. M. to hold an eminent rank. His ideas are as original, vivid, and tasteful, as his play. The Oratorios have invariably been crowded at every performance, by audiences the most respectable; so that Mr. Bochsa is likely to be amply rewarded for his unremitting efforts to satisfy the expectations of the musical public.

The Harmonicon, vol. I (March 1823): 42.

….On the succeeding Friday, The Lady of the Lake was produced, but without Miss Tree. The parts were given to Mrs. Salmon, Miss Paton, Messrs. Braham, Sapio, and Kellner, who did their utmost to give them effect. But these adaptations are mongrel things, which rarely convey the composer’s meaning with any truth, and in the present instance, the words are so extremely ill-fitted to the music, that it seems in a perpetual struggle to throw its companion off. The whole had been very insufficiently rehearsed, particularly the choruses [sic], so that altogether it was coldly received by the judging part of the audience. In the course of this same evening, Μadame Camporese, in “Tu che accendi,” and Mr. Braham in “He was eyes unto the blind,” shewed the perfection of the Italian and English schools of singing. M. Moschelles also exhibited his great powers, in a concerto on the piano-forte; and Miss Stephens sung enchantingly the beautiful Irish melody, “Savourna delish.” The length of this performance has been, with great reason, complained of ; [sic] for beginning at seven, it was not over till between twelve and one o’clock.