12 July 1833

     Benefit Concert for the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children

London: Henry Thomas Hope’s Esq. Mansion, Duchess Street, Portugal Place

Time: Morning, Two o’Clock

Tickets: 1 Guinea

Programme

AirMme Malibran 
Aria, ‘Torna in quell’ onda chiora’Mme PastaLord Burghersh
From Il Fanatico per la Musica 
Duet, ‘Con pazienza sopportiamo’
Mme Malibran, [?]Mayer
From Bianca e Fernando 
Aria, ‘Deh! non ferir, deh sentimio’
Mme de MericBellini
From La Festa della Rosa: Aria, ‘Io di vedi’Mme MalibranPavesi
From L’ Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato: Air, ‘Sweet Bird’Miss BruceHandel
From L’ Italiana in Algeri: Trio, ‘Pappataci’ Rossini
Madrigal for Five Voices, ‘Troppo t’affidi’Mlle Salvi, Mme Pasta, Signori Donzelli, Tamburini, ZuchelliLord Burghersh
Piano Duet Variations on the March from Guillaume TellMessrs. Herz, Moscheles 
Violin and Orchestra Variations on The Carnival of VeniceMr. PaganiniPaganini
Principal Vocalists: Miss Bruce, Mlle Salvi, Mesdames de Meric, Malibran, Pasta; Messrs. Begrez, Braham, Signori de Begnis, Donzelli, Zuchelli, Tamburini
Principal Instrumentalists: Messrs. Dragonetti, Herz, Lindley, Mori Moscheles, Nicholson, Paganini, Puzzi
Leader: Mr. Nicolas Mori; Conductor: Sir George Smart

———————————

Moscheles: ‘The music, to which I contributed my mite, was performed in the room of the masters of the Italian school; if inclined to migrate, one could enjoy a stroll in a room full of Dutch pictures, but as Malibran and Paganini were among the performers everyone was satisfied to stop and listen’. 

RMM, 195-196.

Advertisements

The Morning Post (June 29, 1833): 3.

It is with much pleasure we announce that H. T. HOPE, Esq., M. P., has generously granted the use of his magnificent Gallery in Duchess-street, for a Morning Concert in aid of the funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary, for Sick Children, which enjoys the patronage of their MAJESTIES, and has, during a period of thirteen years, afforded relief to upwards of 70,000 children of the poor. We have no doubt that the opportunity thus afforded of hearing the first English and foreign talent in this splendid room—rich in the finest productions of the pencil—together with the active patronage of the many distinguished Ladies who have, we understand, promised their support, will ensure an excellent attendance.

The Bell’s New Weekly Messenger (June 30, 1833): 301.

ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY.— We are glad to find that active exertions are being made by some affluent and benevolent Ladies and Gentlemen in behalf of that most useful institution, the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for the Diseases of Children. We nnderstand [sic] that H. J. Hope, Esq. M.P. has most liberally and humanely granted the use of his splendid Gallery in Duchess-street for Morning Concert, which will shortly take place, in aid of the funds of this highly deserving charity; and we doubt not but the extraordinary attraction of this choice and extensive collection of the works of art, together with the addition of as great a musical treat as the best native and foreign talent of the Metropolis can afford, will not fail of fulfilling the benevolent intentions of the many nobility and others who are now so laudably exerting themselves in behalf of the suffering children of the poor.

The Morning Post (July 5, 1833): 1.

A GRAND MORNING MUSICAL MEETING, in Aid of the Funds of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for CHILDREN, under the immediate Patronage of their MAJESTIES, will be held in the splendid Picture Galleries of H. T. Hope, Esq., M. P., Duchess-street, Portland-place, who has most liberally granted the use of them on this occasion, for FRIDAY, July 12, 1833. This Festival will be held under the most exalted Patronage, and will embrace all the first-rate musical [*] vocal and instrumental, now in London. Particulars will be published to-morrow, and every succeeding day, and may now be obtained at Mr. Joseph Wilks’s, 186, Regent-street; Mr. G. Boyle’s, 291, Regent-street, Treasurers of the Infirmary; and Mr. Stock’s, 187, Regent-street. 

The Court Journal: Gazette of the Fashionable World, vol. 5, (July 6, 1833): 480.

A GRAND MORNING MUSICAL MEETING, in aid of the FUNDS of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for CHILDREN (under the immediate Patronage of their Majesties), will be held in the splendid Picture Gallery of H. T. Hope, Esq., M. P., Duchess-street, Portland place, who has most liberally granted the use of them, on this occasion, for FRIDAY, the 12th of July.

The following eminent Performers have most liberally promised their gratuitous assistance on this charitable occasion:—Vocal Performers: Mesdames Pasta, Madame De Meric, Madame Puzzi, Miss Shirreff, Miss Bruce, and Madame Malibran; Mr. Braham; Signor Donzelli, Herr Haitzinger, Signor Giubilei, Signor Tamburini, Signor Zuchelli, and Signor De Begnis. Instrumental Performers: Violin, Signor Paganini; Piano-forte, Mr Moscheles and Mr Herz; Harp, Mr Bochsa; Flute, Mr Nicholson; Horn, Signor Puzzi; Violoncello, Mr Lindley; Contra-Basso, Signor Dragonetti—Leader of the Band, Mr Mori; Conductor, Sir George Smart.

Full particulars of the Concert (which will commence at Two o’clock) will be duly announced.

Tickets, one guinea each, may be had at the Music-shops of Messrs. Lonsdale and Co., Chappell and Mori, Bond street; Cramer and Co., Regent street; Willis, St. James’s street; Clementi and Co. Cheapside; Mr Stock, 187, Regent-street; Mr Joseph Wilks, 186 Regent street; and Mr George Boyle, 290 Regent street, Treasures of the Infirmary.

The Observer (July 7, 1833): 4.

GRAND MORNING MUSICAL MEETING in aid of the FUNDS of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for CHILDREN, under the immediate patronage of their MAJESTIES, in the Splendid Picture Galleries of H. T. Hope, Esq., M. P., Duchess-street, Portugal-place, who has most liberally granted the use of them for Friday next, the 12th of July, expressly for this occasion, under the Patronage of 

Her Royal Highness the Duchess of GLOUCESTER. 

The Duchess of NORTHUMBERLAND. 

The Duchess DE DINO. 

Marchioness of SalisburyCountess of JerseyCountess of Belfast
Marchioness of StaffordCountess ManversViscountess Beresford
Marchioness of WellesleyCountess of VerulamLady Burghersh
March. of WestmeathCountess BrownlowLady Sarah Ingestrie
March. of LondonderryCountess CarlisleLady Elizabeth Reynell
Countess of DenbighCountess of MortonLady Ouseley

The following eminent Performers have most liberally promised their gratuitous assistance on this Charitable Occasion (whith the kind permission of Mr. Laporte):—Vocal Performers: Madame Pasta, Madame De Meric, Miss Shirreff. Miss Bruce, and Madame Malibran, Mr. Braham, Herr Haitzinger (by permission of Mr. Bunn), Signors Donzelli, Tamburini, Zuchelli, Giubilei, Begrez e De Begnis.—Instrumental Performers: Violin, Signor Paganini; Pianoforte, Mr. Moscheles and Mr. Herz; Flute, Mr. Nicholson; Corno, Signor Puzzi; Harp, Mr. Bochsa and Mr. Bunn; Violoncello, Mr. Lindley and Mr. [*]; Contra Basso, Signor Dragonetti; Leader of the Band, Mr. Mori; Conductor, Sir George Smart. —Full particulars of the Concert (which will commence at Two o’Clock) will be duly announced.—Tickets, One Guinea each, may be had at the Music Shops of Messrs. Lonsdale and Co.; Chappells and Mori, Bond-street; Willis, St. James’s; Clementi and Co., Cheapside; Mr. Baxter, 12, Albany-street, Regent’s Park; Mr. Stock, 137, Regent-street; and of the Treasurers, Mr. Josh. Wilks, 186, Regent-street, and Mr. George Boyle, 290. Regent-street. 

The Morning Post (July 8, 1833): 1.

GRAND MORNING MUSICAL MEETING in AID of the FUNDS of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for SICK CHILDREN, under the immediate patronage of their MAJESTIES, in the splendid Picture Galleries of H. T. Hope, Esq., M. P., Duchess-street, Portugal-place, who has liberally granted the use of them for FRIDAY, July 12, expressly for this occasion, under the patronage of her Royal Highness the Duchess of Gloucester, the Duchess of Northumberland, the Duchess de Dino, Marchioness of Salisbury, Marchioness of Stafford, Marchioness Wellesley, Marchioness of Westmeath, Marchioness of Londonderry, Countess of Denbigh, Countess of Jersey, Countess Manvers, Countess of Verulam, Countess Brownlow, Countess of Carlisle, Countess of Morton, Countess of Belfast, Viscountess Beresford, Lady Burghersh, Lady Sarah Ingestre, Lady Elizabeth Reynell, Lady Ouseley, of whom vouchers may be had. The following eminent Performers have most liberally promised their gratuitous assistance on this charitable occasion:—Vocal Performers (with the kind permission of Monsieur Laporte), Madame Pasta, Madame De Meric, Signor Donzelli, Signor Tamburini, Signor Giubelei, and Signor Zuchelli; Miss Bruce, Mr. Braham, Signor Begrez, Signor De Begnis, and (with the kind permission of Mr. Bunn) Madame Malibran.—Instrumental Performers; Signor Paganini; Pianoforte, Mr. Moscheles, Mr. Herz; Harp, Mr. Bochsa; Corno, Mr. Puzzi; Violoncello, Mr. Lindley; Contra Basso, Signor Dragonetti; Leader of the Band, Mr. Mori; Conductor, Sir George Smart. Full particulars of the Concert (which will commence at Two o’Clock) will be duly announced. Tickets, One Guinea each, can be had at the Music-Shops of Messrs. Lonsdale and Co.; Chappells and Mori, Bond-street; Willis, St. James’s; Clementi and Co., Cheapside; Mr. Baxter, 12, Albany-street, Regent’s Park; Mr. Stock, 137, Regent-street; and of the Treasurers, Mr. Josh. Wilks, 186, Regent-street, and Mr. George Boyle, 290. Regent-street. 

The Morning Chronicle (July 9, 1833): 3.

Although the season draws near its end, we are gratified to find by the pleasing example before us, that the spirit of charity is not yet exhausted. We allude to the liberal offer made by Mr. HOPE of his Noble Picture Galleries for a Concert, in aid of the Funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children, and the anxiety of all the first musical talent at present in London, to lend their gratuitous assistance on the occasion, thus affording a rare union of the unrivalled powers of Pasta, Malibran, De Meric, Donzelli, Tamburini, De Begnis, and our own Braham, with Paganini, Moschelles, Herz, Bochsa, Puzzi, Lindley, Mori. Dragonetti, &c., and the delightful lounge in a gallery crowded with the finest productions of the pencil and chisel.

The Morning Post (July 9, 1833): 3.

It has rarely happened, even in this country so famed for the combination of every thing that is extraordinary, that an opportunity of hearing the most eminent performers, vocal as well as instrumental, on an occasion peculiarly interesting, has occurred where at the same time the eye and a taste for vertu will be indulged to its utmost compass; yet this is what we confidently expect to be the case on Friday next, the 12th instant, when, by the kind permission of its generous proprietor, the splendid picture gallery of H. T. HOPE, Esq., M. P., in Duchess-street, Cavendish-square, will resound with the melodious notes of PASTA, MERIC, MALIBRAN, BRAHAM, DONZELLI, TAMBURINI, heightened by the talents of the first-rate instrumental artistes in the metropolis, among whom the public will be delighted to find that king of violinists, PAGANINI. Hospitality, which is proverbial in Mr. HOPE’S family, will on this occasion have the double merit of promoting the object of charity by aiding the funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary of Children, while it entertains those who are willing to support it. 

The Morning Post (July 10, 1833): 5.

His Grace the Duke of BUCCLEUCH will have the honour to entertain their MAJESTIES on Friday evening, next, and we are anxious to state that the Committee for managing the Grand Concert to be given on that day in the splendid picture galleries of Mr. HOPE, in Duchess-street, in aid of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children, have determined that the Concert shall commence at one precisely, instead of two, in order to enable their distinguished visitors to proceed from the concert-room to the villa at Richmond. The names of the several performers, as we have already informed our readers, comprise all the musical excellence now in London, and a [*] of the programme will convince those who are conversant in those matters that the pieces selected are calculated to exhibit the peculiar talent of each performer in the strongest and most favourable light. Although the fame of Mr. HOPE’S collection of pictures has spread [*] wide, but few persons, comparatively, have enjoyed the enviable privilege of witnessing its excessive richness; and by, those who have not this opportunity must not be slighted. With a feeling of hospitality quite unusual on such occasions Mr. HOPE has expressed his intention to provide refreshments for the whole party.

The Morning Post (July 10, 1833): 6.

GRAND MORNING CONCERT, in Aid of the Funds of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for CHILDREN, under the especial Patronage of their MAJESTIES, at Mr. Hope’s splendid Gallery, Duchess-street, Portland-place, on FRIDAY next, July 12, to commence at Two o’Clock precisely. Vocal Performers—Mesdames Pasta, De Meric, Bruce, and Malibran; Mr. Braham; Signor Donzelli, Tamburini, Zuchelli, Giubelei, Begrez, e De Begnis. Instrumental Performers—Signor Paganini; Messrs. Moscheles, Herz, Puzzi, Bochsa, Lindley, and Dragonetti. Conductor, Sir George Smart.—Tickets, One Guinea Each, may be had at the Music Shops of Messrs. Lonsdale and Co.; Chappell and Mori’s, Bond-street; Willis’s, St. James’s; Clementi and Co.’s, Cheapside; Mr. Baxter’s, 12, Albany-street, Regent’s Park; Mr. Stock’s, 187, Regent-street; and of the Treasurers, Mr. Joseph Wilks, 186, Regent-street; and Mr. G. Boyle, 290, Regent street.

The Globe and Traveller (July 11, 1833): 3.

We have observed that, as the season draws near to its close, the Caterers for Public Amusement endeavour to increase their attractions; but we could scarcely have anticipated so rich a treat as that promised on Friday next at the Concert in Aid of the Funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary, when all the Musical Talent in London, including even the great Paganini, have kindly consented to lend their aid on this splendid occasion. Mr. Hope, the hospitality of whose family is proverbial, not content with providing refreshments for the whole company, has most liberally determined upon throwing open the whole unrivalled suite of rooms, including the far-famed Dutch Gallery of Cabinet Pictures.

The Morning Chronicle (July 11, 1833): 3.

GRAND MORNING CONCERT, in AID of the FUNDS of the ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY for CHILDREN, under the immediate Patronage of their Majesties, at Mr. Hope’s splendid Gallery, Duchess-street, Portland-place, TO-MORROW, July 12, to commence at Two o’clock precisely. Vocal Performers: Mesdames Pasta, De Meric, Bruce, and Malibran; Mr. Braham; Signor Donzelli, Tamburini, Zuchelli, Giubilei, Begrez, De Begnis. Instrumental Performers: Signor Paganini, Messrs. Moscheles, Herz, Puzzi, Bochsa, Lindley, and Dragonetti. Conductor, Sir G. Smart.—Tickets, 1l. 1s., each, can be had at the Music Shops; of Messrs. Lonsdale and Co.; Chappell and Mori’s, Bond-street; Willis’s, St. James’s; Clementi and Co.’s, Cheapside; Mr. Baxter, 12, Albany-street, Regent’s Park; Mr. Stock, 187, Regent-street; and of the Treasurers, Mr. Josh. Wilks, 186, Regent-street; and Mr. Geo. Boyle, 290, Regent street.

The Morning Chronicle (July 11, 1833): 3.

This is nearly the last opportunity we shall have of reminding the fashionable world that the preparations for the Grand Musical Meeting, to be held in Mr. HOPE’S Picture Galleries TO-MORROW, are in active progress, and are upon a scale of liberality quite unusual on such occasions. We are not aware that any charitable institution of the metropolis has ever yet been enabled to employ the same powerful attractions as those which present themselves in the present instance. The liberality with which nearly all the first-rate musical talent now in London has consented to exert itself, and the kindness with which Messrs. Bunn and Laporte have granted their permission to the performers of their respective establishments, will ensure to the musical world a most delightful treat; whilst the gorgeous array of pictorial embellishment with which the walls of the several galleries are covered, will, we doubt not, attract hundreds to whom this opportunity never can again present itself. The Managing Committee of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children have been compelled to fix the commencement of the concert for one o’clock, instead of two, to enable such of their visitors as are to have the honour of meeting their Majesties at the Duke of Buccleuch’s, in the evening, to proceed from the concert room to the villa at Richmond.

The Morning Post (July 11, 1833): 3.

MUSICAL FESTIVAL AT MR. HOPE’S

The preparations for the Grand Morning Musical Festival in aid of the funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children, at Mr. HOPE’S magnificent galleries in Duchess-street, Portland-place, are proceeding with great spirit and activity, and we do not hesitate to predict that to the lovers of music and the fine arts this will prove the greatest treat that the caterers to public enjoyment could possible have contrived. Without wishing to detract in the smallest degree from the kindness and liberality with which so many of the first vocal and instrumental performers now in town so readily volunteered their gratuitous services, on this charitable occasion we feel it due to him ,after the manner in which his name has been brought before the public, to state that Signor PAGANINI consented to add his wonderful talent to aid in the cause of charity with a promptitude and liberality that did honour to his feelings.

We understand that Mr HOPE has consented to throw open all his magnificent galleries on this occasion, so that an opportunity hitherto rarely permitted will be now afforded of seeing his celebrated Dutch Collection of Paintings.

Mr. HOPE’S family has long been celebrated for hospitality, and we are assured that he has most liberally expressed his intention to provide refreshments for the immense assemblage of exalted and fashionable company which we doubt not he will have to entertain.

The Standard (July 11, 1833): 3.This is nearly the last opportunity we shall have of reminding the fashionable world that the preparations for the Grand Musical Meeting, to be held in Mr. Hope’s Picture Galleries to-morrow, are in active progress, and are upon a scale of liberality quite unusual on such occasions. We are not aware that any charitable institution of the metropolis has ever yet been enabled to employ the same powerful attractions as those which present themselves in the present instance. The liberality with which nearly all the first-rate musical talent now in London has consented to exert itself, and the kindness with which Messrs. Bunn and Laporte have granted their permission to the performers of their respective establishments, will ensure to the musical world a most delightful treat; whilst the gorgeous array of pictorial embellishment with which the walls of the several galleries are covered, will, we doubt not, attract hundreds to whom this opportunity never can again present itself. The managing committee of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children have been compelled to fix the commencement of the concert for one o’clock, instead of two, to enable such of their visitors as are to have the honour of meeting their Majesties at the Duke of Buccleuch’s, in the evening, to proceed from the concert room to the villa at Richmond

Reviews

The Morning Post (July 13, 1833): 3.

MUSICAL. 

One of the most attractive Concerts of the season was given yesterday at the mansion of H. T. HOPE, Esq., for the benefit of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary for Children. On this occasion the sacred cause of charity was supported by a rare combination of musical talent. The programme contained the names of PASTA, MALIBRAN, DE MERIC, and SALVI and our own accomplished countrywoman, Miss BRUCE; of BRAHAM, DONZELLI, BEGREZ, ZUCHELLI, and DE BEGNIS; of MOSCHELES, HERZ, PUZZI, and NICHOLSON, and of the prince of violinists, PAGANINI. We cannot within our limit enumerate the various performances; still less can we attempt to assign to each, where all were excellent, its relative degree of praise. But we must mention, as having elicited very warm applause, and as having deserved it, the pianoforte duet, variations on the march in Guillaume Tell, by MOSCHELES and HERZ, and the new madrigal of Lord BURGHERSH, Troppo t’affidi, which was admirably sung by Madame PASTA, Mdlle. SALVI, DONZELLI, TAMBURINI, and ZUCHELLI. PAGANINI excited as usual, by one of his own sonatas, a combined feeling of wonder and delight. As a musical treat this Concert has the rarely been surpassed; but we feel that it would be unjust to the benevolent and public-spirited proprietor of the mansion in which it was given to overlook the fact that much of its success, as a means of enriching the funds of the Charity to which it was devoted, is to be ascribed to his generosity in throwing open for the occasion his private residence, long celebrated as a receptacle of the richest and rarest treasures of art, as an abode for the embellishment of which princely wealth has shed its splendour, and refined taste has exerted its discriminating powers. We must not forget to mention that, amidst these combined attractions of the arts and of charity, the munificent host had taken care that the British art and virtue of hospitality should also have its appropriate display. 

The Standard (July 13, 1833): 3.

ROYAL METROPOLITAN INFIRMARY FOR

CHILDREN.

The grand morning concert in aid of this admirable institution took place yesterday at Mr. Hope’s residence in Duchess-street, Portland-place, and was attended by a very assemblage of fashionable people, who had, in addition to the claims of the institution upon their kindly sympathies, the attractions of the sister arts, music and painting. It is indeed luxury to experience at once the highest delights which both can give—to hear Pasta, while you look upon masterpieces to Guido, Paul Veronese, and the works of the [*] chisel. Me. Hope’s Italian and sculpture Galleries were both nearly filled on this occasion. The performances were of the highest kind, but chiefly vocal. Pasta sang a very agreeable aria “Torna in quell’ onda chiora,” by Lord Burghersh. She also joined in the madrigal “Troppo t’ affida; also by the same noble composer, and, for its skilful harmony, highly to his credit; and, to conclude her exertions for the good work, she joined with Zuchelli in a charming duet, “Io ti vedi,” from La Festa della Rosa of Pavesi. We have not latterly heard Pasta in finer voice. De Meric sang her favourite “Deh non ferir” very spiritedly; and Malibran, in addition to her amusing duet, “Conpazienza sopportiamo,” from Meyer’s Fanatico per Musica, gave some Provengal airs, which suiter her admirably, as they were full of beautiful but wayward fancy, Miss Bruce sang Handel’s “Sweet Bird” with great truth and sweetness. Donzelli, Tamburini, Zuchelli, De Begnis, Begrez, and Braham, also lent their aid to this Concert; and it won even Paganini’s self “to quite set free” a fantasia on his magic violin. After the concert was over the company enjoyed the gratification of promenading through the entire suite of chief apartments in this fine mansion, as well as through the cabinets of antiques and gallery of Dutch masters, which is unquestionably one of the best in point of selection in Europe, exhibiting the refined, not the course, chef d’œuvres of the old painters of the Low Countries. Not content, however, with giving this liberal use of his most attractive dwelling to aid the purposed of charity, Mr. Hope further provided for those who attended the concert refreshments of the choicest description, and in abundance. On the whole his conduct in this affair was liberal in the highest degree, and worthy of imitation by those who would add to the character of a Macenas its purest honours.

The Spectator (July 13, 1833): 646-647.

THE CHARITY CONCERT AT MR. HOPE’S.

THE concert, yesterday, at Mr. HOPE’S splendid mansion in Dutchess Street, in aid of the Metropolitan Infirmary for Children, was altogether unique. The music formed only one element in the morning’s entertainment; which was a feast for more senses than that of hearing. The scheme of the concert was like any other of the season; including “Pappataci,” and such like rarities. PASTA, MALIBRAN, DE MERIC, DONZELLI, TAMBURINI, DE BEGNIS, were the vocalists; MOSCHELES and HERZ executed a duet brilliantly on the pianoforte; LINDLEY, DRAGONETTI, MORI, &c. were among the leading instrumental performers; and PAGANINI achieved his marvels on the violin. The orchestra was arranged in one of the principal picture-galleries; which was of course crammed with the fashionable world. Arriving somewhat late in the day, we were well content to take our ease in the cool and classic retreat formed by the gallery of sculpture adjoining, where the overflowing of the crowd in the concert-room listened to the softened strains of the music; and to range through the noble suite of apartments. Those more distant from the scene of attraction were deserted; and their stillness harmonized well with the chaste and classic splendour of their furniture and decorations. It was like visiting the house of PLINY in Pompeii, and finding it suddenly restored to its pristine magnificence. We cannot fancy any thing more correct in taste or more perfectly in keeping. The most subordinate minutiæ of decoration are not overlooked; a classic feeling pervades all the arrangements; the hand of taste is visible everywhere. It is well known that Mr. THOMAS HOPE not merely superintended, but designed and selected the principal part of the furniture and ornaments. The collection of paintings, sculpture, and vases, does honour to the taste and munificence of the British merchant; whose talents ennobled his name far beyond the nobility of birth or title. 

The liberality of Mr. HENRY HOPE on this occasion was worthy of the son of such a princely father. To throw open his house, with all its classic attractions, for the purpose of assisting a charity, was handsome. But Mr. HOPE was not satisfied with this ordinary liberality: he treated the supporters of the charity as his friends. The choicest refreshments were supplied in profusion all the company; an instance of hospitality quite unexampled and not to be expected on such occasions. Every individual visitor must have felt it a personal courtesy.

The whole scene was most attractive. Passing through the elegant drawing-room, you entered the dining-room, where the refreshments were tastefully laid out. The coup d’ œil was sumptuous; and presented a striking contrast to the cool and chaste classicality of the sculpture-gallery adjoining. The bright colours of the pictures on the walls, the gorgeous lustre of the gold plate on the sideboards and on the table, where the colours of the grapes and pines, and even of the wines and liqueurs intermingled, combined to furnish as rich a feast for the eye as for the palate. At the end of the first part of the concert, when the company separated to promenade the apartments and partake of the refreshments, we were able to squeeze into the picture-gallery, and get a peep at some of the paintings,—especially three exquisite creations by GUIDO, where female loveliness was depicted with a delicacy and reality that withstood even the comparison of the living and breathing forms beside them. We also caught sight of two of SALVATO’S wild and poetical scenes; and the works of RAPHAEL, VANDYKE, PAUL VERONESE, and RUBEN’S Death of Adonis; with which, and with others at a distance, we desire a more intimate acquaintance than we could form in the midst of a scene possessing such varied attractions. We could see nothing of the musical performers; and only got a glimpse of the scintillations of PAGANINI’S magic bow through the legs of a Greek warrior is said that the groans of the brute creation entered his soul: and his feelings were not like those of some others, wholly exhausted by a particular class of sufferers: he was universally humane. In the relations of his life he was exemplary: his heart was ever open, and the purse was never closed, save when it was empty.

We love the piety of the nephew who publishes these Letters, and who has already ushered into the world several valuable posthumous publications found among his uncle’s papers. The Letters have many claims upon us: they touch upon public events of an interesting character in a peculiar manner; they exhibit the writer’s own amiable but nervous character; they give an agreeable picture of the connexion that often subsists between the solitary London student and his native town, perhaps the only tie which binds him to the world and its ways. 

Some of the letters of RITSON are odd; but in many, especially those to his nephew, there is a fund of instruction blended with humour.

Evening Mail (July 15, 1833): 2.

MORNING CONCERT.—Yesterday morning a concert was given in aid of the funds of the Royal Metropolitan Infirmary at Mr. Hope’s picture-galleries, where the company had the opportunity of enjoying at once the pleasure to be derived from a union of the arts of painting, sculpture, and music. The concert was given in the large picture-gallery, in which there are some very fine sculptures; but the sculpture-gallery and the smaller picture-gallery, which contains some of the finest productions of the Dutch school, together with the whole magnificent suits of apartments, were thrown open to the visitors. As a proof that the concert was one of the best that has been given during the present musical season, it is only necessary to mention the names of the principal performers, who generously gave their gratuitous services. Among the singers were—Pasta, Malibran, De Meric, Donzelli, Braham, Zuchelli, and Tamburini; and among the instrumentalists were—Paganini (who played his variations on “The Carnival of Venice”; Mori, Lindley, Dragonetti, Nicholson, Moscheles, and Herz. The rooms were crowded with fashionable company; and the refreshments, which were liberally supplied by Mr. Hope, were excellent. Bills were distributed among the company containing prepositions for a penny subscription, to be applied to the formation of a ward for the reception of sick children.