2 January 1828

 Fourth Subscription Concert

 

Liverpool: Music Hall

Time: Evening, Quarter to Eight o’Clock

Tickets: Non-Subscribers: 10s. Gallery 7s., Schools and younger branches of Families, 7s

Programme

Principal Vocalists: Miss E. Paton (second appearance at the Music Hall), Mrs. Atkinson; Mr. Phillips
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Mori, Moscheles

———————————

Charlotte: Am 1. Januar nach Liverpool zurückgekehrt, spielte Moscheles hier am 2. im Subscriptions-Concert.[AML I, 184.]

Advertisements

Gore’s General Advertiser (November 22, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

First Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE FIRST CONCERT will take place on TUESDAY next, the 27th instant, and the SECOND, on MONDAY the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA, (Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE, (Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES, the celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (November 23, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

First Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE FIRST CONCERT will take place on TUESDAY next, the 27th instant, and the SECOND, on MONDAY the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA,

(Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE,

(Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED

TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

The celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (November 30, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

Second Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE SECOND CONCERT will take place on MONDAY next, the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA,

(Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE,

(Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED

TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

The celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (December 21, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

Mr. MOSCHELES, THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

THE Third and Fourth Subscription CONCERTS will take place on WEDNESDAY, the 2d of January next, for which the following eminent Vocal and instrumental Performers are engaged:

Mrs. ATKINSON,

(Late Miss Goodall) of the King’s Concerts, Hanover-square;

Miss ELIZA PATON,

(Her first appearance at the Music-hall;)

Mr. PHILIPS;

Mr. MORI;

And Mr. MOSCHELES.

Non Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.; Gallery, 7s.;

Schools, and younger branches of Families, 7s.

No money to be taken at the Doors.

The Performance to commence at a Quarter before Eight.

Zeitung für die elegante Welt (January 12, 1828): 72.

Er [Moscheles] reist nächstens nach Edinburg und wird sich unterwegs in Chester und in Liverpool verweisen, wo er engagirt ist, in zwei Abonnementsconcerten zu spielen.

Gore’s General Advertiser (December 27, 1827): 3.

Music=Ball, Bold-Street.

———

Mr. MOSCHELES, THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

———

THE Fourth Subscription CONCERT will take place on Wednesday next, the 2d of January, for which the following eminent Vocal and Instrumental Performers are engaged:

Mrs. ATKINSON,

(Late Miss Goodall) of the King’s Concerts, Hanover-sq.,

Miss ELIZA PATON,

(Her second appearance at the Music-Hall,)

Mr. PHILLIPS.

Mr. MORI,

And Mr. MOSCHELES.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.—

Gallery, 7s.—Schools & younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors.

The Performance to commence a Quarter before Eight.

Liverpool Mercury (December 28, 1827): 1.

Music=ball, Bold=street.

MR. MOSCHELES, THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

THE Fourth Subscription CONCERT will take place on WEDNESDAY next, the 2d of January, for which the following eminent Vocal and Instrumental Performers are engaged:

Mrs. ATKINSON,

(Late Miss Goodall) of the King’s Concerts, Hanover-square,

Miss ELIZA PATON,

(Her second appearance at the Music-Hall;)

Mr. PHILLIPS;

Mr. MORI;

And Mr. MOSCHELES.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.; Gallery, 7s.;

Schools, and younger branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors.

The Performance to commence a Quarter before Eight.

Zeitung für die elegante Welt (January 12, 1828): 72.

Er [Moscheles] reist nächstens nach Edinburg und wird sich unterwegs in Chester und in Liverpool verweisen, wo er engagirt ist, in zwei Abonnementsconcerten zu spielen.

Reviews

Gore’s General Advertiser (January 3, 1828): 3.

MUSIC HALL, LIVERPOOL.—That fourth subscription Concert attracted, notwithstanding the severity of the weather, a highly fashionable audience last evening. The selections were rich and varied, and gave “ample room and verge enough” for a display of the high talent unlisted for the occasion. The second appearance of Miss E. Paton exceeded, if possible, the effect produced by her first, and fully persevered the interest which attaches to her eminent name. Moscheles was brilliant in the extreme; the correctness of judgement, chasteness of execution and volubility of finger displayed, proved the presidency of a master mind, and called fourth the loudest expressions of admiration. Signor Mori exerted himself with usual effect, and the concert went off in a style which reflects considerable credit upon the spirited proprietor.

Caledonian Mercury (January 10, 1828): 3.

MUSIC HALL, LIVERPOOL.—The fourth subscription concert attracted, notwithstanding the severity of the weather, a highly fashionable audience on Friday evening. The second appearance of Miss Eliza Paton exceeded, if possible, the effect produced by her first, and fully persevered the interest which attaches to her eminent name. Moscheles was brilliant in the extreme, and called forth the loudest expressions of admiration.—Gore’s Advertiser.

23 December 1827

Third Subscription Concert

 

Liverpool: Music Hall

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock

Tickets: Non-Subscribers: 10s. Gallery 7s., Schools and younger branches of Families, 7s.

Programme

Glee for Three Voices, ‘Blow, gentle Gales’Mrs. Atkinson, Miss E. Paton, Mr. PhillipsBishop
Song, ‘Lo! Here the gentle lark’  Miss E. Paton; Flute Accomp.: Mr. WeissBishop
Piano and Violin ConcertanteMessrs. Mori, Moscheles 
Piano Fantasia, The Recollections of Ireland with Orch. Accomp.Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Violin ConcertoMr. Mori 
Principal Vocalists: Miss E. Paton (first appearance at Liverpool), Mrs. Atkinson; Mr. Phillips
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Mori, Moscheles, Weiss 

———————————

Advertisements

The Kaleidoscope: or, Literary and scientific mirror, vol. 6 (November 27, 1828): 173.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

The celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Gore’s General Advertiser (November 22, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

First Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE FIRST CONCERT will take place on TUESDAY next, the 27th instant, and the SECOND, on MONDAY the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA, (Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE, (Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES, the celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (November 23, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

First Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE FIRST CONCERT will take place on TUESDAY next, the 27th instant, and the SECOND, on MONDAY the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA,

(Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE,

(Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED

TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

The celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Gore’s General Advertiser (November 29, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

Second Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE SECOND CONCERT will take place on MONDAY next, the 3d of December, for which

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES, the celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (November 30, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

——

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

Second Appearance, at the Music-hall, of the TYROLESE MINSTRELS, the RAINER FAMILY, under the patronage of his Majesty.

THE SECOND CONCERT will take place on MONDAY next, the 3d of December, for which

MADAME CORNEGA,

(Of the King’s Opera,)

MISS MONTAGUE,

(Madame Cornega’s Pupil,)

AND THE CELEBRATED

TYROLESE FAMILY,

are Engaged.

They sing the beautiful Melodies of their country with an effect as peculiar and striking, that, in the estimation of some of our first judges of music, it is truly magical.

Books for additional Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s. Gallery, 7s. Schools and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

No Money to be taken at the Doors. The Performance to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Mr. MOSCHELES,

The celebrated Pianist, is engaged for Two Concerts, which will take place about Christmas.

Liverpool Mercury (December 21, 1827): 1.

Music=hall, Bold=street.

Mr. MOSCHELES, THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

THE Third and Fourth Subscription CONCERTS will take place on WEDNESDAY, the 2d of January next, for which the following eminent Vocal and instrumental Performers are engaged:

Mrs. ATKINSON,

(Late Miss Goodall) of the King’s Concerts, Hanover-square;

Miss ELIZA PATON,

(Her first appearance at the Music-hall;)

Mr. PHILIPS;

Mr. MORI;

And Mr. MOSCHELES.

Non Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.; Gallery, 7s.;

Schools, and younger branches of Families, 7s.

No money to be taken at the Doors.

The Performance to commence at a Quarter before Eight.

Zeitung für die elegante Welt (January 12, 1828): 72.

Er [Moscheles] reist nächstens nach Edinburg und wird sich unterwegs in Chester und in Liverpool verweisen, wo er engagirt ist, in zwei Abonnementsconcerten zu spielen.

Reviews

Gore’s General Advertiser (December 27, 1827): 3.

MUSIC HALL.—The third Subscription Concert was given last evening. A strong array of musical talent had been announced, and amongst the number was the celebrated pianist, Moscheles    Miss Eliza Paton made a first appearance here, and was received in a most flattering manner; her singing has a great deal of the character of her highly talented sister. Mrs. Atkinson (late Miss Goodall) and our old favourite Mr. Phillips were the other vocalists. Mori, as well as Moscheles, adorned the list of instrumental performers. There perhaps has never been witnessed within the walks of our Music-hall, a more extra ordinary performance than the Concertante between those two celebrated instrumentalists. Moscheles played also a Fantasia in the first part. The audience applauded with enthusiasm. The concert was among the best we have witnessed for a considerable period.

Liverpool Mercury (December 28, 1827): 8.

MUSIC-HALL.

The concert at our Music-hall on Tuesday last was excellent, both in the vocal and instrumental departments, and we have great satisfaction in bearing our testimony to the merits of the orchestra, as we were compelled to pronounce a very different judgment upon a late occasion. Mrs. Atkinson, late Miss Goodall, deservedly obtained great applause; and she fully established a fact, if it required proof, that a female may have a voice after marriage. We trust that it will not be insinuated that we mean, more than “meets the ear.”

Miss Eliza Paton, sister to Lady Lenox, possesses all the requisites for an excellent singer, and, with sedulous practice, and modification of’ the upper tones, she bids fair to equal her sister. If we be permitted to whisper in the ear of so young a lady, we should remind her of Hamlet’s caution to the players,

“And do not mouth it, as some players do.”

The habit of “pulling faces,” to use the common phrase, detracts very much from the effect either of a singer or an actress; and we would, continuing Shakspeare’s [sic] hint, add—

“I pray you, avoid it.”

When we say that Mr. Phillips never sung better, we conceive that we can pay no higher compliment to a singer who, for quality of voice, and correctness of ear, has few equals.

Mr. Moscheles’s finished and astonishing fantasia on the piano-forte delighted every hearer. It must be superfluous to say much about a performer of such universally recognised celerity; but we must not omit to state, that, independent of the performance, the music was a great rarity, and deserves to be classed with those whimsical specimens in which men of fancy and genius occasionally indulge. It is not an usual thing to have two separate airs, as it were, grafted upon each other, as in Haydn’s celebrated Movement, in one variation of which the bass takes up the theme, whilst the treble is engaged on a pleasing and totally distinct melody.

Mr. Moscheles, however, contrived to interlace three separate melodies, of distinct character, into beautifully harmony. After treating his audience with little tasteful snatches of “The Last Rose of Summer,” “St. Patrick’s Day,” and “Garry Owen,” he combined them all together, playing two of the airs himself, and leaving the third to the orchestra. He was long, enthusiastically, and most deservedly cheered. And here we must bring our hasty editorial comments to a close, as we were obliged to quit the concert-room during the first act. We are assured, however, by a musical friend, upon whose judgement we can depend, that the concert was uniformly excellent. Mr. Mori’s concerto was in his usual finished style; and the concertanto duet between him and Mr. Moschelles was, we are assured, equal to any thing ever heard in the Music-hall, or elsewhere.

We hear also, what we can readily believe, that “Blow, gentle Gales,” sung by Mrs. Atkinson, Miss E. Paton, and Mr. Phillips, quite enraptured the audience. We must not omit to add, that our friend was particularly pleased with Mr. Weiss’s flute accompaniment to Miss E. Paton’s song of “Lo! Hear the gentle Lark.”

The Morning Post (December 31, 1827): 3.

MORI and MOSCHELES have been performing at the Liverpool Subscription Concerts with the greatest possible success; their Concertante Duet for the violin and pianoforte was perfection itself. The principal vocalists were Mrs. ATKINSON, (late Miss GOODALL), Miss. E. PATON and PHILLIPS, who sung delightfully.

15 November 1825

Second Winter Subscription Concert

 

Liverpool: Music Hall

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock Non-Subscribers: 10s.

Gallery 7s., Schools and younger branches of Families, 7s.

Programme

*Free Piano Fantasia, incl. ‘Life is darkened,
‘The last Rose of Summer’, and a theme
of Zauberflöte’s Overture
Mr. Moscheles 
*Piano variations on a French AirMr. MoschelesMoscheles
*Piano and Violin Duet on variations
from Rossini’s Semiramide
Messrs. Moscheles, MoriMayseder
*SongsMme Caradori-Allan 
*SongsMr. Phillips 
Part I  
Overture Spohr
Part II  
Overture Rossini
Principal Vocalists: Mme Caradori-Allan; Mr. Phillips  
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Mori, Moscheles
Leader: Mr. Nicolas Mori

———————————

Advertisements

Liverpool Mercury (November 11, 1825): 145.

Music=Hall. Bold=street.

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

Last Night of Mr. MOSCHELLES and Madame CARADORI.

THE Manager has the honour to announce, that the SECOND CONCERT will take place on Tuesday next, the 15th instant, for which

MADAME CARADORI,

Mr. PHILLIPS, Mr. MORI,

And Mr. MOSCHELLES (the celebrated Pianist) are engaged.

Leader, Mr. MORI.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets—for the body of the Room, 10s.

Gallery, 7s.—Schools and younger branches of families, 7s.

Books for Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Doors to be opened at Seven o’clock, and the Concert to commence at Eight.

Due notice will be given of MISS STEPHENS’S first appearance.

Liverpool Mercury (November 11, 1825): 152.

….We are glad to perceive by the advertisement, that the public will have another opportunity, next Tuesday, to hear the eminent performers to whose talents we have just borne our feeble testimony.

The Kaleidoscope: or, Literary and scientific mirror, vol. 6, (November 15, 1825): 160.

Music-hall.—We have been requested to state, that, in consequence of the unexpected disappointment experience on the last concert night, by the absence of several of the performers belonging to the theatrical orchestra, Mr. Wilson has, at a considerable expense, engaged several professional gentlemen of eminence for the concert of this evening (Tuesday, November 15.) Madame Caradori, Mr. Moschelles, and Mr. Phillips, are engaged, and Mr. Mori will lead the band, and an excellent concert may be confidently anticipated.

Review

The Kaleidoscope: or, Literary and scientific mirror, vol. 6, (November 22, 1825): 164.

MUSIC-HALL.

TO THE EDITOR.

SIR,—Our concert on Tuesday night gave such general satisfaction to the audience, that I think you will be induced to notice it in the Kaleidoscope ; and as the scheme was made out rather obscurely, I will give you some explanation of it, which you may use as you please.

The first overture is new, and composed by Spohr. The overture to the second act is composed by Rossini, for the opera of Eduardo e Christina. They were performed excellently; and it is the general desire that they be repeated.

The first piece performed by Mr. Moschelles is a French air; the variations composed by Moschelles.

The duet between Moschelles and Mori is an air from Semiramis; the variations composed by Mayseder. This was the most extraordinary performance I ever heard, and was a complete trial of skill between those two great artists; and it is hard to say which succeeded best. It was a most finished performance, and such as I shall never forget.

Mr. Moschelles, in his extempore, was truly astonishing. The skill with which he introduced, and at times combined, the three themes of “Life is darkened,” “The last Rose of Summer,” and the Overture of the Zauberflote, proves him a man of consummate and deep study in the science; and the perfection, rapidity, and neatness of his execution, I think inimitable.

The band was excellent; and I think, on the whole, the subscribers were amply compensated for their disappointment on the first night.

Madame Caradori sang admirably, and may justly be styled a first-rate singer. Mr. Phillips also sang his songs in a very masterly manner, and bids fair to be the best bass English singer in the United Kingdom.—I write this in the midst of business, which must apologize for the inaccuracies.—I trust you will excuse my obtruding these observations on your notice, and remain, yours truly,

November 16, 1825.                                                                                                            H.H.

8 November 1825

First Winter Subscription Concert

 

Liverpool: Music Hall

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock Non-Subscribers: 10s.

Gallery 7s., Schools and younger branches of Families, 7s

Programme

Grand Piano Variations on a Military March
with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations)
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Concerto No.2 in E flat majorMr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Fantasia incl. ‘Rule Britannia’Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Song SoloMr. Phillips 
Violin MusicMr. Mori 
Principal Vocalists: Mme Caradori-Allan, Mr. Phillips  
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Jackson, Mori, Moscheles, Tayleure, Weiss
Leader: Mr. Nicolas Mori  

———————————

Programme Notes: The piano brand was Clementi.


Moscheles: On the 8th of November, at noon, we had the rehearsal in the Concert Room; but what a rehearsal! Wretched is too tame an expression for it. Mori, the London artist, did all that possibly could be done, but what was to be made out of a band consisting of a double quartet and four halting wind instruments. The director of the theatre played the entrepreneur of the concert, Mr. Wilson, the trick of keeping away the orchestral performers, so that I was obliged to play the first movement of the E flat concerto and the Alexander Variations with a bare quartet accompaniment. The brilliant and numerous audience was much pleased with my Fantasia on ‘Rule Britannia’, and an Irish air: and I was enchanted with my Clementi piano. (RMM, 74)

Advertisements

Liverpool Mercury (October 7, 1825): 105.

Music=Hall. Bold=street.

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

MR. MOSCHELLES,

THE Manager has the honour to announce, that the FIRST and SECOND CONCERTS will take place on Tuesday, the 8th, and Tuesday, the 15th of November. Mr. MOSCHELLES, the celebrated Pianist, is engaged for both Concerts. The Vocal Performers already engaged are

MR. PHILLIPS,

and

MADAME CARADORI,

LEADER, MR. MORI.

Further particulars in a future advertisement.

Dorset County Chronicle (October 20, 1825): 2.

Moscheles is engaged to attend the November Concerts at Liverpool, together with Phillips and Madame Caradori.

Liverpool Mercury (October 21, 1825): 121.

Music=Hall. Bold=street.

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

MR. MOSCHELLES,

THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

THE Manager has the honour to announce, that the FIRST and SECOND CONCERTS will take place on Tuesday, the 8th, and Tuesday, the 15th of November next, for which

MADAME CARADORI,

(Of the King’s Opera, her first appearance at the Music-hall,)

MR. PHILLIPS,

MR. MORI,

and

MR. MOSCHELLES

are engaged.

LEADER, MR. MORI.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.—Gallery, 7s.—Schools, and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

Books for Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Doors to be opened at Seven o’clock, and the Concerts to commence at Eight.

Due notice will be given of MISS STEPHENS’S first appearance.

Liverpool Mercury (November 4, 1825): 137.

Music=Hall. Bold=street.

WINTER SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

MR. MOSCHELLES,

THE CELEBRATED PIANIST.

THE Manager has the honour to announce, that the FIRST and SECOND CONCERTS will take place on Tuesday, the 8th, and Tuesday, the 15th of November next, for which

MADAME CARADORI,

(Of the King’s Opera, her first appearance at the Music-hall,)

MR. PHILLIPS,

MR. MORI,

and

MR. MOSCHELLES

are engaged.

LEADER, MR. MORI.

Non-Subscribers’ Tickets to the Body of the Room, 10s.—Gallery, 7s.—Schools, and younger Branches of Families, 7s.

Books for Subscribers are open at the usual places.

Doors to be opened at Seven o’clock, and the Concerts to commence at Eight.

Due notice will be given of MISS STEPHENS’S first appearance.

Reviews

Liverpool Mercury (November 11, 1825): 152.

THE MUSIC-HALL.—Any person on perusing the bill, announcing the performance of  Last Tuesday, at the Music-hall, must have anticipated as rich a treat us combined professional talent can afford. We are among the number of those whose high expectations on that occasion were by no means realized. The concert, as a whole, was very inferior to those which the proprietor is in the habit of providing for the pubic; or which a Liverpool audience has a right to expect from the high price of admission. It is but justice to Mr. Willson to add, that the falling off did not attach in any degree to him; and we are sorry on this occasion to be obliged to state, that the disappointment which the public must have experience, was occasioned by a want of liberality, or of courtesy, on the part of the managers of the Theatre. Those gentlemen have been, hitherto, in the habit of permitting certain very efficient members of their theatrical orchestra to perform at the Music-hall, on the Tuesday’s concert nights; and Mr. Willson felt entire confidence that such arrangement would not have been wantonly or prematurely disturbed. On the Monday evening, however, notice was given in the green-room of the Theatre, that no members of the theatrical orchestra would be permitted to play on the succeeding evening at the Music-hall. The consequence of this sudden and unexpected prohibition was, that Mr. Willson had not time afforded to complete his band; and Madame Caradori and Mr. Moschelles in making their debut before a Liverpool audience, were accompanied by a meagre and inefficient band, which detached very materially from the full development of their powers. Will it be believed that there was scarcely a wind instrument, with the exception of Mr. Weiss’s effective flute? and that the whole bass accompaniments consisted of one double bass and one single violoncello? The concert would, in all probability, have been altogether destitute of bass, had not Mr. Jackson and Mr. Tayleure ventured to disregard the green-room mandate.

We have been informed by person, upon whom we think we can depend, that it was perfectly understood between the managers of the Theatre and the proprietor of the Music-hall, that if the latter did not give any public concerts before November, the former would afford him every accommodation.

We are aware that the managers of our Theatre, as long as the present horse spectacle has a run, must have occasion for all the strength of their own orchestra; but when we recoilect [sic] that Mr. Willson’s concert had been announced for several weeks, we cannot acquit them of having uncourteous to that gentleman, and unaccommodating to the Liverpool public.

In any satisfactory explanation can be given of the circumstance which we have thus felt it our duty to notice; or if we have unintentionally misrepresented the fact, we shall be most ready to do all parties justice in our next publication.

Madame Caradori, notwithstanding the very severe cold under which she was labouring, and the meagre state of the orchestra, was very well received, and evinced superior powers.—of Mr. Moschelles’s performance on the piano-forte, in point of execution, it is impossible to speak in adequate terms. Our readers have often heard the chromatic passaged played up and down with wonderful rapidity, and if their taste accords with ours, they would, at any time, readily dispense with an exhibition of dexterity, which is as unmusical as it is difficult. Mr. Moschelles, however, executes the double half notes with as much rapidity and precision as the single semi-tones are generally played; and the rapidity which he executed the octave, is truly astonishing.—Of Mr. Mori’s performance we need only say, that it fully merited the praises we have uniformly bestowed upon it.—We ought not to omit adding, that Mr. Phillips was much and deservedly applauded. Nothing, indeed, except the eminent professional talents of the individuals we have just named, could have rendered the concert tolerable under the circumstances to which we have adverted. We are glad to perceive by the advertisement, that the public will have another opportunity, next Tuesday, to hear the eminent performers to whose talents we have just borne our feeble testimony