13 October 1828

First Subscription Concert by William Gutteridge

Brighton: Assembly Rooms, Ship Hotel

Time: Evening, Eight o’Clock

Tickets: £1. 8s. for four Concerts;

Family Tickets to admit 3 £3. 16s. for four Concerts [Non-Subscribers]: 10s. 6d., Gallery, 3s.

 

Programme

Part I  
Overture, Semiramide Rossini
From Otello  
Duet, ‘Non m’inganno, al mio rivale’
Signor Curioni, Mr. SchützRossini
From La donna del lago  
Aria, ‘Oh! quante lagrime’
Mme SchützRossini
Harp Concertino Reminiscences of Scotland,
incl. ‘Scots wha hae wi’ Wallace bled’, ‘A Highland lad my love was born’, ‘Robin Adair’
Mr. BochsaBochsa
From Mosè in Egitto  
Duet, ‘Ah! Se puoi cosi lasciarmi’
Mme Schütz, Signor CurioniRossini
Grand Piano Variations on a Military March
 with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations)
Mr. Moscheles (first performance in Brighton)Moscheles
VariationsMme SchützRode
Trio, ‘Dopo due lustri’Mme Schütz, Mr. Schütz, Signor CurioniPaër
Part II  
Quartet, for Voice, Piano, Flute, Violin,
incl. an Air by Blangini
Mme Schütz, Messrs. Moscheles, Bochsa, GutteridgeMoscheles
Cavatina, ‘Ella il mio cor feri’Signor Curioni  Pacini
From Don Giovanni    
Duet, ‘Mädchen wie ich dich liebe’ (from the Italian ‘Là ci darem la mano’)  
Mme Schütz, Mr. SchützMozart
Free Piano FantasiaMr. Moscheles 
‘La Tyrolliene’Mme Schütz;
Harp Obbligato: Mr. Bochsa
J. Payer
Symphony Fragment Haydn
Principal Vocalists: Mme Schütz; Mr. Schütz, Signor Curioni
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Bochsa, Gutteridge, Moscheles
Leader: Mr. William Gutteridge; Conductor: Mr. Robert Bochsa

———————————

Programme Notes: In the review by the Brighton Gazette the cavatina was referred to as ‘Essa il mio cor feri’ whereas it was advertised as ‘Ella il mio cor feri’. The Brighton Guardian and the Brighton Herald advertised the cavatina Margeritta D’Anjou by Bochsa and Meyerbeer instead, however according to the reviews it was Pacini’s cavatina that was performed.


Moscheles: Auch eine kleine Excursion nach Brighton und sein dortiges Spielen im Subscriptions-Concert, fällt in diesem Herbst.

Meine Stücke —Alexander-Variationen—Abschied des Troubadours und Phantasie über „Last rose of Summer” und „God save the King”—waren der dort versammelten fashionablen Gesellschaft eben recht, und sehr recht; das circa halbe Orchester mir aber ganz unrecht. [AML I, 201-202.]

Advertisements

The Brighton Guardian, Lewes Free Press, and Sussex, Surrey, Kent, and Hampshire Journal (October 1, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, OLD SHIP.

——

MR. GUTTERDIGE has the honor to inform the Nobility, Gentry, the Visitors at Brighton, and the Public, that his FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT will take place on MONDAY, the 13th of October next, at the above Rooms, on the great scale of former years.

Principal Performers—MADAME SCHUTZ, Prima Donna at the Opera Italian, Paris, and King’s Theatre, London, her first appearance in Brighton; SIGNOR CURIONI, and MR. SCHUTZ. Grand Piano Forte, MR. MOSCHELES, his first and only appearance at Brighton. Harp, MR. BOCHSA. Leader, MR. GUTTERIDGE. Conductor, MR. BOCHSA.

In the course of this Concert, will be Sung a Selection from the most admired works of Mozart, Beethoven, Weber, Rossini, Blangini, &c. &c. &c., in German, Italian and French.

Full particulars will be dully announced.

The principal performers who will appear in the course of the series are—Madame CARADORI, Miss PATON, Miss STEPHENS, Madame STOCKHAUSEN, Madame De VIGO, Mr. BRAHAM, Mr. PHILLIPS, Mr. SEGUIN, Messrs. SPAGNOLETTI, NICHOLSON, LINDLEY, BROOKS, DRAGONETTI, SPAGNOLETTI, and STOCKHAUSEN.

Subscribers’ names received at the Music Warehouse, 16, Castle-square. Single Admission Ticket for four Concerts, £1 8s. Family Ticket, admitting three persons to four Concerts, £3 16s. Single Admission Ticket for one concert, 10s. 6d.

Brighton Herald; or Sussex, Surrey, Hampshire, and Kent Advertiser (October 4, 1828): 2.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, OLD SHIP.

——

MR. GUTTERDIGE has the honor to inform the Nobility, Gentry, the Visitors at Brighton, and the Public, that his

FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT

Will take place on MONDAY, the 13th of OCTOBER NEXT, at the above Rooms, on the great scale of former years.

PRINCIPAL PERFORMERS:—

MADAME SCHUTZ,

Prima Donna at the Opera Italian, Paris, and King’s Theatre,

London, her first appearance in Brighton;

SIGNOR CURIONI, AND MR. SCHUTZ.

Grand Piano-Forte………………..MR. MOSCHELES,

his first and only appearance at Brighton.

Harp—MR. BOCHSA.

Leader—MR. GUTTERIDGE. Conductor—MR. BOCHSA.

In the course of this Concert, will be Sung a Selection from the most admired works of Mozart, Beethoven, Weber, Rossini, Blangini, &c. &c. &c., in German, Italian and French.

☞Full particulars will be dully announced.

The principal Performers who will appear in the course of the series are—

Madame CARADORI, Miss PATON, Miss STEPHENS,

Madame STOCKHAUSEN, Mad. de VIGO,

Mr. BRAHAM,

Mr. PHILLIPS, Mr. SEGUIN,

Messrs. SPAGNOLETTI, NICHOLSON, LINDLEY,

BROOKS, DRAGONETTI, , and STOCKHAUSEN.

Subscribers’ names received at the Music Warehouse, 16, Castle-square. Single Admission Ticket for four Concerts, 1l 8s. Family Ticket, admitting three persons to four Concerts, 3l 16s. Single Admission Ticket for one concert, 10s. 6d.

The Brighton Guardian, Lewes Free Press, and Sussex, Surrey, Kent, and Hampshire Journal (October 8, 1828): 1.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, OLD SHIP.

——

MR. GUTTERDIGE has the honor to inform the Nobility, Gentry, the Visitors at Brighton, and the Public, that his FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT will take place on MONDAY, the 13th of October next, at the above Rooms, on the great scale of former years

Principal Performers—MADAME SCHUTZ, Prima Donna at the Opera Italian, Paris, and King’s Theatre, London, her first appearance in Brighton; SIGNOR CURIONI, and MR. SCHUTZ. Grand Piano Forte, MR. MOSCHELES, his first and only appearance at Brighton. Harp, MR. BOCHSA. Leader, MR. GUTTERIDGE. Conductor, MR. BOCHSA

PROGRAMME.

PART I.

Overture—(first time in Brighton)—SEMIRAMIDE . .Rossini.
Duetto—Signor CURIONI and Mr. SCHUTZ—Non 
     m’inganno—OTTELO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
Aria—Madame SCHUTZ—Oh quante lagrime—LA 
     LA DONNA DEL LAGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
Concertino—Harp—Mr. BOCHSA—“The Reminisc- 
    cences of Scotland,”—(as performed by him 
    at his last Concert in London) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bochsa.
Duetto—Madame SCHUTZ & Signor CURIONI,— 
    Ah se puoi—MOSE IN EGITTORossini.
Fantasia—Grand Piano Forte—Mr. MOSCHELES, 
     (his first and only performance in Brighton)Moscheles.
Rode’s celebrated Variations—Madame SCHUTZ
Trio—Madame SCHUTZ, Signor CURIONI, & Mr.
    SCHUTZ—Dopo due lustri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Paer.

PART II.

Quartetto—For Voice, Piano Forte, Harp, & Violin, 
     Madame SCHUTZ, Mr. MOSCHELES, Mr.
     BOCHSA, & Mr. GUTTERIDGE—(in which will be intro- 
     will be introduced a favourite air by Blangini.)Moscheles.
Cavatina—Signor CURIONI—MARGHERITTA
     D’ANJOU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bochsa &Meyerbeer.
Duetto—Madame SCHUTZ and Mr. SCHUTZ—DON
     GIOVANNI (in German) as composed ori- 
     ginally by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mozart.
Extemporaneous Performance—Grand Piano Forte 
     —Mr. MOSCHELES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 
LA TYROLIENNE—Madame SCHUTZ—Harp 
     Obligato—Mr. BOCHSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J. Payer.
Fragment of Sinfonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Haydn.
The Concert to commence at Eight o’Clock

The principal performers who will appear in the course of the series are—Madame CARADORI, Miss PATON, Miss STEPHENS, Madame STOCKHAUSEN, Madame De VIGO, Mr. BRAHAM, Mr. PHILLIPS, Mr. SEGUIN, Messrs. SPAGNOLETTI, NICHOLSON, LINDLEY, BROOKS, DRAGONETTI, SPAGNOLETTI, and STOCKHAUSEN.

Subscribers’ names received at the Music Warehouse, 16, Castle-square. Single Admission Ticket for four Concerts, £1 8s. Family Ticket, admitting three persons to four Concerts, £3 16s. Single Admission Ticket for one concert, 10s. 6d.

Brighton Gazette (October 9, 1828): 2.

ASSEMBLY ROOMS, OLD SHIP.

SCHEME OF MR. GUTTERIDGE’S FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT, on MONDAY Evening, OTOBER 13, 1828.

Principal Performers—MADAME SCHUTZ, Prima Donna at the Opera Italien, Paris, and King’s Theatre, London, her first appearance in Brighton; SIGNOR CURIONI, and MR. SCHUTZ. Grand Piano Forte, MR. MOSCHELES, his first and only appearance at Brighton. Harp, MR. BOCHSA.

Leader, MR. GUTTERIDGE. Conductor, MR. BOCHSA.

PART I.

OVERTURE—(First time in Brighton)—SEMI- 
     RAMIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
DUETTO—Signor CURIONI and Mr. SCHUTZ 
     —Non m’inganno—OTTELO . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
ARIA—Madame SCHUTZ—Oh quante lagrime 
     —LA DONNA DEL LAGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
CONCERTINO—HARP—Mr. BOCHSA—“The 
    Reminiscences of Scotland,” (as performed by 
    him at his last Concert in London). . . . . . . . . .Bochsa.
DUETTO—Madame SCHUTZ and Signor CU- 
    RIONI—Ah se puoi—MOSE IN EGITTORossini.
FANTASIA—Grand Piano Forte—Mr. MO- 
    SCHELES—“Fall of Paris,” by particular 
    desire, (his first and only performance in 
    Brighton) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Moschelles.
RODE’S CELEBRATED VARIATIONS—Madame
    SCHUTZ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRIOMadame SCHUTZ, Signor CURIONI,
    And Mr. SCHUTZ—Dopo due lustr! . . . . . . . .Paer.

PART II.

QUARTETTO—For Voice, Piano Forte, Harp, 
     and Violin—Madame SCHUTZ, Mr. MO-
     SCHELES, Mr. BOCHSA, and Mr. 
     GUTTERIDGE—(in which will be intro-
     duced a favourite air by Blangini) . . . . . . . . . .Moscheles.
CAVATINA—Sig. CURIONI—Ella il mio cor feriPaccini.
DUETTO—Madame SCHUTZ and Mr. SCHUTZ
     —DON GIOVANNI (in German) as com- 
     posed originally by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mozart.
EXTEMPORANEOUS PERFORMANCE——Grand 
     Piano Forte—Mr. MOSCHELES . . . . . . . . . . 
LA TYROLIENNE——Madame SCHUTZ—
      Harp Obligato, Mr. BOCHSA . . . . . . . . . . . . .J. Payer.
Fragment of SINFONIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Haydn.

Doors will be opened at half-past Seven, and the Concert to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Subscribers’ names received at the Music Warehouse, 16, Castle-square, where books of the words may be had. Single Admission Ticket for four concerts, £1 8s. Family Ticket, admitting three persons to four concerts, £3 16s. Single Admission Tickets for once concert, 10s. 6d. Admission to the Gallery 3s.

Brighton Herald; or Sussex, Surrey, Hampshire, and Kent Advertiser (October 11, 1828): 2.

Assembly Rooms, Old Ship.

MR. GUTTERDIGE has the honor to inform the Nobility, Gentry, the Visitors at Brighton, and the Public, that his

FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT

Will take place on MONDAY, the 13th of OCTOBER NEXT, at the above Rooms, on the great scale of former years.

PRINCIPAL PERFORMERS:—

MADAME SCHUTZ,

Prima Donna at the Opera Italian, Paris, and King’s Theatre,

London, her first appearance in Brighton;

SIGNOR CURIONI, AND MR. SCHUTZ.

Grand Piano-Forte………………..MR. MOSCHELES,

his first and only appearance at Brighton.

Harp—Mr. BOCHSA.

Leader—Mr. GUTTERIDGE. Conductor—Mr. BOCHSA.

PROGRAMME.

PART I.

OVERTURE—First time in Brighton)—SEMIRA- 
    MIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
DUETTO—Signor CURIONI and Mr. SCHUTZ 
     —Non m’inganno—OTTELO . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
ARIA—Madame SCHUTZ—Oh quante lagrime— 
     —LA DONNA DEL LAGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rossini.
CONCERTINO—Harp—Mr. BOCHSA—“The 
    Reminiscences of Scotland”—(as performed 
    By him at his last Concert in London). . . . . . . . . .Bochsa.
DUETTO—Madame SCHUTZ and Signor CU- 
    RIONI—Ah se puoi—MOSE IN EGITTO. . . . . .Rossini.
FANTASIA—Grand Piano Forte—Mr. MOSCHE- 
    LES—“Fall of Paris,” by particular desire, 
    (his first and only performance in Brighton)Moscheles.
RODE’S CELEBRATED VARIATIONS—Madame
    SCHUTZ.
TRIO—Madame SCHUTZ, Signor CURIONI,
    And Mr. SCHUTZ—Dopo due lustri . . . . . . . . . . .Paer.

PART II.

QUARTETTO—For Voice, Piano Forte, Harp, 
     and Violin—Madame SCHUTZ, Mr. MOS-
     CHELES, Mr. BOCHSA, and Mr. GUTTE- 
     RIDGE—(in which will be introduced a
     favourite Air by Blangini) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Moscheles.
CAVATINA—Signor CURIONI—MARGERITTA
     D’ANJOU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bochsa &Meyerbeer.
DUETTO—Madame SCHUTZ & Mr. SCHUTZ 
     —DON GIOVANNI (in German) as composed 
     originally by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mozart.
EXTEMPORANEOUS PERFORMANCE—Grand Pi- 
    ano Forte—Mr. MOSCHELES 
LA TYROLIENNE—Madame SCHUTZ—Harp 
     Obligato—Mr. BOCHSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J. Payer.
FRAGMENT OF SINFONIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Haydn.
                         

Doors will be opened at half-past seven, and the Concert to commence at Eight o’Clock.

Subscribers’ names received at the Music Warehouse, 16, Castle-square, where books of the words may be had. Single Admission Ticket for four Concerts, 1l. 8s. Family Ticket, admitting three persons to four Concerts, 3l. 16s. Single Admission Ticket for one Concert, 10s. 6d.

It is respectfully announced that no person can be admitted into the Concert Room during the Rehearsal.

Reviews

The Brighton Guardian, Lewes Free Press, and Sussex, Surrey, Kent, and Hampshire Journal (October 15, 1828): 3.

Mr. Gutteridge’s first Concert.—Gutteridge opened the campaign for the winter, on Monday evening last, with a degree of spirit and energy, which cannot fail to insure him success, and which we hail as a happy omen of the approaching gay and festive season. His bill, which was stronger in the instrumental than in the vocal department, was ample and attractive, and exhibited the names of Moscheles, of M. and Mdme. Schutz, who were all new to a Brighton audience. Moscheles is too well known and admired to require any eulogium from our pen: the lady has not been long in England, and is not so generally known. Her qualifications are of a very superior order and will render her a general favorite. Her voice, though not possessing any extraordinary powers or very extensive compass, is extremely melodious; her general style as a singer is highly pleasing, and her face and person prepossessing in the extreme. The chief drawback to the pleasure we derived from her performance consisted in the inequality of enunciation; while some of the higher notes were unnecessarily prominent and loud, the lower tones went frequently inaudible or indistinct to those at the lower end of the room. M. Schutz has a good bass voice and is considered a skilful musician. The orchestra (especially when we reflect that the p resent was the first concert this season) was extremely well disciplined, and the beautiful Overture to Semiramide has executed in a style which did ample justice to the exquisite music of Rossini. The effect suffered a little from the loud stamping of the conductor, interrupting unnecessarily the fine commencement of this beautiful composition. Curioni, in a duet with M. Schutz, from Rossini’s Otello, displayed (especially in the concluding couplet) more energy than we ever witnessed in this able, but occasionally, apathetic singer. Mdme. Schutz next sang an air from the same pieces “Oh! quante lagrime,” in which she was admirably supported by the Orchestra, who played the accompaniment, in a transposed key, with correctness and tack which did them infinite honour. Bochsa then gave on the Harp his “Reminiscences of Scotland” in which he introduced with great effect, some of the most popular Scotch airs, as “Scots wha hae wi’ Wallace bled;” “A Highland lad my love was born,” and “Robin Adair;” many of his cadences in the latter melody were eminently beautiful subdued the auditory to almost breathless silence. Curioni and Madame Schutz then sang most sweetly a duet from Rossini’s Mose in Egitto; which was followed by Moscheles, splendid performance on the piano “The Fall of Paris,” the power and brilliancy of which were unrivalled, and excited the unmingled admiration of all present. Madame Schutz then sang the well known air with variations, by Rode, and acquitted herself with great eclat, though, we are of opinion, that the song is not exactly adapted to her powers of voice. A Trio by Paer, closed the first portion of the evening’s performance, which we must observe, en passant, was somewhat too long, especially in comparison with the second part which was considerably shorter. The second part commenced with a quartet, in which Madame Schutz sang with accompaniments on Piano, Harp, and Violin, Moscheles, Bochsa, and Gutteridge. Curioni followed in a cavatini by Pacini, with much feeling and force; and M. and Madame Schutz sang, in an exquisite style, to the original German words, the beautiful air in Mozart’s Don Giovanni, “La ci darem.” Moscheles followed with an Extemporaneous Performance on the Grand Piano, to describe the various excellences of which is impossible, since such an effort must be witnessed in order duly to be appreciated. We can only say, in general terms, such was the finished effect of the whole, that this improvisatore attempt might have passed for a studied performance. The snatches of melody in the form of airs, &c., which he introduced were so beautifully, that we are convinced, if copied and published, they could not fail to become general favorites; while the fine national anthem, God save the King, (with impromptu variations of the most brilliant and fanciful kind) formed a splendid climax to this truly wonderful production of science. Such an effort is, in fact, the perfection of art, and we can neither conceive nor desire any thing beyond it. Madame Schutz sang one of the wild Tyrolese airs with all its native sweetness, yet (probably from exhaustion, for this was her seventh song) we noticed that indistinctness to which we have before alluded, and which we think she would do well to guard against in general. A fragment of Haydn’s composition closed the performance of the evening. The room was very well attended, though (doubtless from the early period of the season) it was not quite so crowded as we have seen it before. We know not how to conclude without adverting to the arduous efforts of Mr. Gutteridge, and without claiming for him that support which his liberality and spirit deserve. Those who are aware of the difficulty, toil, and expence of getting up an entertainment of this nature, will appreciate his efforts the more, when we remind them, that he was the first to establish these concerts, at a time when such undertakings were considered hopeless and calculated to overwhelm their projector with failure and loss. He has, however, persevered until he has succeeded in establishing a series of these delightful amusements; he has increased the attractions of the place, and enlarged our sphere or refined gratifications, thus encouraging an elegant and refined taste among us.  The brilliant soirée of Monday last affords fresh pledge of his zeal in the public caused and we sincerely wish him all success in his ensuing career.

We are happy to hear that Madame Schütz remains in Brighton for a few weeks, and intends giving lessons in singing. Madame S. is at the old Ship.

Brighton Gazette (October 16, 1828): 3.

SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS.

The first the concerts for the present season took place on Monday the Old Ship, and was numerously attended. The evening’s performances were far more attractive than at the first concert last year, proof of which we need only mention that Moscheles and Madame Schulz both appeared for the first time in Brighton, and that the latter sang with her husband some of the original German words from Don Giovanni. With Moscheles, the principal feature and charm of the concert, we shall begin. He played in three pieces,—his own celebrated “Fall of Paris”, an extemporaneous piece, and in quartett for piano, harp, violin and voice, with Bochsa, Gutteridge, and Madame Schutz. His touch is perfectly astonishing, and his execution unequalled; his harmony is peculiarly distinct and the melody is not for a single moment lost. With the right hand keeps up rapid and brilliant passage, while the left continues the melody and bass the same time; he then dexterously continues the air with his right hand, his execution being equally brilliant as with the left. This was particularly observable in the “Fall of Paris”, and again in the variations on “God Save the King”, which never remember to have heard so deliciously opened. To those who have never listened this incomparable pianist, no description will suffice paint the full beauty of performance; many passages were like the exquisite warbling the sweetest birde [sic], and we are convinced the audience could have sat for hours untired. It was amusing to notice the effect which he produced the orchestra; the musicians involuntarily applauded, and one stood motionless with his eyes fixed upon Moscheles during the whole time he played. The voice of Madame Schutz is sweet, full, rich and well in tune; the lower tones very soft and sweet, but not powerful. She sings with much feeling and great taste, modulates her tones with evident care, and succeeds rendering them exceedingly effective: their volume falls on the ear like the sostenuto of an organ stop. Madame Schutz sang several pieces, but did not produce much impression until she gave Rode’s celebrated variations, which she executed in a brilliant style. The duet from Don Giovanni, “Madchen wie ich dich liebe,” (the La ci darem of the Italian Opera) which she sang with her husband, who has a fine voice and is a very good singer, was very effective, and some parts were exquisitely sweet; but the Tyrolienne (Was ist a madel?) on which much dependence had been placed, and in which she was always encored at Paris, went off flatly. The neglect which this accomplished singer has experienced in London (at the hands least of the managers of the King’s Theatre, for most certainly the public have had nothing to with it) is difficult be accounted for; it can only be explained on the ground that Pasta and Sontag left no room for others to display their talent. Her debut in Sesto was most brilliant, and the encores on that occasion unusually numerous. It has been said that she shines more in the concert room than upon the stage, but this is an opinion from which we differ entirely; for when her splendid acting is lost, a great portion of the charm is lost with it, as is the case with Pasta. We shall be much surprised Madame Schutz is not more heard during the next season. Curioni, who great favourite here, was in excellent voice, and we never heard any thing more exquisite than his cavatina from Pacini (Essa il mio cor feri) at the commencement of the second part. That it was not encored surprised us greatly; but the audience seemed cold to all but Moscheles, and (an unprecedented occurrence) there was not a single encore during the evening. The band, which was reinforced by some the Tenth, and two or three of Bochsa’s pupils, played remarkably well, and performed the overture (Semiramide) in a masterly style. We were never more charmed by Bochsa’s harp than on this occasion; the “Reminiscences of Scotland,” (his own composition) was most delightful, the various snatches of the airs of Caledonia being introduced in an exquisite manner. Altogether the concert went off extremely well, and has given gratifying earnest of the entertainment that may be expected from those which are to succeed.

Brighton Herald; or Sussex, Surrey, Hampshire, and Kent Advertiser (October 18, 1828): 3.

GUTTERDIGE’S FIRST SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT.—We augur well for our musical gratification this season from the. Excellent style in which the usual series of subscription concerts, established in this town by the exertions of Mr. Gutteridge, has begun. At the same time we feel authorized the immediate and sole control of that gentleman; and we cannot refrain from repeating the hope which we expressed in the Herald last year, that the leaders of the fashionable world, will not bestow their interest on strangers, in preference to the equally, if not more deserving inhabitants, who sustain much labour, considerable expense, and, we fear, sometimes considerable losses for their amusement. We hope that the latter was not the case on Monday evening, though the company did not appear to us so numerous as we have before witnessed it, notwithstanding the great attractions presented in the persons of a new female singer of considerable eminence and talent, Madame Schütz; and, especially, of that admirable pianist, Moscheles, who proved the great wonder and delight of the evening. Madame Schütz is of a good school, but rather an interesting than a brilliant singer, and we think we should like her better on a second hearing; her voice is soft and sweet, and not quite calculated for some of the airs, such as Rode’s, which she undertook, but we attribute the want of an encore, for there was not one the whole evening, not to the singer’s. deficiency in merit, but to the customary apathy of a fashionable audience, with whom it is contrary to etiquette to seem very much pleased at any thing; yet we must do them justice to say that Moscheles surprised them into most. Exuberant demonstrations of applause, which, proceeding from such an assembly, are the greatest testimony of a performer’s deserts. His “Fall of Paris” was brilliant, as usual, but is too well known to require any observations of ours on his manner of performing it; but the exquisiteness of his extemporaneous Fantasia, for tone, fingering, brilliancy of execution, and tenderness of expression, is beyond praise; and the manner in which he introduced and played “God Save the King,” might have made a Radical loyal for once in his life. We had, at the conclusion of this piece, almost forgotten ourselves, as The Honest Hibernians once did, when they encored an extempore of this great performer. Bochsa, we thought, played with more than even his usual spirit, a most beautiful concertino of his own composition, called the “Reminiscences of Scotland;” and no small praise is due to a musician who, like him will undergo the fatigue and anxiety of performing a solo, and directing an orchestra, on the same evening. Our old favourite, Curioni, was in beautiful voice: and there is a modesty about Mr. Schütz which, added to the artist-like manner in which he sings, renders him particularly pleasing. Indeed, one of the most effective things of the evening was the beautiful duet from Don Giovanni, with the original German words, by Mr. and Madame Schütz, who, we understand, are no staying in Brighton with the intention of giving lessons We cannot conclude without complimenting the orchestra generally on. Their performance: and they deserve great credit. For the accuracy with which they transposed into another key, to accommodate the singers, the accompaniment to the beautiful duet of “Ah se puoi.” The band was ably led by Mr. Gutteridge. We understand that the next concert will take place in about three weeks.

12 December 1832

Party Dinner

Brighton: Royal Pavilion

 

Programme

Grand Piano Variations on a Military March
with Orch. Accomp. (Alexander Variations)
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Fantasia, Recollections of England (new)Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
Piano Fantasia, The Recollections of Ireland   
with Orchestral Accompaniments
Mr. MoschelesMoscheles
From The Creation: Double QuartetMr. Moscheles 
From Robert le diable, [?] Meyerbeer
Principal Instrumentalists: Mr. Moscheles

———————————

Charlotte: As he worked at the Septet steadily every evening, a royal command to play before the Court at Brighton was an unwelcome interruption, but being assured by a friend that he would play immediately after his arrival, he started on the evening of the 11th of December. [RMM, 185.]

Moscheles: Trotz eines Rendezvous, welches mir der Oberkapellmeister Sir Andrew Barnard um zehn Uhr im Pavillon (dem königlichen Schlosse) gegeben hatte, traf ich ihn zu keiner Stunde. Auch Dr. Davis, der mich durch eine Karte auf zwei Uhr zu sich bescheiden liess, war nicht zu sehen. Meine grosse Anhängerin, Lady C., ich dies klagte, musste, wie ich, befürchten, Sir Andrew sei mir feindlich und nur Italienern freundlich gesinnt. Sie schrieb ihm, und verlangte Aufklärung. Dies verschaffte mir die Ehre seines Anblicks. Ich wüsste längst, sagte er, dass ich heute Abend bei Hofe spielen sollte.—„Wieso?“ fragte ich.—„„Hat Ihnen Dr. Davis Nichts gesagt?““—„Nein!“ —Hierauf einige höfliche Phrasen seinerseits, und der Antrag, den Erard im Pavillon zu probiren; ich fand ihn angequollen und steif, weil er lange in einem kalten Salon gestanden, musste mich aber doch über Hals und Kopf zu seiner Benutzung vorbereiten und fand nicht einmal Zeit mit der königlichen Kapelle zu probiren. Mit dieser traf ich nun Abends bei magischer Beleuchtung in dem phantastisch decorirten Musiksaal des Pavillons zusammen. Das Ganze machte einen feenartigen Eindruck. König William IV. und Königin Adelaide erschienen mit der königlichen Familie und setzten sich ans entfernteste Ende des Saales, der Hofstaat auch weit vom Clavier weg, und ich wurde nicht vorgestellt. Ich spielte meine neue. Phantasie über englische Nationallieder, die der Königin dedicirt waren. Der König allein näherte sich während dieser dem Clavier und schien zuzuhören, nickte sogar herablassend, als ich aufstand; sein Mund blieb aber stumm. Die Gesellschaft unterhielt sich laut. Sir Andrew forderte mich auf, Orgel zu spielen, und später musste ich die Kapelle (ein ziemlich ungeschultes Doppelquartett), in einigen Vorträgen aus der „Schöpfung“ begleiten. An meinen Alexander-Variationen und der Improvisation nahmen nur die Princess Augusta und die Marchioness of Cornwallis, trotz grossen Geräusches im Saal, Antheil. Noch wurden Stücke aus „Robert le Diable“ von der Kapelle ausgeführt und endlich mit „God save the King“ geschlossen. Der Hof zog sich zurück, nachdem Sir Andrew der Königin das Exemplar meiner englischen Phantasie überreicht, eine Ehre, um die ich für mich angehalten, die er mir aber verweigert hatte. Er fertigte mich wieder. mit einigen höfichen, höfischen Phrasen über die Zufriedenheit Ihrer Majestäten ab, und die Gesellschaft wechselte kein Wort mit mir. [AML I, 256-257.]

Charlotte: Kein Wunder, dass Moscheles Brighton ärgerlich verliess, aber die Freude, wieder bei den Seinigen zu sein, verwischte bald diese unangenehmen Eindrücke. [AML I, 257.]

Reviews

The Morning Post (December 17, 1832): 3.

Moscheles had the honour of performing on the pianoforte before their MAJESTIES on Wednesday last, who where pleased to bestow very flattering marks of their approbation. After the composer had played his Recollections of England he presented a copy to her MAJESTY (to whom it is dedicated), which was most graciously received.

Brighton Gazette (December 13, 1832): 2.

WEDNESDAY.-(YESTERDAY)

Dinner Party.—Prince and Princess Lieven, Earl Howe, Lady Ashley, Early and Countess Cowper, Earl and Countess of Chesterfield, Prince and Princess Galitsen, Hon. Mrs. G. Anson, Mr. H. Greville, Viscount and Viscountess Sydney, and Sir Henry Halford.

Calls.—Rear Admiral Thompson, Sir. W. Dalling, Mr. and Lady Caroline Massey, Marchioness and Ladies Cornwallis, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas, Lieut. Col. Thornton, (Grenadier Guards) Mrs. G. and Miss Byng, Mr. and Mrs. Hill, Lady S. Amherst, Lord Holmesdale, and Rear Admiral Schomberz.

Brighton Guardian (December 26, 1832): 2.

WEDNESDAY.—The King gave audience the Duke of Devonshire and Vice-Admiral Sir R. Otway.—The Queen, accompanied by Mlle. D’Este, the Ladies Cornwallis, Hon. Miss Bagut, Earl Howe, Prince George, Lieut.-Col. Horace Seymour. Lord Frederick Fitsclarence, Sir Andrew Barnard, &c. &c. took an airing on horseback from twelve till two o’clock.—The King, accompanied by Lady Mary Fox, took a carriage airing to Shoreham; and in returning paid a visit to the Duchess of Gloucester.—The Princess Augusta, attended by Miss Wynyard, took the air m her carriage.—Mr Wilkie, who is employed to take the Queen’s portrait, was honoured by her Majesty with a sitting.—The Princess Augusta, attended by the Marchioness Cornwallis and Miss Wynyard, walked on the Steine and Chain pier.—The Dinner party consisted of Lieut.-Col. And Lady Georgianna do Ros, Sir Peregrine and Lady Sarah Maitland, Col. And Lady Alice Peel, Mr Lawrence and Lady Jane Peel, Mr G. Dawson, and the Duke of Devonshire.—Miss Turner, a pupil of the Royal Academy of Music, had the honour of singing before the Royal party, accompanying herself on the Piano Forte.

Names were left by—

Lieut.-Col. Ewart, Sir Augustus and Lady Clifford, Col. Sir Thomas Dowman, Dowager Lady Kilmaine, Hon. R. H. Browie and Miss Disbrowe Miss de R., Sir George and Lady Berkeley, Capt Dixon, Lord Walter Buthy, Capt. Mac Mahon, Mr Gambier, Countess Dowager of Rothes, Lady Mary L[*], Capt. And Mrs. R. Stanhope, Prince and Princess Galitsin.

The Court Journal: Gazette of the Fashionable World, vol. 4, (December 15, 1832): 821.

[People presented at the Royal dinner-table]

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12.

The Duke of Sussex, the Princess Augusta, Prince and Princess Lieven, Prince and  and Princess Galitzin, Earl and Countess of Chesterfield, Earl Brownlow, Earl Howe, Earl and Countess Cowper, Lady Ashley, Hon. Mr G. Anson, Earl and Countess of Errol, Earl Mount-Edgcumbe, Mr Henry Grenville, Lady Mary Fox, Sir Philip and Lady Sophia Sidney, Viscount and Viscountess Sidney, Lady Kennedy Erstkine, Mdlle. D’Este, Sir Henry Halford, Hon. Miss Bagot, Sir Andrew Barnard, and Miss Wynyard.

The Court Journal: Gazette of the Fashionable World, vol. 4, (December 29, 1832): 857.

—At one of the late musical parties at the Pavilion, several solos on the Organ and the Piano-forte, were executed by Mr Moscheles, who had also the honour, on that occasion, of playing before their Majesties, a new Fantasia expressly composed for the Queen. Mr Moscheles performed on the Grand Pianoforte which was made for the late King George the Fourth, by Erard.